Problem with employment for new BSN graduate

  1. Hi

    I am about to start an accelerated 15months BSN program in SUNY downstate this June. I am a working professional who is about to give up my stable paying job and take out a big loan to go back to school to be a nurse.
    I am the bread winner of my family.

    Lately, I have been reading a lot of threads about NYC hospital having hiring freeze or they simply refused to hire anyone who doesn't have at least one year of med/surg experience.

    I am really getting concerned. Is the job market really that bad for new graduate? When thye said they want u to have at least one year of experience, does volunteer experience count or it has to be actually work experience for one year?
    I really cannot afford to be unemployed for more than 2 months after I graduate or my whole family will be kicked out.
    I have been working and going to classes fulltime to do all my pre-requisite to get myself into the accelerated program. Should I change my goal to be a PA instead? Or the job market is just as bad?
    Are nurses no longer in shortage?
    Any honest input would really be appreciated.
  2. Visit immanuel11421 profile page

    About immanuel11421

    Joined: May '09; Posts: 8

    14 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    When they say they want experience, they are talking about paid experience. If there is any way that you can work while you go to school you probably should. Many people do. And yes, there is a problem with employment after graduation. You may have to move to find a job. You will need to start looking before your graduate.
  4. by   immanuel11421
    But how can u get 'paid experience 'as a RN before u even graduate? So, does that mean I have to get a 'paid experience' working as a nurse technician or LPN or any hospital job answering the phone?

    I have been working a business professional for years and this would be my second career. It's not like I am 21 years old kid who just get out of college for the first time. Would that help?

    Cause what I have been seeing is minimum of 'ONE YEAR OF MED/SURGICAL UNIT EXPERIENCE' for RN job posting.

    I am really worry. Any hospital hiring new graduate?

    If I am willing to move, what state is more open to hiring new BSN graduate?
  5. by   singas0ng
    Well, there are still some hospitals in the area that are hiring such as New York Presbyterian. The best thing you can do right now knowing how the economy is, is to make yourself stand out from the crowd. If you can do externship or a patient care associate job while attending school, hospitals tend to really like that.
    It also helps you in acquiring a job in that hospital as hospitals like Memorial Sloan Kettering seems to hire first within their externship program nursing students. Its a difficult market, but I honestly feel that it's just as hard in other fields. Stick with it, and hopefully in 2 years it'll turn around and by being proactive and prepping yourself before you graduate, you can definitely find a job!

    Good LUCK
  6. by   elkpark
    When hospitals talk about "experience" in connection with RN positions, they mean experience as a nurse -- they aren't interested in any other kind of experience. Your maturity and life experience might give you an edge over a younger new grad, but I'm afraid you won't get any "credit" for your previous career. This is a concept that is often v. hard for second career nursing students to accept -- it's understandably hard, as a mature, seasoned adult, to embrace the idea of having to start over "from scratch," and have everything else you've accomplished in your life count for (practically) nothing.

    Also, the nursing "shortage" was always overstated and many of us have been saying for years that it was nonsense. Plenty of older threads here on that subject! Now, with the economic crash, what "shortage" there was has basically evaporated in most areas. Hospitals have reduced hiring, and many nurses who didn't "have" to work before have returned to the workplace. Even experienced RNs are now having trouble finding employment in many areas. As caliotter noted, lots of new grads are finding they have to relocate to an area that does have a shortage to find a job.

    This is not a particularly good time to be going into nursing. However, things are sure to turn around eventually (if not, we're all screwed, aren't we). If nursing is really what you want to do, there will be a way to make things work out. Best wishes for your journey!
  7. by   NurseFairy
    I'm going to second everyone's statements here. I have 17 months experience in a Medical ICU and I am having a VERY difficult time finding a new job! When I graduated 2 years ago, I was recruited at my pinning ceremony. I never even had to send my resume out. Things are really bad out there now, especially for new grads.

    You can hope it'll turn around by the time you graduate, however, it sounds like if you can't get hired right out of graduation then your family will be in some serious hot water.

    Maybe you should rethink giving up your job to do this and maybe do it part-time at night somehow while still keeping your day job.

    Good Luck!
    Sue:smilecoffeecup:
  8. by   immanuel11421
    Hi All,

    Thanks for your feedback.

    I have one week left to decide if I want to start the accelerated nursing program.

    I appreciate your honest input.

    Does anyone know if other positions in medical field such as physician assistant job market is also as uncertain as the current nursing one?

