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new grad nursing resume critique

Hey! I have recently graduated from a local community college with an ADN and I'm enrolled in a bachelor's program for my BSN. While at my community college we had to make a resume as a graded assignment. Unfortunately, this resume doesn't really apply since I am no longer a student and my qualifications have changed. I have tried to edit it myself, but I would like some outside opinions and constructive criticism. Thanks! Please excuse any formatting errors, there's only so much I can do to make it look right on here! it is formatted correctly on my computer! haha (also if this resume is totally lame, it's not my fault! this is how the teacher wanted it formatted for the assignment lol)

dana_saur

123 Park Avenue

Anytown, NY, 12345

(xxx) xxx-xxxx

notreallymyemail@yahoo.com

Objective:

To secure a full time position as a Registered Nurse at ::Local children's

hospital::

Licensure/Certification:

New York State Registered Nurse license # XXXXXX, Current-2017

American Heart Association CPR Certification, Current-2016

Education:

Random College, Anytown NY, 12345.

Bachelor in Science Degree - Nursing.

Anticipate graduation May 2015.

Random Community College, Anytown, NY, 12345.

Associate in Applied Science Degree - Nursing.

Graduated May 2014

GPA: 3.46.

Work Experience:

1/08 to present:

Local Grocery Store, 123 Main Street, Anytown, NY, 12345

Position: Commercial bakery customer service representative.

Responsibilities: Communication with customers via phone and in person. Management of the department during shift. Time management. Multitasking. Attention to detail and accuracy regarding product rotation. Prioritization.

Awards and Membership:

Student Nurses Association - RCC

Member of National Honor Society

Dean's List - Random College 2010 - 2011

Dean's List - RCC Spring 2013

References: Available upon request.

RunBabyRN specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

I don't know what you e-mail address is, but make sure it's something like legal_name@gmail.com, rather than hot_naked_chick@gmail.com. I assume you've done this, but it's worth mentioning. It's surprising what people will put on a resume, when e-mail addresses are free!

Remove your GPA. Few employers require it, and unless it's stellar, no need to put it.

Are you working on PALS or STABLE? Doing any volunteering? Have you done any babysitting? Since you're looking at a children's hospital, it might be good to think about these things. Any additional certifications or volunteering you can do will be very helpful. If you have the time right now, try volunteering at a free clinic.

You've done well applying your grocery store experience to nursing skills. Good!

B52 specializes in Psych, Substance Abuse.

You should include skills you have learned. Can you start IVs, interpret basic EKGs, insert urinary catheters. It would also be a good idea to include your clinicals as experience. If your school has a reputation for being tough I'd keep the GPA.

@runbabyRN haha yes I have a professional email. I got one back when I was applying for college =]

I was looking into PALS (I need to find the time and money first haha) because I do want to work with kids but what is STABLE? I've never heard of that.

I unfortunately haven't done any volunteering, I will definitely look into that also. However, would babysitting be appropriate to put on a resume? I haven't babysat since I was 17 in high school (I'm 22 now) So I do have experience, but I didn't think that seemed "professional" to put on a resume. Thanks for your input!!

Edited by blah_blah_blah

@RNdh according to the school I went to, it's the best and toughest in the area (however, that's coming from the school so of course they're going to say that haha). I started with over 300 students and graduated with like 120, but that doesn't really mean much. Thanks for your input!

Edited by blah_blah_blah

RunBabyRN specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

@runbabyRN haha yes I have a professional email. I got one back when I was applying for college =]

I was looking into PALS (I need to find the time and money first haha) because I do want to work with kids but what is STABLE? I've never heard of that.

I unfortunately haven't done any volunteering, I will definitely look into that also. However, would babysitting be appropriate to put on a resume? I haven't babysat since I was 17 in high school (I'm 22 now) So I do have experience, but I didn't think that seemed "professional" to put on a resume. Thanks for your input!!

The S.T.A.B.L.E. Program

That link will give you great info about STABLE which, if you want to work in peds, might be helpful. NRP might also be good if you're open to NICU. Taking a 12-lead EKG class wouldn't hurt, either.

