What is the average hourly pay for a FNP

  1. I live in NJ and work as an RN in a specialtyunit. I'm considering going for the FNP program this fall. I would like to know what is the average pay i could make as a FNP. Also how easy would it be to get a job as a FNP? Would i be able to work in acute care or would i end up in a family clinic?
  2. Visit chyrn profile page

    About chyrn

    Joined: Sep '06; Posts: 2

    46 Comments

  3. by   suebird3
    post moved for more responses.

    suebird
  4. by   MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Typical job listings are $60-85,000 a year for FNPs which is crap. Employers that try to pay this are basically rapists considering what the FNP is probably billing. You can make much more when you reach the point where your productive (30-35 patients a day) and independent. If they offer a productivity bonus with that $85,000, that is reasonable.

    85,000 with a productivity bonus of 20% of what you bill over 2X your salary would be reasonable. So, if you make a salary of 85,000, you would get get 20% of what you bill over 170,000. That's fair. I bill over $600,000 a year. A competant productive FNP could be making 160,000, or more with a productivity bonus. When you first start as a FNP, 60-80,000 a year I guess is reasonable until you become productive.

    As an FNP, you can pretty much wind up where you want. I am in a pediatric clinic and function as pediatric primary care provider, but I can also move into family or another specialty If I like. Being a FNP is much more liberating than say just being a PNP which is trapped solely in pediatrics.
    Last edit by MS, APRN, BC, FNP on Sep 6, '06
  5. by   vortex72
    Thanks for the info. I'm planning on becoming an FNP. I've been an RN for almost 10 years and I'm starting next week to finish my BSN so I can go to an FNP program. Around here, NP jobs had been pretty poor. I personally know many NP's that were still working as RN's because they couldnt find a job and when they did find one they pay was less than they could make as an RN working just a little overtime.

    I have been in acute dialysis the last few years and since I work for a private for profit company, I made much better $ than the average RN so it seemed pointless to get my NP. However, nowadays I know I'm not going to be personally satisfied with what I'm doing and I need to expand my abilities and opportunities to better serve God and others. Its good to know if I land in the right place I can still make some decent money
  6. by   chyrn
    Thanks for your posting. You definitely have given me hope again which i lost after i spoke to a nurse pratitioner. She gave me just about the same range you gave in terms of salary and that really got me discouraged. SHe never mentioned anything about "productivity bonus". Either she does not know about it or she is not able to get it i don't know which one. I just know she is not a new NP so i would think she would know.

    Well thanks again.

    Quote from MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Typical job listings are $60-85,000 a year for FNPs which is crap. Employers that try to pay this are basically rapists considering what the FNP is probably billing. You can make much more when you reach the point where your productive (30-35 patients a day) and independent. If they offer a productivity bonus with that $85,000, that is reasonable.

    85,000 with a productivity bonus of 20% of what you bill over 2X your salary would be reasonable. So, if you make a salary of 85,000, you would get get 20% of what you bill over 170,000. That's fair. I bill over $600,000 a year. A competant productive FNP could be making 160,000, or more with a productivity bonus. When you first start as a FNP, 60-80,000 a year I guess is reasonable until you become productive.

    As an FNP, you can pretty much wind up where you want. I am in a pediatric clinic and function as pediatric primary care provider, but I can also move into family or another specialty If I like. Being a FNP is much more liberating than say just being a PNP which is trapped solely in pediatrics.
  7. by   AllisonLP
    Hey,
    can I ask where you guys are...that seems MUCH higher than it is for the NPs I have spoken with in Tampa.
    Thanks!

    Allison
  8. by   MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Quote from chyrn
    Thanks for your posting. You definitely have given me hope again which i lost after i spoke to a nurse pratitioner. She gave me just about the same range you gave in terms of salary and that really got me discouraged. SHe never mentioned anything about "productivity bonus". Either she does not know about it or she is not able to get it i don't know which one. I just know she is not a new NP so i would think she would know.

    Well thanks again.
    I am in the southwest, and oddly I'm seeing better salary packages with productivity bonuses listed in states like Georgia (and other east coast states) which are the most restrictive to NPs in what they can do. Our office manager told me what I billed which she wasn't supposed to do, and I was shocked to find out I was billing $55-60,000 a month. I make over 100,000 a year. To determine your worth as an NP, you really need to find out what you bill.

