Jump to content

NP vs. PA

Posted
dani36 dani36 (New) New

So I am a senior in high school. I been looking at becoming a PA I've done a lot of research about it and found a school and I think it's right for me but I want to work in the NICU. So then I started to look at a NP. I haven't really done research on it so how would I become one? If I'm correct I would need to become a RN first then work for a couple years as a RN then go back for more school? I should also say that when I graduate from high school I will be Medical Assistant.

So I am a senior in high school. I been looking at becoming a PA I've done a lot of research about it and found a school and I think it's right for me but I want to work in the NICU. So then I started to look at a NP. I haven't really done research on it so how would I become one? If I'm correct I would need to become a RN first then work for a couple years as a RN then go back for more school? Also which one should I go to school for? I should also say that when I graduate from high school I will be Medical Assistant.

Thanks!!

Medic2BSN13, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care Transport. Has 8 years experience.

You are correct with the progression of the NP. First you will need to become an RN and earn a bachelors degree. Gain some experience and then complete a masters degree.i have never heard of PA's working in a NICU, but I think generally those positions are filled by NNP's.

As for being a medical assistant, that may help your course work in school, as well as give you experience with working with patients. Unfortunately, it will probably hold little weight when seeking employment as a NICU nurse. MA's are used in outpatient facilities, but not in hospitals. Good luck!

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

The pathway to both PA and NP is similar:

1. Finish high school and apply to undergrad.

2. Complete undergrad education with the appropriate major (nursing for NP, normally hard science for PA).

3. Apply to graduate school and graduate with a masters or a doctorate.

4. Pass a national board exam and get licensed to practice.

It's a long road, make sure you like it first!

SopranoKris, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 6 years experience.

The other thing to consider is the medical model vs. the nursing model of learning you will undertake. PA will follow the medical model, NP will follow the nursing model. You need to research both and see which one appeals to you more.

It is a great thing that you have a career goal in mind already! I believe I read an article and it said that the degree requirement for nurse practioners might be changing( from masters degree to doctorate) by a certain year. You're correct on the part about starting out as an RN. You should aim to complete a BSN program since it will help you reach your goal. Good luck :D

Edited by dorkypanda
Spelling error

If I'm not mistaken, I read somewhere saying that the degree requirement for NP will be a doctorate degree by a certain year.

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Welcome!

duplicate threads merged as per the TOS.

I know the situation may be different, since I'm in MN, but I was weighing my options on this as well. The university of Minnesota has a BSN to DNP program 3 years in length that you can begin immediately following graduation from the BSN. There are two private schools out here that offer PA masters programs as well. The University of Minnesota's BSN feeds into both of the PA programs as well as their own DNP program. Unfortunately, I was denied admission to the University of Minnesota on account of my HS academic record, which was deplorable. Even a 31 on the ACT and 12 years of separation from HS couldn't help me out. I ended up getting into a for profit school that was accredited that appears to feed into the PA programs, but may not feed into the DNP program. I can use my GI bill to get through my BSN at the for-profit school, but the costs of the PA and DNP programs are staggering, looking at about $80-90k. I guess I'll grab the BSN and see where I'm at from there. Getting the BSN rather than a BS in a hard science sets me up to be able to work after my initial 4 years of study in case I cannot afford to continue education right off the bat.