The only reason I bring up babysitting is because you want to work in peds. Showing an interest in peds, and that you've cared for children (maybe even provided some first aid? Educated them? Soothed them when they've been upset?) can be relevant experience. It's a matter of wording and MAKING it relevant, the way you did with your other experience. Maybe others would disagree with me, but I think that, given your lack of other experience, it might be a good way to build up your resume.

I also agree that you should list more in your school clinical experience. Where did you do each rotation? How many hours? For your peds rotation, get into the experience you had. I know that peds rotations varied WIDELY for our program, so putting what you did and where you were can be very helpful. Some classmates were in home care, I was in an ED. We have no peds unit in our area, so I was one of the few with the closest thing to an inpatient experience (and none of the peds I had were admitted).

As far as skills, I would only list stuff that puts you above other new grads. However, it seems, from reading on here, not all schools still do IVs, so it would be good to list if you did it. Did you get any cool experiences that stand out?

Also, add Dana_Saur, RN to your name. :)

The S.T.A.B.L.E. Program

That link will give you great info about STABLE which, if you want to work in peds, might be helpful. NRP might also be good if you're open to NICU. Taking a 12-lead EKG class wouldn't hurt, either.

The only reason I bring up babysitting is because you want to work in peds. Showing an interest in peds, and that you've cared for children (maybe even provided some first aid? Educated them? Soothed them when they've been upset?) can be relevant experience. It's a matter of wording and MAKING it relevant, the way you did with your other experience. Maybe others would disagree with me, but I think that, given your lack of other experience, it might be a good way to build up your resume.

I also agree that you should list more in your school clinical experience. Where did you do each rotation? How many hours? For your peds rotation, get into the experience you had. I know that peds rotations varied WIDELY for our program, so putting what you did and where you were can be very helpful. Some classmates were in home care, I was in an ED. We have no peds unit in our area, so I was one of the few with the closest thing to an inpatient experience (and none of the peds I had were admitted).

As far as skills, I would only list stuff that puts you above other new grads. However, it seems, from reading on here, not all schools still do IVs, so it would be good to list if you did it. Did you get any cool experiences that stand out?

Also, add Dana_Saur, RN to your name. :)

Funny you mention the NICU. That is actually where I was hoping to end up one day! during my peds rotation I had an observation day in the NICU and fell in love. Of course I have always wanted to work in there since I started school, but my experience there really solidified that for me. The hospital I'm applying at is the one I had my peds rotation too so maybe that can help me out. I also had pediatric experience when I shadowed an elementary school nurse for my community based nursing unit for school.

I'm actually in a weird nursing program called a 1+2+1 nursing program meaning that I spent one year at my 4 year school and got pre-reqs out of the way (A&P, chem, stats, holistic nursing, psych, random electives because its a liberal arts school, etc) 2 years at 1 of 3 other colleges (2/3 were community colleges and you got to pick which one to attend) for your ADN then you return to the 4 year school for your bachelors. Anyway, when I came back to my 4 year school this fall, I was absolutely shocked that the students that went to the other community college were not taught IV's. they LEARNED about gauge sizes and technique, but never practiced on a mannequin let alone a real person. How can you not teach student NURSES how to insert IVs? the clinical after I passed my IV insertion evaluation, I inserted an IV.

Back on topic, how would you suggest that I include clinical experience, babysitting and nursing skills on my resume? Just make another heading for clinical experience and one for nursing skills? Thanks again I really appreciate your input!

Edited by blah_blah_blah
grammar

RunBabyRN specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

Funny you mention the NICU. That is actually where I was hoping to end up one day! during my peds rotation I had an observation day in the NICU and fell in love. Of course I have always wanted to work in there since I started school, but my experience there really solidified that for me. The hospital I'm applying at is the one I had my peds rotation too so maybe that can help me out. I also had pediatric experience when I shadowed an elementary school nurse for my community based nursing unit for school.