    There was a listing in Texas advertising "NPs make what doctors make" and another for an experienced oncology NP that said "Name your price", but the bulk of the offers out there are 60-85,000 which may be fair for a starting NP, but if your competant, productive and independent you should be inquiring about a productivity bonus.

    The average wage for a general practice MD is $160,000. There's no reason NP shouldn't at least be making 100,000+. I consult with docs as much as they consult with each other. I don't see that as a reason for employers to pay less. NPs as a whole need to pull their heads out of their butt and get rid of this Mother Teresa attitude and start demanding what they're worth.

    I'm almost starting to think the lower wage for NPs is because the NP profession is dominated mostly by women.

    It would be good if other NPs here would log on, and list their salaries so this can all be out in the open. I know on the upper end of the scale there are some NPs making around 200,000 according to the stats.
    Last edit by MS, APRN, BC, FNP on Nov 8, '06
  9. by   MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Quote from AllisonLP
    Hey,
    can I ask where you guys are...that seems MUCH higher than it is for the NPs I have spoken with in Tampa.
    Thanks!

    Allison
    What are they making in Tampa?
  10. by   lannisz
    I'm also curious about salary for FNP's. I'm in Oregon and in my second year of the MSN/FNP program. I'm feeling disouraged because I've had so many nurses tell me "well, you're certainly not going to make much more than you did working as a nurse!" I'm really getting tired of working and going to school...I want to know that it's going to be worth it!
  11. by   MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Quote from zias
    I'm also curious about salary for FNP's. I'm in Oregon and in my second year of the MSN/FNP program. I'm feeling disouraged because I've had so many nurses tell me "well, you're certainly not going to make much more than you did working as a nurse!" I'm really getting tired of working and going to school...I want to know that it's going to be worth it!
    That's odd, because I don't know any nurses that make even close to what I make.
  12. by   traumaRUs
    While not an NP, I'm a CNS and make close to $100k and I'm a new grad APN. I will say though that I did not take a job with the hospital I was working at because the pay was dismal.
  13. by   gauge14iv
    Keep in mind when talking about bill rates and what an NP bills - that that doesn't necessarily translate into what is collected/reimbursed.

    An NP (or MD) may bill out 60k in one month - but what is actually reimbursed/paid by insurance and patient copays might only amount to about 20k or 40k or... You need to know that too. And then you also need to know what percentage of the income in the practice is being applied to overhead.

    60k billed out sounds like a lot - and it is - but if actual reimbursed/collected rate is only 60% of that, and overhead is 80% of what is collected, that leaves 7200.00

    Of course reimbursement and collected rates will differ in different types of practices and practice settings, different areas of the country, and different patient populations. Overhead expenses will also vary pretty widely.

    It is best to find out data that is applicable to the type of practice you are in, that way you can base negotiations on solid info. Just knowing what you bill out in a month may not be enough.
  14. by   MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Quote from gauge14iv
    Keep in mind when talking about bill rates and what an NP bills - that that doesn't necessarily translate into what is collected/reimbursed.

    An NP (or MD) may bill out 60k in one month - but what is actually reimbursed/paid by insurance and patient copays might only amount to about 20k or 40k or... You need to know that too. And then you also need to know what percentage of the income in the practice is being applied to overhead.

    60k billed out sounds like a lot - and it is - but if actual reimbursed/collected rate is only 60% of that, and overhead is 80% of what is collected, that leaves 7200.00

    Of course reimbursement and collected rates will differ in different types of practices and practice settings, different areas of the country, and different patient populations. Overhead expenses will also vary pretty widely.

    It is best to find out data that is applicable to the type of practice you are in, that way you can base negotiations on solid info. Just knowing what you bill out in a month may not be enough.
    That is true, but there is no way that over head is even close to 80% of what is collected. Clinics can collect generally anywhere between 60-80% of what is billed. The Doc I'm with seldom shows up (like never), I make 100,000+ , and he lives in a very large house on the hill. His wife just got implants, and he just got back from taking his whole family to Japan. He also drives a $90,000 Mercedez as well as an Escalade. That was nice of me to pay for all that. Being an efficient coder also makes a big difference in collections.

    I am now considering opening a cash only clinic. The numbers look pretty good for that.
    Last edit by MS, APRN, BC, FNP on Sep 9, '06

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