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NP

Posted

Specializes in sepsis/pul. Has 12 years experience.

I've been debating to go back for NP for a while now, it's always been in the back of my mind. Some nurses more experienced than me said that they make more than NPs and there really isn't a point in going back to school. I also have a lot of loans so I'm not sure if its worth it. Also, I've heard the jobs are saturated now and its hard to find practicums. Do you agree?

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

1 hour ago, girlwithnoname said:

I've been debating to go back for NP for a while now, it's always been in the back of my mind. Some nurses more experienced than me said that they make more than NPs and there really isn't a point in going back to school. I also have a lot of loans so I'm not sure if its worth it. Also, I've heard the jobs are saturated now and its hard to find practicums. Do you agree?

Yes I agree. This is especially true in suburban/rural areas where every other nurse on the floor is in NP school. If you are willing to move to a rural or small town area you might have a better shot.

Yeah practicums are hard to find because no hospital or clinic wants to take the productivity hit especially when many NP students are at meaningless online school. DO you think a local hospital is going to find a slot for med student from the city med school or the rando NP student going to a online school based on the other side of the country? What other medical profession makes the STUDENTS find their clinicals? The answer is none. NP education is overall poor and downright embarrassing when physicians other folks ask about it.

The NP ship has sailed. If you care about a fat check, NP isn't the way to go. You have to REALLY like the job

Edited by Numenor

babyNP., APRN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

I would argue that it depends on what kind of NP you want to be. PMHNP has a shortage and pays well, for example.

It’s true that if you wait a long time to become a NP you may not make much more $$ but not if you’re only a few years in. I made about $75k as a RN in the NICU in 2014 and my first job as a NNP I got paid $95k. Now my base salary is $160k, much more than I’d ever make as a RN.

But there’s also lifestyle to consider as well. I’m less stressed out as a provider than as a nurse. This may seem ironic, but in the provider role I’m cushioned from the daily stresses of being “on” with parents my entire shift (I love talking with parents but some parents can be a bit draining and spending 30 minutes with one set is different than spending 12 hours with them), don’t have to ask permission to go to the bathroom, and it’s nice to have my own office to have some downtime. Plus I get much better parking and my paid time off is at the top of the accrual scale versus if I was a nurse I’d have to wait 10 years to get to that accrual.

As far as the school goes, you need to do your research and go to a reputable school. I chose a brick and mortar one that fully arranged my clinical sites. I think it’s downright criminal that schools take student money and then don’t set up clinical sites for them.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

I agree with both posters above. In general, your friend was right for the most part. However, there are some exceptions -- and some factors that vary depending on where you live, what type of school you choose, what specific specialty you choose, etc.

For example, I work in a children's hospital. I know some people who had years of NICU, PICU, or peds experience who had their preceptorships all lined up with physicians they already knew before going back to school. Some even had jobs lined up with those same physicians before starting school. A few even had their educations paid for by the hospital because of their need for more NNP's and acute care PNP's !

That's a very different situation than a nurse without a lot of experience who doesn't have any established relationships with physicians who starts school on her own to become an FNP or PNP. We have an over-supply of those in our community and those people often have trouble finding preceptors and/or jobs after graduation.

But the situation might be very different in another region -- a region without a lot of young staff nurses all going to schools trying to earn the same degree.

MikeFNPC, MSN

Specializes in FNP.

I make far more than any RN I know, and work about 50% of what they do. When I was an RN (over 20 years), I couldn't even come close to what I started at as an NP. And, this is the case with every NP I know.

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

On 6/9/2020 at 8:21 PM, MikeFNPC said:

I make far more than any RN I know, and work about 50% of what they do. When I was an RN (over 20 years), I couldn't even come close to what I started at as an NP. And, this is the case with every NP I know.

It REALLY depends on the union and where you live. A NP starting where I live makes 105K, I made this as a nurse with 6 years experience and very little OT

New NP grad here! I'm applying for NP positions now, and there is NOTHING out there. Sorry to discourage you, but it's true... So much saturation from schools pumping out NPs left and right and admitting everyone who walks through the door. Do NOT go to NP school - it is a waste of time and money!

umbdude, MSN, NP

Specializes in Psych/Mental Health. Has 4 years experience.

6 minutes ago, AnonPandaNurse said:

New NP grad here! I'm applying for NP positions now, and there is NOTHING out there. Sorry to discourage you, but it's true... So much saturation from schools pumping out NPs left and right and admitting everyone who walks through the door. Do NOT go to NP school - it is a waste of time and money!

Just curious what your specialty is and how many jobs have you applied to?

FNP, applied to over 50 jobs by now. Willing to go anywhere in the country. If you have any tips or know any openings, please share.

umbdude, MSN, NP

Specializes in Psych/Mental Health. Has 4 years experience.

On 6/9/2020 at 2:21 AM, babyNP. said:

PMHNP has a shortage and pays well, for example.

This isn't entirely true anymore. Jobs are there, but the number of PMHNP test-takers tripled between 2016-2019 and number of PMHNP-BC doubled during same period (per ANCC). My area doesn't have a shortage and it's not easy to find jobs, and I'm hearing the same from those in larger cities. I am a new grad psych NP have been aggressively looking.

There are insanely few barriers to becoming a PMHNP (low-to-no GPA requirement, no psych RN experience needed, easy ANCC board exam) and diploma mills can pump out hundreds of students each semester. The word (about pay) has gotten out and I have little doubt that psych will saturate more broadly in the next ~5 years.

umbdude, MSN, NP

Specializes in Psych/Mental Health. Has 4 years experience.

30 minutes ago, AnonPandaNurse said:

FNP, applied to over 50 jobs by now. Willing to go anywhere in the country. If you have any tips or know any openings, please share.

