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Night nurse sound asleep!

Private Duty   (7,720 Views 27 Comments)
by maryen maryen (Member) Member

maryen has 18 years experience .

2,703 Profile Views; 95 Posts

I had something happen for the first time and would like to know if I am overreacting and suggestions on how to proceed. When I arrived for am shift, the clients front door was locked. I knocked a few times and the night shift nurse answered the door and let me in. My knocking had clearly woken her up, she was groggy and asked me what time it was. I told her 7a and she stated no it is 6:30a. I showed her the time on my phone and she said her alarm had not gone off. The clients room was in disarray and none of the duties were completed- empty suction canister, dirty linens etc... She did complete the tasks and left. I was so taken aback that I did not say anything to her. I feel like I want to confront her but she is not very good at getting along with co- workers. Is this something I should report to the RN case supervisor? Or should I discuss it with her myself?

Not sure how to best proceed and would love to know what you would do.

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2,819 Posts; 24,962 Profile Views

I would report this to the RN case manager. This is unacceptable in my opinion.

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3 Followers; 36,914 Posts; 97,807 Profile Views

I would not discuss it with her. I would make note of it but I would not go out of my way to tell the supervisor unless this becomes more of a problem or happens every shift. I can almost guarantee you that you will be making trouble for yourself with the agency and supervisor instead of correcting a situation. The supervisor and agency do not want to hear anything. If the client is allowing this you are just making enemies for yourself. Nine times out of ten the clients are aware and allow the behavior or else they complain but do nothing.

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2,819 Posts; 24,962 Profile Views

caliotter3 is correct. I have been gone from private duty nursing for a year now. I forgot that the agencies don't give a damn and don't want to hear about any complaints. I work at LTC now and the situation is the same. I have made valid complaints to LTC management and no one cares and nothing is done about it. The problem is me. When will I learn that no one cares and that's just the way it is in today's world? The best way for me to keep my job is to keep my mouth shut.

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SDALPN specializes in Peds(PICU, NICU float), PDN, ICU.

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caliotter3 is correct. I have been gone from private duty nursing for a year now. I forgot that the agencies don't give a damn and don't want to hear about any complaints. I work at LTC now and the situation is the same. I have made valid complaints to LTC management and no one cares and nothing is done about it. The problem is me. When will I learn that no one cares and that's just the way it is in today's world? The best way for me to keep my job is to keep my mouth shut.

I have that same problem. One problem I don't have is not being able to sleep because I let something go that could harm a pt.

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maryen has 18 years experience.

95 Posts; 2,703 Profile Views

I would not discuss it with her. I would make note of it but I would not go out of my way to tell the supervisor unless this becomes more of a problem or happens every shift. I can almost guarantee you that you will be making trouble for yourself with the agency and supervisor instead of correcting a situation. The supervisor and agency do not want to hear anything. If the client is allowing this you are just making enemies for yourself. Nine times out of ten the clients are aware and allow the behavior or else they complain but do nothing.

I think you hit the nail on the head! If it happens again, I will bring it up with her directly.

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3 Followers; 36,914 Posts; 97,807 Profile Views

I worked long term on a case where the two night nurses came there to sleep. Both were very open about it. Pillows, blankets, and pajamas in one case (she made this her home away from home). The agency was well aware and did absolutely nothing. I would get very angry because the child was to be ready to go in the morning on those days I had to come early to accompany him to an appt. He would usually be in a soaked diaper, dirty, wearing his night clothes. I had to clean him up, dress him, and transfer him to the wheelchair. The night nurse slept. Both night nurses remained on the case. I left the case and the agency no longer gives me work. Fair? I don't think so.

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PerfectlyPlump is a ADN, RN and specializes in Peds, developmental disability.

181 Posts; 5,642 Profile Views

I worked long term on a case where the two night nurses came there to sleep. Both were very open about it. Pillows, blankets, and pajamas in one case (she made this her home away from home). The agency was well aware and did absolutely nothing. I would get very angry because the child was to be ready to go in the morning on those days I had to come early to accompany him to an appt. He would usually be in a soaked diaper, dirty, wearing his night clothes. I had to clean him up, dress him, and transfer him to the wheelchair. The night nurse slept. Both night nurses remained on the case. I left the case and the agency no longer gives me work. Fair? I don't think so.

What a pig.

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PerfectlyPlump is a ADN, RN and specializes in Peds, developmental disability.

181 Posts; 5,642 Profile Views

Being selfish is natural. Being exceptional is...exceptional!

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390 Posts; 10,361 Profile Views

I can't even fathom this. As a parent, I'd absolutely want you to tell your DON if you didn't want to tell me. I would never expect you to confront her.

I can understand where Caliotter is coming from but what happens if this child dies because alarms obviously don't wake her up?

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PerfectlyPlump is a ADN, RN and specializes in Peds, developmental disability.

181 Posts; 5,642 Profile Views

Wouldn't the BON want to know as well?

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Adele_Michal7 has 5 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Pediatric.

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To the OP: where is the nurse sleeping? On a couch? In a bed?

Where are the parents?

Do you think they know?

Would you feel comfortable informing them?

Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com

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