OHHHHHHH, my aching back

  1. Well, I think today put me over the edge.

    Incident 1 - told at 13:45, cat scan is waiting for you and you were supposed to have your patient there at 13:30. First I heard about it. ROAD TRIP....have to transport the patient all by myself, bed, 4 channel pump plus all IV lines, portable monitor - luckily he wasn't vented, just on a face mask at 50%. All by myself with at least a 1,000 lb bed.

    Incident 2 - Your specialty mattress is here for your other pt. Pt weight = 306 lb. Help=All other ICU nurses on unit. 3 of them, all women, all small women. My L5 is screaming.

    Suvey question=Who helps you at your facility? Do you have transport? Do you have lift teams? Do you have lifts?

    Is this reasonable and the norm out there is ICU land? BTW, about 40% of the nurses on my unit have old, (from working in this unit), back injuries!

    All advice and opinions welcome.

    Signed,
    Oh, I am SO glad I am off tomorrow!
  2. Visit Hoozdo profile page

    About Hoozdo

    Joined: Nov '04; Posts: 1,590; Likes: 700

    9 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    The no lift policy is alive and well in central IL! Write up a proposal to the suit folks. The no lift policy prevents injuries and lost work days.


    BTW - I couldn't help but notice your countdown - 7 years with your new liver??!!! How wonderful!

    I used to work with a kidney transplant recipient RN in the ER. She was an inspiration.
  4. by   manna
    I work in a SMALL hospital - 6 bed ICU. I work night shift - when we have to do lifting, we ask the nurses/techs from other floors to help (if and when they're not busy - ha!). Day shift has "transporters" that wheel patients around in beds/wheelchairs and of course, PT and PTA's that help get patients up into chairs, etc.
  5. by   manna
    Just to add - I've been doing alot of visiting the chiropractor since I started working as an RN in May! LOL
  6. by   MistyDawnRN06
    We have lift teams. All you have to do is page and 2 burly guys will show up to help lift patients (trained in body mechanics by our hospital). Our clerks help with all transports. Also staff helps each other out. We have a charge nurse and a resource nurse out of staff to help with road trips, lifts, etc. It's a pretty sweet set-up!
  7. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from traumaRUs
    BTW - I couldn't help but notice your countdown - 7 years with your new liver??!!! How wonderful!

    I used to work with a kidney transplant recipient RN in the ER. She was an inspiration.
    Thanks! My transplant is what hooked me to become a nurse as a second career. I love nursing - the ICU in particular! It is great to be alive
    It is a very powerful feeling to transform from an ICU patient to an ICU nurse!
  8. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from MistyDawnRN06
    We have lift teams. All you have to do is page and 2 burly guys will show up to help lift patients (trained in body mechanics by our hospital). Our clerks help with all transports. Also staff helps each other out. We have a charge nurse and a resource nurse out of staff to help with road trips, lifts, etc. It's a pretty sweet set-up!
    Sweet, sweet, sweet! Last night I had to put a 350 lb'er onto a cooling blanket. NOT SWEET :trout:
  9. by   Pompom
    We help each other. There is no way I could push the bed plus IV pumps by myself, our beds are old and don't steer well. My back means too much to me, especially after having 1 surgery. If CT doesn't like it too bad, let them come help transport the patient.
  10. by   muffie
    we have porters, orderlies, lift machines, lift aids and a no lift policy
    i guess i am fortunate
  11. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from Pompom
    If CT doesn't like it too bad, let them come help transport the patient.
    Yep. I've told CT that I don't have the help so they need to come over and help me transport.

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