I'm actually in a weird nursing program called a 1+2+1 nursing program meaning that I spent one year at my 4 year school and got pre-reqs out of the way (A&P, chem, stats, holistic nursing, psych, random electives because its a liberal arts school, etc) 2 years at 1 of 3 other colleges (2/3 were community colleges and you got to pick which one to attend) for your ADN then you return to the 4 year school for your bachelors. Anyway, when I came back to my 4 year school this fall, I was absolutely shocked that the students that went to the other community college were not taught IV's. they LEARNED about gauge sizes and technique, but never practiced on a mannequin let alone a real person. How can you not teach student NURSES how to insert IVs? the clinical after I passed my IV insertion evaluation, I inserted an IV.

Back on topic, how would you suggest that I include clinical experience, babysitting and nursing skills on my resume? Just make another heading for clinical experience and one for nursing skills? Thanks again I really appreciate your input!

There was a whole thread in one of the student forums asking whether or not students practiced IVs on one another (seems to be about 50/50), and another somewhere asking if people learned IVs in school. It's weird to think that some schools don't, but for whatever reason, some don't. I cannot IMAGINE having to learn that on the floor. It takes so many repetitions to get it! But I digress.

Here's a copy and paste (with edits!) of my description of my clinical experience:

Senior Preceptorship, Local mid-size hospital, My town, CA, January-April 2014, 185 hours

Mother baby unit- performed the role of a registered nurse under the supervision of a preceptor RN, providing comprehensive, culturally-sensitive care for up to 4 couplets and their families; assessed mothers and newborns after vaginal and cesarean births; administered IV, oral, ocular and parenteral medications; checked blood sugars using Accudata; tended to surgical incisions and skin tears; managed complications such as psychiatric diagnoses, incarceration, CPS involvement, maternal and newborn blood glucose abnormalities, hypermagnesemia, cerebral palsy, jaundice, reflux, cold stress, drug use, subgaleal hemorrhage, apnea, uterine deformity, anuria, urethral trauma, chorioamnionitis, and postpartum hemorrhage; referred patients to community resources and providers; provided education regarding parenting, self-care, newborn health and feeding; provided lactation support and guidance.

Other clinical experience included:

Medical/Surgical-Local mid-size hospital, 270 hours. Included rotations in ED, ICU, cardiac cath lab and surgical units.

Maternal Child- Local mid-size hospital, 90 hours

Mental Health- various locations throughout this County, 90 hours

Pediatrics- Local trauma center ED; Poor Neighborhood Schools, 90 hours

Community health- Poor Neighborhood Schools, 90 hours

I think it's important to list the kind of stuff you really got to do in your preceptorship, as you are usually doing a lot independently, if you're doing well.

For the babysitting, think about what you had to do that relates to nursing. You probably had to calm children, put them to sleep, provide first aid PRN, that sort of thing. Tease out anything you did, and then work on the wording to make it relate.

I wouldn't do a skills section unless you did a ton of something. For example, I only did one or two wound vacs (still something some people didn't get to do), but I did at least 20-30 Foley insertions, so I list that in my skills summary. I only have a skills summary because I really feel like I have skills that not all new grads have. I have been in healthcare a long time, and I did a lot of things that relate to nursing. I also have a few certs now.

There was a whole thread in one of the student forums asking whether or not students practiced IVs on one another (seems to be about 50/50), and another somewhere asking if people learned IVs in school. It's weird to think that some schools don't, but for whatever reason, some don't. I cannot IMAGINE having to learn that on the floor. It takes so many repetitions to get it! But I digress.

Here's a copy and paste (with edits!) of my description of my clinical experience:

Senior Preceptorship, Local mid-size hospital, My town, CA, January-April 2014, 185 hours

Mother baby unit- performed the role of a registered nurse under the supervision of a preceptor RN, providing comprehensive, culturally-sensitive care for up to 4 couplets and their families; assessed mothers and newborns after vaginal and cesarean births; administered IV, oral, ocular and parenteral medications; checked blood sugars using Accudata; tended to surgical incisions and skin tears; managed complications such as psychiatric diagnoses, incarceration, CPS involvement, maternal and newborn blood glucose abnormalities, hypermagnesemia, cerebral palsy, jaundice, reflux, cold stress, drug use, subgaleal hemorrhage, apnea, uterine deformity, anuria, urethral trauma, chorioamnionitis, and postpartum hemorrhage; referred patients to community resources and providers; provided education regarding parenting, self-care, newborn health and feeding; provided lactation support and guidance.

