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Nurse makes a bad patient.... arghh

Specializes in surgical, ortho.

Hi, I just had surgery 3 weeks ago (TAH w/ BSO) and I am finding it extremely hard not to do all the things I tell my patients that they can't or should not do. Anyone here ever had this experience? Why is it that as soon as a nurse becomes the patient all her (or his) knowledge seems to fly out the window. I would love to talk to someone who has been in similar experiences. I know that if I was one of my patients I would sure be tempted to give me a very hard time. Help....

Thunderwolf, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Geriatric, Behavioral Health. Has 32 years experience.

Have no answer but that it is a very common. Sometimes, nurses make the worst family visitors of patients, too. It happens. Just remember, give your nurse a break if you end up as a patient. That is often the best gift you can give.

I know I wasn't a pleasant patient when I had the same surgery a few years back. Mostly because it was my body, and I wanted to still be the nurse. I do remember that when my daughter had her baby, I was totally out there. Everything I knew as a labor and delivery nurse went out the window... I was a Mom. I was happy to do the small things like turn her, help her to the bathroom, encourage her. She ended up with a C section and I was the wreck. My co workers were having to nurse me as well...

Grace Oz

Specializes in Med/Surg/Ortho/HH/Radiology-Now Retired.

Haven't known a nurse yet, who wasn't a right royal pain in the a** as a patient! LOL

Perhaps it's a control thing? We're so used to being in control, we can't cope when we're in the vulnerable position.

Hope you recover well and are soon back to enjoying life, (and work!). :-)

Hey Y'all

'Bout 12--13yrs ago my appendix burst. It happened in the Hosp where I'd gone the night before with Abdom pain. It was kinda tough. First of all, the MD in the ER, who I knew cause he was a weekend Intensivist at the ICU I worked at, thought I was drug seeking. Bummer.

The next day my temp spiked up like a rocket (105!!) and I had 'rigors'. The floor nurses must have thought I was about to code!! Hauled me off to the ICU where I worked parttime. The nurses there--all women and all acquainted with me--ripped my clothes off and sponged me til the temp went down. (I sent 'em flowers.)

The next day was Sunday. My surgeon decided to open me up and take a peek so the OR team was called in. A bright sunny face appeared over me (upside down because she was at the head of the stretcher as they were wheeling me into the HoldingRoom). "I'm Jeannie," she said. "I'm going to put you to sleep!"

"I hope you're having a better day than I am!" I growled back.

Lots of the people there knew me too. After they thought I was asleep they were telling stories about me. Nothing anyone would have needed to apologize for, but not what they'd have wanted me to overhear.

Post Op I was fiendishly working on my IncentiveInspirometer and really really trying to be good--ambulating like crazy. Even kept my own I & O (the CNA was amazed--even suspicious.) Then Tues nite my IV began burning like h***.

No one could start a new one. "Well," I allowed, "it's still runniing. Let the dayshift take care of it." Hey--I know how frustrating that can be, ya know? I'm a nurse myself, right?

Big mistake!! Long after my incision was healed and I was back to work and running again, that vein in my arm was tender as can be.

But it made me a better nurse in a few ways. And I got a couple stories to tell out of it ;->.

Papaw John

butterflynurse03, RN

Specializes in surgical, ortho.

I think I can honestly say that I was a pretty good patient while in the hospital. Shoot, I even managed to get out of bed and walk that first evening. My nurses/co-workers were amazed. My problem is behaving here at home now. I keep having to yell at myself for over-doing it. I know I would never let my patients do these things.

I do know that I can't wait to get back to work... but I have another three weeks to go. Truly a bummer.

Thanks everybody. Keep 'em coming!!!!!!!!

SmilingBluEyes

Has 20 years experience.

Hi, I just had surgery 3 weeks ago (TAH w/ BSO) and I am finding it extremely hard not to do all the things I tell my patients that they can't or should not do. Anyone here ever had this experience? Why is it that as soon as a nurse becomes the patient all her (or his) knowledge seems to fly out the window. I would love to talk to someone who has been in similar experiences. I know that if I was one of my patients I would sure be tempted to give me a very hard time. Help....

OHHH Yea, I had that problem as a patient. The dr had ordered me to stay in bed after my very lengthy adhesion removal and D/C but the gas was sooo bad. So I got up OOB 5 hours out of PACU , catheter in one hand, IV pole in the other, and walked the hallway (in horrendous pain duh), against her orders---- and the cautions of my primary nurses. I told them, "write me up in your nurses notes as noncompliant. I can't lay here in pain one more minute" I hate narcs, they make me sick---and I had to move or lose my sanity.

The physician had choice words for me the next morning; she was very displeased with me...I am a terrible patient. But the staff was spared "the rod" of the angry physician. I claimed 100% personal responsibility and liability for going against her orders.

And she did forgive me....lol. I am one STUBBORN girl.

UM Review RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Utilization Management.

I tried SO HARD to be a "good" patient.

But that doggoned anesthesia made all my good intentions fly right out the window. I got sick to my stomach in ICU and one of the nurses came at my IV line with a 3 cc syringe.

Instantly, my nurse self snapped to.

"What's that?"

"Phenergan," she said, AS SHE'S PUSHING IT UNDILUTED.

No matter that I was so toasted on the meds that I couldn't see straight.

"You're supposed to dilute it with 9 cc's of NS," I croaked. "Hospital policy."

Except for one problem--I wasn't a patient in my hospital! :rotfl:

kadokin, ASN, RN

Specializes in Psych.

This thread is so funny and so true. Yep, I am a nurse and a lousy pt. I try to be a good family member when someone is ill, but I probably get on the nurse's nerves anyway. Sorry. I had surgery for the first time 6 yrs ago and I was a royal pain in the neck, to the nurses and to my family. Broke my ankle(badly) and could not deal w/the pain and immobilization. Not to mention, knew just enough about the potential hazards of surgery to be SCARED TO DEATH! Result: not a nice person to be around. But I sure got a taste of things from the pt-eye-view and that is priceless!

It's no fun being on the other side of the bed rail. I had a spleenectomy for a splenic aneurysm, 5 years ago. I was greatful for the amazing care I received. I especially appreciated those that explained things, and didn't just assume that I knew because I'm a nurse. We must treat our patients as if we would our family. The payoff is priceless.

hmm... I was in the hospital I used to work for (my mom still works in the ER as an RN)

for biliary colic. I recieved several mg's of mso4 for pain.

unfortunately, I was having mild relief, and noted a little old lady sitting in front of me, screaming 'nurse! nurse!'...

Apparantly, story goes I started yelling 'Patient! Patient!, why can't someone make this lady stop, I deal with it ALL DAY!', and story goes, I was spitting mad (In pain and tired. grr.)

:|.

apparantly, I was the funniest thing going

(as a side note, both my mom and loving boyfriend have recovered from the lethal case of embarassment I caused them)

--Cashew

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