What would you have said to this CNA - page 7

I was almost done posting this but it went away? Sorry if it comes up twice??? Anyway, I am an RN on a busy day shift med-surg/onc floor. The other day it was crazy. It was about 1400 and I had... Read More

  1. by   sissiesmama
    Quote from BradleyRN
    I wouldnt rest til i had this idiot's job. She has obviously lost track of her role.
    My thoughts exactly, Bradley! I worked my way up from an CNA to ward clerk to LPN to RNC and would never have ever thought of talking to someone like that, especially when it comes to patient care. PLEASE!!! As someone I used to work with, KNOW YOUR ROLE PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Anne, RNC
  2. by   Sade
    Quote from multicollinearity
    According to your profile, you aren't a nurse. How can a non-nurse tell an RN she needs to practice time management?
    I'm an RN and I've worked in quite a few hospitals. From my experience I've worked with a few CNA's and many LPN's who had more common sense and work ethic than some of the RN's had. I'm not standing up for anyone in particular here but IMO I'd hesitate before disregarding someone's observations and opinions just because their name tag has three letters instead of two. Take care.
  3. by   Sade
    Quote from DixieJeanne
    Oh please....

    I am not going to spend my time being all smoochy sweet to my coworkers......"Sally sue, could you pretty please get Mr President in room 208 some water? It'd be such a great favor to me. Thank you so much!"
    I think it's interesting what a sharp contrast in work place attitudes there are between some older and most younger RN's. IMO - I'd much rather work with a younger RN who is humble, teachable, non-abrasive, and non-agressive in there approach. Sometimes it awe's me how nonchalant some RN's are about the metastatic effects their bad attitudes can have on rest of the work environment. Take care.
    Last edit by Sade on Jun 15, '09
  4. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from Sade
    Hello. I'm not trying to be mean, but you asked our opinion. So here it goes. You were so busy that you couldn't take a pee break? You couldn't take a 2 minute break to eat a cracker? But you did have time to write down the 2 tasks, explain your condition to the HUC and ask her to pass along a note to your CNA? You did have time to step away from your work in private to argue with your CNA about this stupid note you left her?:selfbonk:

    With all that being said please write this CNA up for deliberately ignoring a tasks given to her by a RN. The CNA has already admitted to you that she can't be trusted to complete the tasks you give her. Include that in your report.

    Of course the best way to communicate is verbally or hand delivering the note to the CNA in case there are any questions. But in this particular case you were unable to because of an emergency. And just a reminder in case you've forgotten, the CNA is the subordinate.

    Keep your head up and keep moving forward. This too will pass. Take care.
    Are you a nurse? Every time I go in a patient's room, the 5 second task of taking a temp turns into, "Fix my sheets, empty my toilet, I need some water, want to see pictures of my grandkids?" As oppose to writing down taking 10 seconds. Explaining to HUC only needs to consist of, "I'm going on break."
  5. by   wondern
    Quote from Sade
    I think it's interesting what a sharp contrast in work place attitudes there are between some older and most younger RN's. IMO - I'd much rather work with a younger RN who is humble, teachable, non-abrasive, and non-agressive in there approach. Sometimes it awe's me how nonchalant some RN's are about the metastatic effects their bad attitudes can have on rest of the work environment. Take care.
    Wouldn't you say the same goes for everyone on the team?

    If you're lucky you will get 'old' one day too.
    Last edit by wondern on Jun 15, '09
  6. by   Sade
    Quote from blondy2061h
    Are you a nurse? Every time I go in a patient's room, the 5 second task of taking a temp turns into, "Fix my sheets, empty my toilet, I need some water, want to see pictures of my grandkids?" As oppose to writing down taking 10 seconds. Explaining to HUC only needs to consist of, "I'm going on break."
    Please... Save your breath. I think it's quite humorous how many people have attacked me in this thread for merely pointing out the obvious, that the OP needs to take care of her health. And all I hear in the attacks are excuses after excuses why it's impossible to take hypoglycemic precautions.
  7. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from Sade
    Please... Save your breath. I think it's quite humorous how many people have attacked me in this thread for merely pointing out the obvious, that the OP needs to take care of her health. And all I hear in the attacks are excuses after excuses why it's impossible to take hypoglycemic precautions.
    You didn't answer my question...are you a nurse?
  8. by   jollydogg_RN
    Quote from DixieJeanne
    Oh please....

