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Not sure if I like where I am working

The place of employment is very toxic, it consist of clicky nurses, and some that would throw a new person under a bus, what would you do in the circumstance? I am a quiet, timid, shy person. I want to work in an environment that is positive and supportive especially to the newbies that are full of questions and wonder. Don't get me wrong there are some really great nurses too, however the toxic ones outweighs the very few that are supportive and willing to help a person when needed. So because I am casual I usually on the shift with clicky nurses. Once in a while I am lucky to be on a shift with a helpful nurse. How would you deal with this situation. Would you resign from your casual position or stick with it? I just don't want to opt for a career change because of a bad experience. In all honesty I was happier working in retail. what can I do, what would you more experienced nurses recommend?

B52, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Substance Abuse.

I wouldn't quit, unless the environment was really intolerable. My advice is to always ask questions when you have uncertainty. If one colleague is not helpful, seek out another who is. Ask the charge nurse for advice if necessary. Be meticulous in your documentation. You might have to remind the "clicky" nurses that they, too, were once a new nurse. You can be assertive without being aggressive. Practice in front of a mirror if you have to.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

Would you resign from your casual position or stick with it? I just don't want to opt for a career change because of a bad experience.
When it comes to jobs, I live by a couple of rules of thumb:

1. I never quit without another job lined up (I am not independently wealthy)

2. I never quit on other peoples' terms (read: I don't let people bully me out of a job)

my advice is to do your job and thats it ( be a wonderful nurse) THEN go home and parrrrrrrrtay!

when you give off the energy that your happy and not bothered by their BS, they will get the point and keep it moving.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

when you give off the energy that your happy and not bothered by their BS, they will get the point and keep it moving.
Your point is salient. When people see you sweating in the seat of your pants, they continue to pull their shenanigans because they're empowered by getting to your head.

As the old song goes: "Don't let nobody get you down..."

Is this casual position your second job or your primary job. If it is your primary job, then make it work for now.

How long have you worked there? If it is less than six months, give it time. You build confidence from overcoming adversity.

Are you new to nursing? If you are new, the stress level on you will be high no matter where you work. If you are experienced, maybe you can do some shadowing in different places to get a feel of where you would rather work.

Are the cliquey nurses actively targeting you? Unless you are a direct target of personal attacks, learn to ignore the cliquey nurses while remaining pleasant and helpful at work. If you don't have enough of a life outside of work, build one. Surround yourself with a strong core of people who enhance your life.

If this is a casual job, only you can decide if the benefits of a paycheck outweigh the jr. high lunch room stuff.

When you are on with a helpful nurse, you can ask if you can run some things by them--if you have questions, comments, concerns--as to where you can find information if you need it, any and all pointers--keep it to the work, and not the "the other nurses are so unhelpful" stuff. Stick to the job, and try and not internalize what is not your issue--you do not have to go home with these people.

If you are in LTC, half the battle--in my opinion--is knowing who the residents are, how they take their medication, and finding them to administer the same. If you are in a different setting, do what you have to do--get a routine down, and focus on the patients as opposed to the bru-ha-ha.

Best wishes!

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