Other clinical experience included:

Medical/Surgical-Local mid-size hospital, 270 hours. Included rotations in ED, ICU, cardiac cath lab and surgical units.

Maternal Child- Local mid-size hospital, 90 hours

Mental Health- various locations throughout this County, 90 hours

Pediatrics- Local trauma center ED; Poor Neighborhood Schools, 90 hours

Community health- Poor Neighborhood Schools, 90 hours

I think it's important to list the kind of stuff you really got to do in your preceptorship, as you are usually doing a lot independently, if you're doing well.

For the babysitting, think about what you had to do that relates to nursing. You probably had to calm children, put them to sleep, provide first aid PRN, that sort of thing. Tease out anything you did, and then work on the wording to make it relate.

I wouldn't do a skills section unless you did a ton of something. For example, I only did one or two wound vacs (still something some people didn't get to do), but I did at least 20-30 Foley insertions, so I list that in my skills summary. I only have a skills summary because I really feel like I have skills that not all new grads have. I have been in healthcare a long time, and I did a lot of things that relate to nursing. I also have a few certs now.

After reading your clinical experience summary and reading other resume postings where people are discussing their clinical experience and hours spent in each rotation, I feel as though mine seems inadequate. I realize all schools are different and I have graduated from an accredited nursing school, but it seems like other students have done so many more hours than I have. For example, there is no way I spent 90 hours in my maternity rotation. The way my school was for each semester (excluding the first semester where I spent the whole time in a nursing home for geriatrics, only 1 day a week for 7 hours) we rotated between 2-3 settings. Nursing 2 was med/surg and maternity (each clinical was once a week for 7 hours, so i spent maybe 50 hours in those settings) where I was assigned ONE patient for the day, nursing 3 was cardiac/respiratory, ortho/neuro, and peds where we had 3 MAYBE 4 clinicals for 12 hours once a week, so again 48 hours roughly per rotation also with only one patient, and for my last semester I had renal/oncology, endocrine, and mental health with the same time table but I was taking care of 2 patients. Realizing this, do you think listing my clinical experience would hurt rather than help? I also did not do a preceptorship, I don't think my school even offered them. -_-

I feel as though the only experience that I had in clinical that could be beneficial to list is my leadership and delegation rotation that was at the end of my final semester at school. During this rotation, one student would oversee a group of 3 other students and act as the "charge nurse" and make patient assignments (during this rotation each student would have 3 patients), give and receive report, etc. essentially, we acted as a makeshift charge nurse for the other 3 students. halfway through the day "leaders" would switch off so everyone had the chance to be the charge nurse.

what do you think?

RunBabyRN specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

After reading your clinical experience summary and reading other resume postings where people are discussing their clinical experience and hours spent in each rotation, I feel as though mine seems inadequate. I realize all schools are different and I have graduated from an accredited nursing school, but it seems like other students have done so many more hours than I have. For example, there is no way I spent 90 hours in my maternity rotation. The way my school was for each semester (excluding the first semester where I spent the whole time in a nursing home for geriatrics, only 1 day a week for 7 hours) we rotated between 2-3 settings. Nursing 2 was med/surg and maternity (each clinical was once a week for 7 hours, so i spent maybe 50 hours in those settings) where I was assigned ONE patient for the day, nursing 3 was cardiac/respiratory, ortho/neuro, and peds where we had 3 MAYBE 4 clinicals for 12 hours once a week, so again 48 hours roughly per rotation also with only one patient, and for my last semester I had renal/oncology, endocrine, and mental health with the same time table but I was taking care of 2 patients. Realizing this, do you think listing my clinical experience would hurt rather than help? I also did not do a preceptorship, I don't think my school even offered them. -_-

I feel as though the only experience that I had in clinical that could be beneficial to list is my leadership and delegation rotation that was at the end of my final semester at school. During this rotation, one student would oversee a group of 3 other students and act as the "charge nurse" and make patient assignments (during this rotation each student would have 3 patients), give and receive report, etc. essentially, we acted as a makeshift charge nurse for the other 3 students. halfway through the day "leaders" would switch off so everyone had the chance to be the charge nurse.

what do you think?

