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need help re reading glasses

Nurses   (5,913 Views 17 Comments)
by mjm1979 mjm1979 (Member)

mjm1979 specializes in Geriatrics.

2,579 Profile Views; 72 Posts

I'd like some advice on how to work reading glasses into practicing medicine... I have to wear them when pulling meds and when filling out all my paperwork (Assessment/med sheets etc.) I'm finishing up my first quarter of schooling and have tons of paperwork to fill out while I'm at my clinical site and then to pull meds I also need to wear my glasses to read the MAR and the drug boxes... I'm constantly pulling off/putting on my glasses... Laying them here, laying them there... it's a pain. Even tho they're a low strength, they still make me dizzy if I wear them up all the time... If I wear them down on my nose all the time they just make my sweating issue (nursing home) worse... My clinical instructor got on me last week and said I need to wear them on a chain around my neck... how does this work with putting on/pulling off stethoscope around the neck... I don't want to break the glasses or get them tangled all the time.... Any advice??? Thanks!!

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loricatus specializes in ED, ICU, PACU.

1,446 Posts; 13,033 Profile Views

I have to remove my glasses for the very things you need to put them on for (need them for distance but can't even read my watch with them on). The thing around my neck didn't work-besides the stethoscope getting tangled in it, it would become an infection control issue as I worked over a patient's bed. The simple thing that has worked for me, so far, is to put them on top of my head (like the way sunglasses go when indooors). The only problem I have is that the nose pads ocassionally pull hair when I remove the glasses too fast-which could be resolved if go and get another pair of glasses with different nose pads.

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EmilyUSFRN is a RN and specializes in Pediatrics.

69 Posts; 2,493 Profile Views

you could go to an optometrist office and see if they can make you some progressive (no line bifocal) lenses-- you can have your "distance" power at no correction if that's what you need, then the bottom has your reading strength. doing that makes it so that you really don't have to keep taking them on and off, and if you find some otc frames you like, they can usually be used.

you could also try to find some frames that don't have nosepads (plastic frames that just sit on the nose) so that if you push them on top of your head, your hair isn't pulled, but will probably over time have to get them adjusted (most places will do it for free) since it tends to stretch out the arms of the frame.

talk with your eye doctor and just go over some options available to you... we all gotta see!

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97 Posts; 2,480 Profile Views

I agree with going to an optometrist for progressive glasses and especially for an eye exam, if you haven't had one lately. I went for years with reading glasses only to find that my distant vision wasn't as good as I thought it was (quite clear to me but had depth perception problems). Like most, I adapted and "tricked" my brain into thinking I was fine with distant vision.

Ended up getting progressive no-line lightweight bifocals. They take a day or two to get used to (first feel awkward and uncomfortable, but you soon adjust) but now I leave them on for 12 hrs straight and don't even think about them.

Best of luck

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meownsmile is a BSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

2,532 Posts; 10,311 Profile Views

I agree, bifocals, I know its hard to make yourself fess up to the fact its time, but when you have to have them to do the tasks you are talking about its just easier all the way around to get used to wearing glasses and getting over it. It took me a while to get used to having glasses. Ive never needed glasses before but alass i had to succumb to the fact i wasnt going to be able to put it off any longer.

I still have to take them off when i go into isolation, but i just lay them on top of the cart in the hallway and pick them back up when i come out.

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6,487 Posts; 21,377 Profile Views

If you only need them for reading but your distance is fine, get half-glasses. They can stay on your face and you can look up over them if you need to, then take them off when no reading is needed for a while. The other option is to get full-frame but have the optician make the lenses like bifocals: the prescription is on the bottom portion of the lenses and the surrounding lens is just plastic.

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JudithL_in_NH specializes in School, Camp, Hospice, Critical Care.

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My vision sounds just like yours.

I wear "granny glasses" (half glasses)--I don't keep 'em on all the time--when I'm not doing close work, I hook 'em into my neckline. I never put them down--as I would never find them again.

Several of the nurses I work with have similar vision--some wear those decorative pins on their lapels with a loop on them for the glasses--I find just sticking one stem of the glasses into my neckline works just as well.

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bill4745 is a RN and specializes in ICU, ER.

874 Posts; 9,098 Profile Views

I have progressive lenses and love them. I wear them every minute I am awake. The in-between area is great for computer work.

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93 Posts; 2,234 Profile Views

I tried the progressive glasses (which were better than regular reading glasses) but I still had difficulty. Went to monovision contacts which work for me. Good luck..........better old than cold my Uncle Ralph used to say :)

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TriggerRN specializes in ER/ICU/MedSurg/Supervision.

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I was having problems with my glasses also. I was wearing bifocals, but had to take them off to read, chart, start IV's, anything that was close up. I tried a lot in the way of glasses and contacts. Finally went and had Lasik. It was the best investment I ever made. Some places (I had mine done in Nashville), work with you for a payment plan. Mine was 18 months same as cash. And when I went for my year's check up they were offering 24 months same as cash. In the long run, it really was a good investment and it solved the problem.

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93 Posts; 2,234 Profile Views

Can you have Lasik for just reading or do you have to have distance impairment as well?

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EmilyUSFRN is a RN and specializes in Pediatrics.

69 Posts; 2,493 Profile Views

you can have LASIK done with monovision as mentioned earlier... one eye is reading and one is for distance and your brain puts the two together. however, you may still need some reading glasses or some plain lenses with anti-glare on them for situations like night driving. make an appointment with your optometrist to see if you would be a good candidate for LASIK, even if you aren't, then you will have a nice new rx to help you see better.

i worked for an optometrist group for the past 3 years going through NS, and they really do get a lot of people asking, coming in to see if it would be good for them, and they can refer you to places that do exceptional work-- essentially with LASIK, you get what you pay for, unfortunately.

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