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Nurse Charged With Homicide

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Nurse Charged With Homicide

  1. 1. Should Radonda Vaught, the nurse who gave a lethal dose of Vecuronium to patient at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, be charged with reckless homicide?

    • She should not have been charged
      358
    • She deserved to be charged
      104

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If any of you follow ZDoggMD's Youtube channel, you may have seen his video on the Vanderbilt medication error. Like most of us, he was shocked and appalled.

 

After watching this, I saw he posted his reaction to the criminal charges. I was a little surprised at his passion, based on his original video.

 

His take will upset a lot of nurses here on AN. 

One good thing about seeing these videos is that it reminded me of him and his channel. I binged watched a bunch of his videos and found a lot of them to be quite thought provoking. 

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11 hours ago, TriciaJ said:

No, it's not just you.  Pretty sure I would hang it up and get a nice job selling shoes someplace.

I wouldn’t even consider driving for Lyft for fear I’d miss a child crossing the street.

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I'm sure this has been mentioned, but this drug should never have been available for anyone other than a trained anesthesiologist. 

Malpractice, yes. Murder??? 

It blows my mind how punitive our society has become that every mistake is now a crime.

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7 minutes ago, lifelearningrn said:

I'm sure this has been mentioned, but this drug should never have been available for anyone other than a trained anesthesiologist. 

Malpractice, yes. Murder??? 

It blows my mind how punitive our society has become that every mistake is now a crime.

This medication is not used by anesthesiologists only and can be safely administered by other health care providers who are properly trained. I have used it many times. Regardless, she did not properly monitor the patient for the medication she thought she gave. That is her biggest error. 

And she isn't being charged with murder.

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3 hours ago, lifelearningrn said:

I'm sure this has been mentioned, but this drug should never have been available for anyone other than a trained anesthesiologist. 

Malpractice, yes. Murder??? 

It blows my mind how punitive our society has become that every mistake is now a crime.

How come? There are situations when paralytics are used in the ICU outside of the anesthesiologists’ realm. Patients with severe ARDS are paralyzed to allow lung rest and compliance with low lung volume ventilation. In a Neuro ICU setting, patients with refractory status epilepticus do get paralyzed in extreme situations and Vanderbilt is a quaternary referral center so I would assume that’s not rare there. For that reason, nurses would need access to these drugs if they were ordered.

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I wouldn’t call it ICU Nursing 101 but I remember that part of my orientation as a new ICU nurse was to know my drugs and drips. Neuromuscular Blocking Agents or paralytics we’re taught and it was drilled to my head to be vigilant that any of my patients on paralytics must also be sedated with an amnestic agent so they don’t have awareness of their paralysis. This was an institution that was not a Vanderbilt by all means but the CNS that was teaching me at the time left such an impression on my awareness of the safety of this drug.

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@Horseshoe I just watched the videos you posted...

In his passionate defense of the nurse, ZDoggMD said, "she made a mistake." As if she is just like any of us.

But actually,  "she made an mistake, and then another... and then another... and then another ... and then another ...and then another ...and then another"  If at any point she had stopped making mistakes the patient would not have died.

That is the difference between all of us who "make a mistake", because there is nearly always another safety check that checks us.

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3 minutes ago, mtmkjr said:

@Horseshoe I just watched the videos you posted...

In his passionate defense of the nurse, ZDoggMD said, "she made a mistake." As if she is just like any of us.

But actually,  "she made an mistake, and then another... and then another... and then another ... and then another ...and then another ...and then another"  If at any point she had stopped making mistakes the patient would not have died.

That is the difference between all of us who "make a mistake", because there is nearly always another safety check that checks us.

Yeah I wonder where the line is. "You made 8 mistakes in this medication administration so your good. But 9 well 9 would be a problem".

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2 minutes ago, Wuzzie said:

Yeah I wonder where the line is. "You made 8 mistakes in this medication administration so your good. But 9 well 9 would be a problem".

If only she had made just  7

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16 minutes ago, mtmkjr said:

@Horseshoe I just watched the videos you posted...

In his passionate defense of the nurse, ZDoggMD said, "she made a mistake." As if she is just like any of us.

But actually,  "she made an mistake, and then another... and then another... and then another ... and then another ...and then another ...and then another"  If at any point she had stopped making mistakes the patient would not have died.

That is the difference between all of us who "make a mistake", because there is nearly always another safety check that checks us.

That’s what makes her case different than the other two cases I know of a medication error that led to criminal charges. In both past cases, there were clear breakdown in practicing as a reasonably prudent nurse but the contributing factors were obvious (poorly legible hand written physician order, nurse working a double the day before). I still invoke inattentional blindness but I’m hoping to hear more about what her distractions were (the orientee asking questions, her obsessing over an upcoming procedure she was being asked to attend to in the ED?). 

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32 minutes ago, juan de la cruz said:

That’s what makes her case different than the other two cases I know of a medication error that led to criminal charges. In both past cases, there were clear breakdown in practicing as a reasonably prudent nurse but the contributing factors were obvious (poorly legible hand written physician order, nurse working a double the day before). I still invoke inattentional blindness but I’m hoping to hear more about what her distractions were (the orientee asking questions, her obsessing over an upcoming procedure she was being asked to attend to in the ED?). 

We *may* get to hear her side of the story, but it's not likely. If she takes a plea deal, we won't hear it, and if she goes to trial, her lawyer will most likely advise against her testifying. Sometimes defendants insist on testifying, and every once in a while a defense attorney will decide there are some compelling reasons for it, but most usually advise against it. 

I, too, would like to hear what, if any, mitigating circumstances there might be in this case. I don't expect to hear enough of them to make me decide that she wasn't grossly negligent, but of course, there is no way to know for sure.

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3 minutes ago, Horseshoe said:

We *may* get to hear her side of the story, but it's not likely. If she takes a plea deal, we won't hear it, and if she goes to trial, her lawyer will most likely advise against her testifying. Sometimes defendants insist on testifying, and every once in a while a defense attorney will decide there are some compelling reasons for it, but most usually advise against it. 

I, too, would like to hear what, if any, mitigating circumstances there might be in this case. I don't expect to hear enough of them to make me decide that she wasn't grossly negligent, but of course, there is no way to know for sure.

..which in my opinion is one of the downsides of this whole criminal trial circus she now has to face. 

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