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New grad nurse of 3 months and might lose job because I’m struggling in my orientation. Help!

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by Scrubba Dub Scrubba Dub (New Member) New Member

157 Visitors; 11 Posts

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157 Visitors; 11 Posts

10 hours ago, DTWriter said:

OP,

New grad RN orientations (at a hospital setting) are usually 12 weeks at most (except for some specialty areas like OR).

Based on your first post -

If you only have a week left, you are better off resigning at this point and reapplying elsewhere.

As others mentioned, if you get terminated, you have to explain it when asked on future job applications.

On the other hand, if they terminate you, you may quality for unemployment checks (though, this option may not be worth it in the long run). 

Is there a particular reason why you do not want to resign from this job just yet (i.e. have children, moving expense, upcoming rent, etc.)? Spending 11 weeks seem excessive for an environment with several red flags.

So the thing is I am staying because I worked really hard just to get to the position I am at now and I want to really try to make this work before I decide to quit. The main reason why my preceptors are toxic is because I keep messing up and if I improve they leave me alone and I have actually been doing better so theyre less rude so it’s bearable and all of the pm nurses are okay with me and I actually like them. It was mostly day shift nurses that were mean. I trained for most of my orientation on day shift. But I was hired for pm shift so things are crazy but not as crazy on as days (granted, the last 3 weeks of me on pm shift orientation have been pure chaos)

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157 Visitors; 11 Posts

14 minutes ago, jtran21 said:

I work at a teaching hospital and I'm having that issue. I think it really comes down to how devoted your unit is to teaching new grads. For my case, I feel like they're implicitly comparing me to a few of the other girls whove had their practicums in the neuro icu. Stay strong sweetie!

It’s funny that my manager did not even suggest transferring me to another unit and went straight to saying she was going to terminate my employment completely. 

Edited by Scrubba Dub

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Update: Day 3 of my 5-day chunk of work is finished. I finished on time I only had 4 patients instead of 5 and discharged 1 of them before evening med pass. I am also feeling more comfortable now with knowing what to do. Only thing is, I don’t know how well I’m going to do if I get a busy day between now and Wednesday...I’ll be making updates...

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That's crazy. I would definitely look into employee services to see if they have someone who helps new grads.

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157 Visitors; 11 Posts

On 4/12/2019 at 2:33 PM, beekee said:

Offer to resign in lieu of being fired. It might not prevent you from landing on the “do not hire” list, but it’ll save you a lot of grief in future job hunting when asked if you have even been terminated. 

Best wishes. 

Would I actually be put on a “do not hire list” if I am a new grad without any experience and just was not thriving at her job? Not a rhetorical question. I’m actually asking.

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LilPeanut has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and works as a NNP.

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9 minutes ago, Scrubba Dub said:

Would I actually be put on a “do not hire list” if I am a new grad without any experience and just was not thriving at her job? Not a rhetorical question. I’m actually asking.

That depends on how petty the manager is, honestly.

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noyesno has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN.

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So sorry you're going through this. 

I've been there and its horrible. Anxiety to the max. 

They extended my orientation to 20 weeks when I was a new grad because I struggled with time management. I went on to work 8 years at the bedside, often as a charge nurse, and now I'm almost done with my FNP program. 

Doesn't sound like a very supportive work environment and, as a new grad, the need for support extends beyond the orientation period. 

My only advise: You might be better off somewhere else. This is not ideal as you just started this job. So, put in your time and then get out. Don't take their criticism too personally. It can destroy your spirit. Try to learn from it. The delivery might suck but the feedback might be good. 

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

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11 hours ago, Scrubba Dub said:

 The main reason why my preceptors are toxic is because I keep messing up and if I improve they leave me alone and I have actually been doing better so theyre less rude so it’s bearable and all of the pm nurses are okay with me and I actually like them. It was mostly day shift nurses that were mean.

If you don't like the interaction you have with your preceptors when you screw up, it's quite probable that your preceptors are not actually toxic, but that you have not learned the necessary skill of taking negative feedback well.  Your preceptors might actually be well-meaning and thoughtful preceptors who just haven't mastered the skill of giving negative feedback in a manner that makes you happy to hear it.

For all of those posters who are jumping on the preceptors for being mean or toxic:  If they are "rude" to you because you keep messing up, it is probably not mean or toxic preceptors.  It's preceptors who are understandably frustrated with an orient who keeps messing up. 

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

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11 hours ago, LilPeanut said:

That depends on how petty the manager is, honestly.

It also depends upon the magnitude, frequency and sheer number of screw-ups the OP has perpetrated as well.

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LilPeanut has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and works as a NNP.

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10 hours ago, Ruby Vee said:

It also depends upon the magnitude, frequency and sheer number of screw-ups the OP has perpetrated as well.

That wasn't her question, though.  It was "Would I actually be put on a “do not hire list” if I am a new grad without any experience and just was not thriving at her job?", which is what I was answering. 

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10 hours ago, Ruby Vee said:

If you don't like the interaction you have with your preceptors when you screw up, it's quite probable that your preceptors are not actually toxic, but that you have not learned the necessary skill of taking negative feedback well.  Your preceptors might actually be well-meaning and thoughtful preceptors who just haven't mastered the skill of giving negative feedback in a manner that makes you happy to hear it.

For all of those posters who are jumping on the preceptors for being mean or toxic:  If they are "rude" to you because you keep messing up, it is probably not mean or toxic preceptors.  It's preceptors who are understandably frustrated with an orient who keeps messing up. 

Maybe it is going both ways. Maybe the preceptor's don't have what it takes to train her and she doesn't know how to deal with it properly.  For as much as this occur's you would think, there would be  a moc training in nursing school. Angry/fustrated preceptor vs New Grad that can't handle it properly, to be held in Room 202.

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To be honest,  if you feel uncomfortable at a work setting, you have every right to speak up about it or fine a better place to work. Nobody is forced to stay somewhere they don’t like.  It’s not a matter of “if they receive criticism well, or they haven’t mastered a skill yet...bla bla bla...” obviously it’s a concern and a clear indicator that someone cares deeply when they seek advice on a forum. I don’t see the preceptor in this case, asking for help on how not to be rude, mean, power-tripping to new nurses! Rather, I see new nurses who expect a lot from themselves asking other nurses for advice and that is an indicator of strength and success! When you realize you want to improve and need help in certain areas, it only shows how much you care about your work. ;) 

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