Accelerated 2nd Bachelor Program?

  1. I'm 3 weeks from graduating with a B.S.,Biology :hatparty:
    and have decided to pursue nursing. I've heard of an accelerated 2nd bachelor program where I could go for one year and get a 2nd bachelor's (Biology being my first) in Nursing since all my science classes would be pre-reqs! Is this true? The only pre-req I don't have is nutrition. If i take nutrition over the summer, what would my classification be? Undergrad? Graduate student? Non-degree seeking student? Should I just take the GRE and enter as a grad student so that I can go straight into the grad program after my 2nd bachelors? I know I can't apply to nursing school until i have had ALL pre-reqs! I'm so confused and no one will help me! I just need a little direction!
    Last edit by biobarbie on Apr 6, '05
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    About biobarbie

    Joined: Apr '05; Posts: 2

    5 Comments

  3. by   arciedee
    Quote from biobarbie
    I'm 3 weeks from graduating with a B.S.,Biology :hatparty:
    and have decided to pursue nursing. I've heard of an accelerated 2nd bachelor program where I could go for one year and get a 2nd bachelor's (Biology being my first) in Nursing since all my science classes would be pre-reqs! Is this true? The only pre-req I don't have is nutrition. If i take nutrition over the summer, what would my classification be? Undergrad? Graduate student? Non-degree seeking student? Should I just take the GRE and enter as a grad student so that I can go straight into the grad program after my 2nd bachelors? I know I can't apply to nursing school until i have had ALL pre-reqs! I'm so confused and no one will help me! I just need a little direction!
    Okay, trying to sort out your questions here... Are you talking about classification for financial aid purposes or in general? If you are taking classes without being enrolled in a program you will probably be considered a non-degree seeking student or a continuing education student. It doesn't really matter. Once in a BSN program you will still be considered an undergrad (or 2nd-degree) student since it is an undergraduate degree. If you were enrolled in a masters program you would be considered a graduate student. If you're concerned about classification from a financial aid standpoint the best thing is really to consult the counselors at the school(s) you are considering to find out how everything would work for someone in your situation.

    Also, many times you CAN apply if you haven't completed all your pre-reqs as long as they will be complete by the time you matriculate (again, check with the schools to be sure).

    Here is the link to the AACN's list of accelerated 2nd degree BSN and direct-entry MSN programs:
    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/pdf/APLIST.PDF

    I hope maybe something in here answered your questions.
  4. by   BETSRN
    Quote from biobarbie
    I'm 3 weeks from graduating with a B.S.,Biology :hatparty:
    and have decided to pursue nursing. I've heard of an accelerated 2nd bachelor program where I could go for one year and get a 2nd bachelor's (Biology being my first) in Nursing since all my science classes would be pre-reqs! Is this true? The only pre-req I don't have is nutrition. If i take nutrition over the summer, what would my classification be? Undergrad? Graduate student? Non-degree seeking student? Should I just take the GRE and enter as a grad student so that I can go straight into the grad program after my 2nd bachelors? I know I can't apply to nursing school until i have had ALL pre-reqs! I'm so confused and no one will help me! I just need a little direction!
    Personally, I do not believe that ANY one year nursing program gives you the experiences you need. I never have and I never will. Once in a while we see these midwifery students (the three year variety) who get their RN in ONE year (and their midwifery in three). They are clueless as to actual hands on nursing. I think we do any and all accelerated students a huge disservice by allowing this type of training.

    As a career, we are doing nursing a terrible injustice by allowing these watered down programs to exist.

    No offense personally, I think it's great that you have all your pre-requisits out of the way. That way, you can concentrate on the academics of nursing. There is much to learn. It is my feeling that NO ONE can become a competent registered nurse in one year.
  5. by   palesarah
    what is your eventual goal as a nurse? RN: staff nurse, management, reseach, teaching? Advanced practice- NP, CNM, CRNA?

    Maybe if we knew what you think you want to do in nursing, we could help you find the best path there a little easier.
  6. by   WhatToDo
    Personally I believe that accelerated BSN programs give you exactly what you need to become a nurse and prepare you just as well. There has been some discussion on these boards about ADN programs providing students with more clinical experience, but this is simply untrue is many cases and can only be determined by actually comparing the ADN and BSN programs in your area.

    Accelerated BSN programs make students go through the exact same classes and clinicals as the traditional 2-year BSN programs. For second degree students, accelerated BSN programs are a great option! For most people getting a BSN after another bachelor's degree is a no brainer becuase the ADN programs tend to take longer once your in this position.

    With the nursing shortage out there, I think it's high time nurses realize that to get people interested in nursing there need to be a lot of options. Most schools have very low acceptence rates becuase there is currently way more interest in nursing then there are spots available in colleges and universities. Most people that do accelerated BSNs or direct entry master's programs already have work experience under their belts and have decided on nursing after really thinking hard about it, not when they are 18 and still trying to figure it all out (no offense to young people who decided on nursing, I wish I had it figured out back then like you!).

    I think how well nurses perform once they are out of college really depends on each nurse as an individual. The majority of jobs that require some kind of college degree have a lot of on-the-job training involved, nursing is no exception. New grads just have to realize they still have a lot of learning to do, no matter what credentials they have behind their name.
  7. by   galaxy781
    Biobarbie,

    I agree with PaleSarah, it would help to know what your career goals are bc there are SOO many routes to go in nursing! With that said, I have a BA in psych and soc and now I want to pursue a nursing degree>

    I started out going back to my community college in an RN assoc program bc I was soo tired of being poor and I just wanted a quick job. I finished my first quarter and an opportunity presented itself. There are programs that allow you go right into a masters of nursing program with an unrelated bachelors degree! There are two types of masters programs MSN and MN, both programs will prepare you to sit for the NCLEX and you will come out a nurse. The MSN will prepare you for NP, an MN shows masters level work but you cant be an NP after getting experience you can teach and go into management with an MN (thats what im doing) I picked the MN track bc I can enter this may and be out by next August. It offered me the quickest way in and out with the highest degree. An associates degree theoretically you can be out in less than two years (since you have a lot of pre reqs) but in my case the waiting list for clinicals in my associates program was atleast 18months! I just didnt want to wait that long.

    There are also programs that allow BSN as a second degree, the only issue I had with that is, I wasnt eligible for fin aid bc I already had one undergrad degree.

    There are also programs that bridge RNS (associate degrees) to MSN-you can skip the BSN all together.

    There are many ways to go about becoming a nurse, I say go to all the websites of all the schools in your area and find out what they offer, I bet you find a lot of different options!

    GOOD LUCK~

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