    I certainly do not want all my hard work in taking the science pre-requite to go to waste. Any medical job market out there that's still secure inclduing MD?
    Or the hiring freeze is hospital applies to all positions?
  9. by   immanuel11421
    Hi All,

    Note that the economy and job market looks bleak. But does it make u more marketable if u hold a BSN vs an associate as a RN?

    And can anyone tell me if the market for other positions in healthcare still doing well? Is the hospital hiring PA?
  10. by   NurseFairy
    Quote from immanuel11421
    Hi All,

    Note that the economy and job market looks bleak. But does it make u more marketable if u hold a BSN vs an associate as a RN?

    And can anyone tell me if the market for other positions in healthcare still doing well? Is the hospital hiring PA?
    It seem to me in my current job search that having a BSN with experience makes you more marketable than an ASN/ADN with experience. However, for new grads it seems it doesn't matter right now which degree you have because I haven't run across any hospital hiring new grads.

    I've seen a few ads for PA's, but mostly what I'm seeing advertised is positions for NP's.
  11. by   elkpark
    I hope that the OP will not choose a career based solely (or even primarily) on what health-related occupation is most in demand in one specific, narrow window of time. That will change -- I don't know how, exactly, but I guarantee it will. Whatever occupation you choose will take a big chunk of time, effort, and $$$ to prepare for and enter, and you're (presumably) going to spend much of the rest of your life doing it 40 hours or so a week -- what's the point of going to the trouble and expense to enter an occupation that you're not going to enjoy doing? Do you really want to be looking around for another occupation to pursue in several years, and go through this whole process again?

    IMHO, it makes much more sense to figure out what you want to do, and then find a way to make that choice work for you.
  12. by   immanuel11421
    This is my second career and I chose my first career based on my dream about what I think I would enjoy doing and that was a disaster but I did that for 10 years.
    I lost more things one can imagine for moving to a foreign country to pursue my first career.But that was back when I was single and by myslef and so whatever the sacrifice and consequences was, it was just me.
    Now I have a family and yes, I want to choose jobs somewhat appeals to my interest instead of just money.

    That's why I would never want to be a lawyer or a dentist cause no matter how much u are going to pay me, I have no interest in doing that.

    My real dream is to be a doctor. I am done with my pre-med and was about to apply for med-school but I am having cold-feet.
    I cannot have my family to go through the ordeal/ uncertainties with me for the 4 years of med-school and 4 years of residencies and the $200,000 loan.
    I am happy that I got into an accelearated program for nursing.So, I want to be a RN first and then be a NP. Both PA and NP appeals to me.
    Whichever provides better job opportunities.
  13. by   nycguy
    I not sure about the current job market for NPs versus PA's, however, I do now about SUNY Downstate. I am currently a student in their accelerated program. On one hand, I understand your reluctance to enter the program given that you will have to give up your current career and live off of loans in the midst of this recession. On the other hand, I think that even though the job market for new nurses is very tough now, nursing is still a good career field b/c of its flexibility and keeping in mind that this recession will pass and when it does, employment opportunities for nurses will improve. The magic questions is when - not if b/c things will perk up in time. Whatever decision you make, I wish you luck. Just keep in mind that it is really a blessing to be accepted into SUNY Downstate's accelerated program b/c it is the only public (i.e., affordable) BSN program in New York City. Also, it is possible to work after you complete the initial two summer sessions - I worked and was able to manage school, work and having time for myself, friends and family just fine.
  14. by   Wsmith16
    Quote from NurseFairy
    It seem to me in my current job search that having a BSN with experience makes you more marketable than an ASN/ADN with experience. However, for new grads it seems it doesn't matter right now which degree you have because I haven't run across any hospital hiring new grads.

    I've seen a few ads for PA's, but mostly what I'm seeing advertised is positions for NP's.
    NurseFairy,

    I have to agree with you I am an ADN grad & I have been on 3 interviews while some of my friends who graduated with BSN are either not working or can't secure a job in the hospitals. This is affecting ALL of us. My previous-degree meant zilch to the recruiter --I thought I'd have a leg up because I had a bachelors in other field. I was WRONG.

    The 1st interview I went on was back in JAn this hosp did not pay as well as others so many people overlooked it so they hired me--then took it away due to budegt cuts then hired me again.

    The other two other interviews were strictly due to networking/contacts/friends who woked at the particular hospital they put in a good word for me.

    It seems the only way a new grad will get a job is by who he/she knows or if they previously worked there and lots of luck.

    To the OP, nursing is probably a better bet then your current job anyway because once you have experience the opp'ty will open up. But as with a any field you have to really network to get a job.

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