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Negotiating my salary is exhausting!

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SCSTxRN

Specializes in Psych.

As part of my coursework in the last semester, we had to calculate what we would ask for in salary... it was average income (based on codes or RVUs) - overhead, - doctor's fee for 'supervision & training', - benefits = salary. I calculated 110-130; I was offered and accepted 115k, with full benefits.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

As part of my coursework in the last semester, we had to calculate what we would ask for in salary... it was average income (based on codes or RVUs) - overhead, - doctor's fee for 'supervision & training', - benefits = salary. I calculated 110-130; I was offered and accepted 115k, with full benefits.

What a great class! I'm surprised however because I thought Texas paid well for psychNPs and in my area savvy new grads are starting in the $150,000 range.

I also usually base my salary requirements on what they are paying psychiatrists. My thought is even if they feel they are over paying me as a NP a psychiatrist would cost them a lot more.

Designer NP, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occ med/Urgent care. Has 18 years experience.

As part of my coursework in the last semester, we had to calculate what we would ask for in salary... it was average income (based on codes or RVUs) - overhead, - doctor's fee for 'supervision & training', - benefits = salary. I calculated 110-130; I was offered and accepted 115k, with full benefits.
I think it's great your school taught you this, mine sure didn't. A class on billing, coding, and salary should be required in all NP schools. So many of us come out of school clueless on what our true value is to an employer and get screwed on salary because of it.

sadiemae1123

Has 16 years experience.

As part of my coursework in the last semester, we had to calculate what we would ask for in salary... it was average income (based on codes or RVUs) - overhead, - doctor's fee for 'supervision & training', - benefits = salary. I calculated 110-130; I was offered and accepted 115k, with full benefits.

We did something similar as well. We had to do a few case studies that revolved around what level the patient would be billed at, create a portfolio for job applications, and create a business plan for how we would market ourselves when looking for a job.

We also had a class that discussed health care policy and economics. I probably didn't pay as much attention to these things as I should but they were definitely presented and discussed.

All part of that "fluff" DNP coursework everyone seems to complain about not being clinically focused or relevant.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

We did something similar as well. We had to do a few case studies that revolved around what level the patient would be billed at, create a portfolio for job applications, and create a business plan for how we would market ourselves when looking for a job.

We also had a class that discussed health care policy and economics. I probably didn't pay as much attention to these things as I should but they were definitely presented and discussed.

All part of that "fluff" DNP coursework everyone seems to complain about not being clinically focused or relevant.

Lol we had plenty of extra time during the fluff courses we had in my MS program also to have covered some basic business acumen. The case study exercise they had you do sounds excellent.

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

Agree that before you take the job is the only opportunity to negotiate - if you accept less than you are worth, you can't really make it up later. I would also work as an NP while waiting on a reasonable NP salary offer. I do not subscribe to the theory that you are "paying dues" as a new grad and should make less than an experienced RN. You have a different, expensive skillset and knowledge as an NP and you are BILLING and bringing in income so there's no way you should earn less than a nurse who costs the institution rather than making them money.

To the poster that is 16 weeks pregnant - why does that preclude working as an RN while waiting on a decent NP offer?

bethymaester

Specializes in ER. Has 4 years experience.

Agree that before you take the job is the only opportunity to negotiate - if you accept less than you are worth, you can't really make it up later. I would also work as an NP while waiting on a reasonable NP salary offer. I do not subscribe to the theory that you are "paying dues" as a new grad and should make less than an experienced RN. You have a different, expensive skillset and knowledge as an NP and you are BILLING and bringing in income so there's no way you should earn less than a nurse who costs the institution rather than making them money.

To the poster that is 16 weeks pregnant - why does that preclude working as an RN while waiting on a decent NP offer?

Well, my problem is that I'm not already working as an RN because we had to move, and the market for NPs (or any job) is terrible in my area (low population). Also, in my state I can't get licensed, get a DEA number, etc. until I first get a job and have a collaborative physician agreement on file. So, if I went the RN route I would probably remain a "new grad" until I have the baby and start looking for work again. Here's another catch in my situation: since my husband is military we know we are going to be moving again by next summer! So . . . take a low paying NP job to get licensed and build experience since I know I have limited time? Or find an easy (likely lower paying) RN job to bring in income and just start over with my job search after we move next year?

SCSTxRN

Specializes in Psych.

Flip a coin, heads means RN, Tails means take the NP job for low pay. If what you get gives you a sick feeling in the pit of your stomach, go the other way.

Roy Hanson

Specializes in as above. Has 36 years experience.

remember the average wage percentage these day is 2%. The fringe benefits is where the action is. Wage increase only puts you into a higher tax bracket. Now read my lips.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

remember the average wage percentage these day is 2%. The fringe benefits is where the action is. Wage increase only puts you into a higher tax bracket. Now read my lips.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean. The fringe benefits are worth some consideration but I'm all about the salary. I know two NPs with many years of experience working for the VA and while their benefits are excellent, my salary is $50,000 a year higher and my benefits are decent, so imo there are no fringe benefits worth that much of a lower salary.

Roy Hanson

Specializes in as above. Has 36 years experience.

understood..you are about MONEY! Consider the higher tax bracket as previous email. We used to negotiate Fringe Benefit packages..its tax free. Look at the deductable you MAY need to pay for drugs/vision, etc. You have to think outside your wallet. OR work to rule..

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

understood..you are about MONEY! Consider the higher tax bracket as previous email. We used to negotiate Fringe Benefit packages..its tax free. Look at the deductable you MAY need to pay for drugs/vision, etc. You have to think outside your wallet. OR work to rule..

Uhh ok so I get there is value in benefits and good point about the tax free advantages but I still don't think there is any benefit package so good that it will substitute for an excellent wage.

sadiemae1123

Has 16 years experience.

I think the above two comments showcase why it is so important to negotiate, not only when applying for a job, but at regular intervals. An employer isn't going to know if the person their offering a job to prefers a larger take home salary with decent benefits versus someone who prefers an better benefits package with a more "middle of the Bell Curve" salary.

You have to work these things out when you get hired and then revisit the issue as life and circumstances change.

Roy Hanson

Specializes in as above. Has 36 years experience.

Negotiation are fun! But keep an eye,,uhh huh, on your taxes. Its nice to have lots of money coming in, hon, but what that tax bracket you are in. I have been on a negotiating time in the past. And if you get a pay raise, look at your taxes increase. Negotiate on a year basis. Do your homework. Rely not other others.

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