Immediate advice needed. PLEASE HELP

  1. Hey everyone,

    I need some urgent advice. I recently reached out to a skilled nursing facility, had an interview, and had orientation today. Unfortunately, the pay and what they expected of me as a RA was not exactly what I expected, especially with no nurses on floor during graveyard shift. It made me feel very overwhelmed and uncomfortable. Before they spend resources on training me, I would like to politely decline the job. It feels so awkward though. I am not sure how I can decline the position. Any advice on how I can politely decline the position without coming off as unprofessional and possibly burning bridges? Again, I feel terrible for declining, but I feel like if I wait, something better will come along especially when I get my certification soon.
  2. Visit FutureNurseGirl profile page

    About FutureNurseGirl

    Joined: Feb '18; Posts: 4; Likes: 1

    16 Comments

  3. by   Rose_Queen
    If you had orientation, then you already accepted the position and are considered an employee- I know of no employer that would provide orientation for a non-employee. At this point, it would be a matter of turning in your notice of resignation. That could mean they would have you work out the notice or they may tell you not to bother coming back. Either way, it's not going to look good to the employer or the parent organization.
  4. by   Hope2banurse1
    Did you accept the position? Cause if you're having orientation it means you already have the job. Look, if the pay isn't working for you, then it isn't. You can't care how they're gonna feel or the parent company. Just let them know you got a better offer, thank them for the opportunity and keep it moving.
  5. by   FutureNurseGirl
    I didn't have any training at all as of yet. Today is essentially the day they had a run through of their policies and went over the responsibilities of the job and the likes which a lot was not made known at the interview. So this is why I have come to the conclusion that I am not a good fit for the job and vice versa. Would you recommend that I send an email thanking them for an opportunity or how would you go about the situation now if you were in my shoes?
  6. by   Hope2banurse1
    Ok, got you. I would write a letter and bring it to the office. Rent/mortgage is too high to not be making good money especially if more details of the job is coming to light that wasn't on the posting, or discussed in the interview etc. You need to be paid what you're worth.
  7. by   _littlemissBSN
    While reading this thread, I'm having flashbacks of mid-August of last year where I was offered a job at an LTC as a new grad and I accepted it. I honestly did not think about it carefully since I was in a hurry to get a job until I did some research on what LTC culture is like and went over what is expected of me as an RN in that facility...And guess what, I could not sleep for a week given how overwhelmed I already felt and I have not started working yet! I already accepted the offer, completed the background check and fingerprinting, and was just waiting for orientation.

    I, too, was feeling guilty of potentially quitting when I already accepted the offer. But I didn't want to stress myself out so much and thought about it more. Finally, I sent the person who hired me - she is an LPN, who is also the scheduling supervisor an email saying that I'm respectfully rescinding my application and withdrawing myself from the hiring process. That was less than two weeks before orientation. In that letter, I expressed my apologies for having to withdraw when they have already invested some money, time, and effort on me and told them that after careful thoughts (and counseling), I felt I was not confident and comfortable about the workload and that I'll be doing them a disservice if I pursue the job without being 100% prepared for the role. She took it well and understood my situation.

    Don't be afraid to decline the position if you're not comfortable with it. Follow what your instinct tells you. I did and I could not be happier to have made that decision back then. Best of luck to you!

    PS: Twice did I accept a job offer, completed a background check/fingerprinting, and then quit before orientation. I'm NOT proud of it, but if there's anything I learned from that - is to carefully think about the options and to not settle for what comes first, instead, go to where you feel truly comfortable at and excited about.
  8. by   _littlemissBSN
    Oh, as for my recommendation, I think sending them an e-mail will be fine. Let them know that you appreciate having been offered a position, but cannot proceed with the hiring process because of [- insert personal reasons here - not confident taking up the role or being offered a job somewhere else and that you are unable turn it down]. You are a new grad and they should understand that it is pretty easy to lose you to another job that will offer you things that you will need more at this time.
  9. by   Hope2banurse1
    I wholeheartedly agree with you @littlemissbsn.
  10. by   Mavrick
    Quote from FutureNurseGirl
    Hey everyone,

    I need some urgent advice. I recently reached out to a skilled nursing facility, had an interview, and had orientation today. Unfortunately, the pay and what they expected of me as a RA was not exactly what I expected, especially with no nurses on floor during graveyard shift. It made me feel very overwhelmed and uncomfortable. Before they spend resources on training me, I would like to politely decline the job. It feels so awkward though. I am not sure how I can decline the position. Any advice on how I can politely decline the position without coming off as unprofessional and possibly burning bridges? Again, I feel terrible for declining, but I feel like if I wait, something better will come along especially when I get my certification soon.
    I'm dumb. What is an RA? If there are no nurses on the floor who passes meds?
  11. by   vampiregirl
    Is this a skilled nursing facility or an assisted nursing facility?

    I know the assisted nursing facilities in my area are NOT required to have a nurse on premises at all times, they just have to have one available by phone. A QMA is on site if there is not a nurse scheduled to pass meds at the ones I've interacted with.

    Unfortunately some of the patients in assisted nursing facilities have more acute medical issues and require more care than I suspect was originally intended for these facilities - which can leave both the residents and the staff in difficult situations.
  12. by   amoLucia
    RA = resident assistant???? Makes sense if the SNF had an Assisted Living Wing.
  13. by   KelRN215
    Quote from FutureNurseGirl
    I didn't have any training at all as of yet. Today is essentially the day they had a run through of their policies and went over the responsibilities of the job and the likes which a lot was not made known at the interview. So this is why I have come to the conclusion that I am not a good fit for the job and vice versa. Would you recommend that I send an email thanking them for an opportunity or how would you go about the situation now if you were in my shoes?
    Have they actually offered you a position? If not I'd just leave it alone for now and, when and if they do, thank them for the offer but tell them that you don't believe the position is a good fit and will have to decline. People regularly apply for multiple jobs when job searching and have to turn down some offers. You won't be the first person to decline an offer from this facility.
  14. by   tanwonsaur
    Hey there!

    I can completely understand that you're feeling overwhelmed, but it sounds like you're already an employee at this facility. I would recommend, instead of quitting because you are overwhelmed, talk to management and see what they can do to help you. What changes can they make? Would they be willing to hire more people to make the load less heavy?

    Work with the organization to find out how to help it grow and how to help others avoid this situation. Plus, showing early interest and leadership skills like this look very attractive to employers!

    Best of luck, keep us posted!

close