    I am not going to spend my time being all smoochy sweet to my coworkers......"Sally sue, could you pretty please get Mr President in room 208 some water? It'd be such a great favor to me. Thank you so much!"

    Um, no.

    I don't have time for that. Working in the ER I have to get stuff done and get it done fast. I'm gonna say "Sally Sue - the guy in 208 needs water." Period. Actually, I'll be saying it as I run by her on my way to give morphine to my trauma patient with an open fracture. Too bad if she doesn't like it. I'm taking care of people who need me more than I need to be nice to Sally Sue.

    Guess that's why I like working the ER. Nobody gets their feelings hurt nor do they go all crybaby on each other. We're mature enough to know it is not personal and emotionally stable enough to not get in a big high school fight about it. I might yell directions to Sally Sue 4 or 5 times during a shift and we'll still walk out the door together talking about the kids or going out and grabbing a beer.
    if someone said all that to me, that would annoy me more than someone just demanding something from me honestly.

    i didnt say you had to go over the top with asking someone to do something for you, but just a please and a thank you go a long way.

    also, you're in the ER. thats expected. we're talking about another type of unit here.
  9. by   coffee4metech
    Just because I am a Nurse Assistant does not make me stupid , time management is required for all facets of life professional and person situations. You must be assertive of how you use your time and schedule breaks and ask for help as much as possible to make the time to take a break.
  10. by   nursel56
    Quote from Sade
    Please... Save your breath. I think it's quite humorous how many people have attacked me in this thread for merely pointing out the obvious, that the OP needs to take care of her health. And all I hear in the attacks are excuses after excuses why it's impossible to take hypoglycemic precautions.
    The reason for that is you are focussing on a tangential issue. The thread is not "almost passed out from hypoglycemia,what should I do?" There is absolutely no reason to debate that. It's not for the CNAs to decide whether or not her reasons were valid for taking a break, or re-educate her on managing her blood sugars. She asked the CNA to do two tasks that she was hired to do. She said, "thanks" on the note. Where in the world are you seeing "aggression" in that?
  11. by   Scrubby
    Quote from Mrs.NurseAssistant
    Just because I am a Nurse Assistant does not make me stupid , time management is required for all facets of life professional and person situations. You must be assertive of how you use your time and schedule breaks and ask for help as much as possible to make the time to take a break.
    Nobody is saying you are stupid because you are a nurse assistant. But you cannot judge an RN on their time management because you do not understand the scope of practice they have.
  12. by   NurseKitten
    To get back to the original posting:

    That kind of behavior is unacceptable. You acted professionally by doing what you could to diffuse the situation and apologizing, although I do NOT think you were wrong in any way!!!

    There is a difference between being a peacemaker and being a doormat.

    You need to have a chat with your nurse manager. The racial slur alone would be enough to get her canned in my facility. They do not play about that mess. Write a factual accounting of what happened, and ask any licensed nurses who witnessed to do the same. Then file a formal grievance based on a the creation of a hostile work environment.

    If she is not doing her job, not caring for the patients, and creating strife in the unit, she needs to be gone. Period. End of discussion.

    And as uncomfortable as it may be to have to be the one to boot her out the door, it is part of being a leader, one of the roles of the RN.

    Good luck.
  13. by   chevyv
    Quote from Mrs.NurseAssistant
    Just because I am a Nurse Assistant does not make me stupid , time management is required for all facets of life professional and person situations. You must be assertive of how you use your time and schedule breaks and ask for help as much as possible to make the time to take a break.
    Good luck on that one if/when you become a nurse. I used to think along these same lines, but now I know that the nurse is the last stop. You can try all the time management in the world but don't forget to factor in the times when a resident will fall, a cna gets bit and has to go to er, another gets sick and has to go home, oh and by the way your already short staffed! Who do you ask for help when your it? Seriously, the other nurses have their pts so there is no one to cover me for a break. I can't cover them because we are already short on our wing. Something always happens to throw your schedule off.

    Being a Nurse Assistant certainly does not make you stupid at all! Without you, my job would be impossible. It's just that there is usually more than one NA on my wing so they can break each other. There really is nobody to step in for many nurses. Every once in awhile you have a really ideal day when you get a potty break and can eat that sandwich without being at the computer. But I've only had that happen a handful of times.

    In an ideal world it sounds great to make time to take your breaks, but the bottom line is always haunting management which means nothing positive for the nursing staff. Staffing at skeletal levels is scarry enough, but someone always calls in which makes it even worse. The problem starts above and trickles down to the nurses. The problem is always the bottom line

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