I think it would be good to put that leadership stuff in your cover letter.

Are there any schools in your area that offer any kind of preceptorship? I know that here, one of the CSUs does a summer rural preceptorship that a lot of my classmates chose to do, in addition to the one offered by our program.

Did you guys do a lot in skills lab? We didn't really have much for skills lab, so I think we made up for that in clinicals. I would still list the hours, because it's good for a manager to see what your background is.

I think it would be good to put that leadership stuff in your cover letter.

Are there any schools in your area that offer any kind of preceptorship? I know that here, one of the CSUs does a summer rural preceptorship that a lot of my classmates chose to do, in addition to the one offered by our program.

Did you guys do a lot in skills lab? We didn't really have much for skills lab, so I think we made up for that in clinicals. I would still list the hours, because it's good for a manager to see what your background is.

As far as I know, there aren't any preceptorship programs in my area but I will definitely research more into it to make sure. I also called around today about PALS and will be taking that certification course in January. Unfortunately, there is no STABLE program in my area. =[

As for lab, we just did the usual nursing skills that I would think every nursing school does. in no particular order we did... Aseptic dressing changes with wound packing, CVAD dressing change, NG tube insertion irrigation and removal, foley/straight cath, bladder irrigation, trach care, trach suctioning, IV starts, IV skills in general like IV pushes, hanging piggy backs, spiking a bag and priming the line, drip rate calculations and setting the drip rate manually, IM and SQ injections, TPN transfusions, blood transfusions (in my area students CANNOT give blood products but we still learned anyway), PO med passes, "block" med passes; i'm not sure if this term is unique to my school, but in skills lab we did a full med pass on a patient, any PO, IM, SQ, IV meds were given because in prior evals they were always separated. one eval was just po, one was just IM/SQ, the other was just IV etc. so this was nice to learn how to put them all together, insulin mixing, hoyer lift, sit to stand lift, gait belt transfers, restraints with posey vests, vitals, NG tube med passes, NG tube feeds, etc. all of which we were evaluated on and had to pass within 3 tries to continue in the program. We also could not perform any of those skills in clinical unless we passed the evaluation.

I guess we did a lot in lab, but I can't really be sure because I don't know how other programs work in comparison.

RunBabyRN specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

As far as I know, there aren't any preceptorship programs in my area but I will definitely research more into it to make sure. I also called around today about PALS and will be taking that certification course in January. Unfortunately, there is no STABLE program in my area. =[

As for lab, we just did the usual nursing skills that I would think every nursing school does. in no particular order we did... Aseptic dressing changes with wound packing, CVAD dressing change, NG tube insertion irrigation and removal, foley/straight cath, bladder irrigation, trach care, trach suctioning, IV starts, IV skills in general like IV pushes, hanging piggy backs, spiking a bag and priming the line, drip rate calculations and setting the drip rate manually, IM and SQ injections, TPN transfusions, blood transfusions (in my area students CANNOT give blood products but we still learned anyway), PO med passes, "block" med passes; i'm not sure if this term is unique to my school, but in skills lab we did a full med pass on a patient, any PO, IM, SQ, IV meds were given because in prior evals they were always separated. one eval was just po, one was just IM/SQ, the other was just IV etc. so this was nice to learn how to put them all together, insulin mixing, hoyer lift, sit to stand lift, gait belt transfers, restraints with posey vests, vitals, NG tube med passes, NG tube feeds, etc. all of which we were evaluated on and had to pass within 3 tries to continue in the program. We also could not perform any of those skills in clinical unless we passed the evaluation.

I guess we did a lot in lab, but I can't really be sure because I don't know how other programs work in comparison.

It's always hard to compare your program to others, I know. My program had VERY little skills lab, but I ran a skills lab for another program, so I had some basis for comparison, and I've had skills lab for other medical training. If it makes you feel any better, some of the stuff you've listed we never did.

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