Sorry I don't have any special wisdom. But if you are able to move, just keep applying and be patient, and know the shortage areas. Covid hits primary care clinics particularly hard. It's frustrating for sure.

babyNP., APRN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

9 minutes ago, umbdude said:

This isn't entirely true anymore. Jobs are there, but the number of PMHNP test-takers tripled between 2016-2019 and number of PMHNP-BC doubled during same period (per ANCC). My area doesn't have a shortage and it's not easy to find jobs, and I'm hearing the same from those in larger cities. I am a new grad psych NP have been aggressively looking.

There are insanely few barriers to becoming a PMHNP (low-to-no GPA requirement, no psych RN experience needed, easy ANCC board exam) and diploma mills can pump out hundreds of students each semester. The word (about pay) has gotten out and I have little doubt that psych will saturate more broadly in the next ~5 years.

Thanks for sharing. I guess my field is the lone holdout? Although the board exams don't require NICU experience, all of the schools that offer neonatal NP programs do and nearly all require at least 2 years experience (I have a spreadsheet that I created looking at this).

umbdude, MSN, NP

Specializes in Psych/Mental Health. Has 4 years experience.

1 minute ago, babyNP. said:

Thanks for sharing. I guess my field is the lone holdout? Although the board exams don't require NICU experience, all of the schools that offer neonatal NP programs do and nearly all require at least 2 years experience (I have a spreadsheet that I created looking at this).

It's hard to saturate NNP because you absolutely need strong interest in order to get those 2+ years of NICU experience, and there just aren't many NNP programs out there to begin with (e.g. I think there's only 1 NNP program in my state and we have 8+ NP schools not including online schools).

babyNP., APRN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

2 minutes ago, umbdude said:

 It's hard to saturate NNP because you absolutely need strong interest in order to get those 2+ years of NICU experience, and there just aren't many NNP programs out there to begin with (e.g. I think there's only 1 NNP program in my state and we have 8+ NP schools not including online schools).

True. There's only 38 schools +/- each year. There was a period a few years back when a bunch shut down but we've had some new ones open since.

noyesno, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Medicine. Has 11 years experience.

I'm a newish NP. Started my first job in October 2019.

I work in family practice.

Better pay and better quality of life than hospital RN (did that for 9 years).

No regrets here.

verene, MSN

Specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

On 6/11/2020 at 12:31 PM, umbdude said:

This isn't entirely true anymore. Jobs are there, but the number of PMHNP test-takers tripled between 2016-2019 and number of PMHNP-BC doubled during same period (per ANCC). My area doesn't have a shortage and it's not easy to find jobs, and I'm hearing the same from those in larger cities. I am a new grad psych NP have been aggressively looking.

Yes, and unfortunately many of those coming in don't necessarily have a great understanding of what they are getting into with psych or are only wanting the "cushy" psych jobs -- which are actually not as easy to get as a newbie. I'm thankful I did my research before hand and chose a school that has both a good reputation and which sets students some pretty realistic expectations of first jobs.

Hoping some of those going into the field for the money or because "psych is easy" will leave and that will help some of the saturation issues. In the mean time though I worry what it will do to our patients who need people who CARE and who WANT to work in this field, and to PMHNP salaries and reputations.

I'm a new grad as well and I LOVE my job (most days at least... this last week was really, really rough), but I also knew what I was getting into and had fairly reasonable expectations. At my current employer people tend to either last less than a year because they aren't prepared for the population/workload/realities of this setting/population or 5+ years because it actually is a pretty darn good place to work if you like the patient population. It's rather polarizing that way. I'm almost a year in and can pretty easily see myself sticking around several more years.

If you are wiling to relocate I do know of a few places hiring, but the market is definitely dried up with COVID right now.

To the OP: I do make more as an NP than I did as an RN but there is definitely an invisible toll in the weight of responsibility to your patients and to the staff you work with that I don't think many realize comes with the leadership role of NP. You have to WANT the NP role and not just the NP money. On the best days I'd be completely fine doing this job for RN pay. On the worst days... you will completely understand why you can't do this job for money alone as it will never fully compensate the heavy, invisible toll of the work.

Edited by verene

Scrubsof3, BSN, RN

Has 9 years experience.

On 6/9/2020 at 2:21 AM, babyNP. said:

I would argue that it depends on what kind of NP you want to be. PMHNP has a shortage and pays well, for example.

It’s true that if you wait a long time to become a NP you may not make much more $$ but not if you’re only a few years in. I made about $75k as a RN in the NICU in 2014 and my first job as a NNP I got paid $95k. Now my base salary is $160k, much more than I’d ever make as a RN.

But there’s also lifestyle to consider as well. I’m less stressed out as a provider than as a nurse. This may seem ironic, but in the provider role I’m cushioned from the daily stresses of being “on” with parents my entire shift (I love talking with parents but some parents can be a bit draining and spending 30 minutes with one set is different than spending 12 hours with them), don’t have to ask permission to go to the bathroom, and it’s nice to have my own office to have some downtime. Plus I get much better parking and my paid time off is at the top of the accrual scale versus if I was a nurse I’d have to wait 10 years to get to that accrual.

As far as the school goes, you need to do your research and go to a reputable school. I chose a brick and mortar one that fully arranged my clinical sites. I think it’s downright criminal that schools take student money and then don’t set up clinical sites for them.

Hi does anybody mind sharing a couple of good schools with good good NP programs, now I’m not sure so I continue my education

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

1 hour ago, Scrubsof3 said:

Hi does anybody mind sharing a couple of good schools with good good NP programs, now I’m not sure so I continue my education

Too vague. What are you willing to pay? Are you willing to move?