In nursing school clinical did you experience discrimination / bias from instructor? - page 3

Hey guys, So I am an older male nursing student and I just failed a clinical course in pediatrics. Prior to this course I had great grades and very good clinical evaluations. Because this was a... Read More

  1. by   red2003xlt
    Have gone thru something similar; heres what me and a fellow male student did.

    We gather are paperwork and good reviews, etc

    Then a filed gender discrimination complaint with the schools office of civil rights.


    Long story short we were exonerated and the instructor censored and denied tenure
  2. by   baldee
    "
    what finally made them stand up and take notice was when i found out who their accreditation agency was and found out how to file a complaint with them. the nursing department paid attention then and started kissing everyone's a**. until then the nursing department pretty much had contempt for all agencies b/c they knew the university would cover them. "

    dude, or dudette, inquiring minds want to know!
  3. by   umbdude
    I don't understand this. Male nursing students don't have a choice to opt out of OB/Peds, and many of them probably will never go into those specialties anyway, so why do the instructors and nurses feel so threatened? I understand that the presense of a male nurse might cause some issues in L&D but they should find ways to deal with this instead of harbouring discrimination.

    Don't PAs and student docs have to go through this as well? Maybe it comes down to the fact that people don't feel comfortable associating males to nursing?
  4. by   baldee
    That is always a probability, but for the most part unsubstantiated. My experience is women generally do not mind men nurses unless they are real old and/or brainwashed. Jealous husbands are a main source of problem in OB. Generalizing a biased specialy to nursing in whole is a far-fetched rationalization borderlining on delusional (if no meds or medical injuries are involved).

    My patient feedback is near 100% excellent, but the Clinical Instructor's (CI's) subjective ratings are borderline at best - well, after drop date anyway. My observations of RN sexes on the floors are the reverse of your assumptions as well: maybe due to a higher standard for the guys vs the gals. There are never any objective ratings from the CI by significant evidence or trends, but rather "I feel" comments. If a guy sees a vag delivery, it will be without the husband there most likely. And most likely it will be an empowered woman giving birth to a lucky holistically healthy child.

    Dr. MLK Jr. said it best, "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."


    Peace!





    Quote from umbdude
    I don't understand this. Male nursing students don't have a choice to opt out of OB/Peds, and many of them probably will never go into those specialties anyway, so why do the instructors and nurses feel so threatened? I understand that the presense of a male nurse might cause some issues in L&D but they should find ways to deal with this instead of harbouring discrimination.

    Don't PAs and student docs have to go through this as well? Maybe it comes down to the fact that people don't feel comfortable associating males to nursing?
  5. by   arbor-vitae
    Excellent advise!!!! Thank you
  6. by   arbor-vitae
    Quote from andrew19xx
    currently my program's teachers, and maybe even the director, are trying to get rid of me... one teacher whom i had a disagreement with a while back, (who it turns out is a bit of a sociopath,) has since been spreading rumors and propaganda behind my back to try and turn the other teachers and a lot of students against me, and has has been pretty successful at it. all of it is lies and slander. but as you said, they are masters of documentation, and they've been using it to their advantage for a while now. gathering lots of ammo to shoot me down with, without my knowing.
    i experienced the exact situation where i went to school. you mention some keywords; "sociopath", loading up on ammo, and ostersized by other students. it has become clear to me that we are amongst sociopaths everywhere and we don't even know it. huge disadvantage for us! while we are constrained by our morals, values and conscious, they (sociopaths) are aware of this and exploit it. my former nursing director, in my opinion, is a sociopath, and like you, she gathered ammo without me knowing it. she had a network of moles(students who would do anything to stay in her good graces) feed her information about other students. lies and slanders is an understatement. professors which i previously had a good rapport with before, i could easily sense they were now against me. by the time i knew i was under attack, it was too late. they could not get me in lecture as i was pulling a's, and you either know the test material or you don't. you determine and have control of your lecture grades. clinical is a different story; they can say and do anything, in the end it is their opinion, lies or not. it was all propaganda and lies. i left that school and am now doing fine in a legitimate nursing school. it was an awful experience but a great lesson learned. this career field is full of cutthroat, sociopathic people. btw; that director has now been sacked and no longer is part of the program. the school finally figured out she was costing them thousands of dollars because of her wicked ways. i am sure this rotten person has a history behind her, people laying in her wake of sociopathic behavior, hospital to nursing school.
    .
    Last edit by arbor-vitae on May 19, '12 : Reason: errors
  7. by   trry699
    Sometimes things in life are not fair. Yes, once in awhile you may come across a biased instructor. But, for the most part they are very professional and helpful. I did have one who had a problem with men. At first I thought it was just me being paranoid. So I began asking male students from previous class years and surprise. They all pointed out this one instructor gave them an unusually difficult time. Not much you can do about it. Just try and hang in there and persevere. You could go to the top to complain, but they probably won't believe you. I did not take that route, but I did find ways to avoid her when I could. It is possible to get sick when its your turn to face her in clinicals which is where she will get you. That is the only advice I can give. If you want it bad enough you will make it no matter what. Good luck. I believe this situation to be extremely rare. This instructor however is still teaching.
  8. by   baldee
    They are more than you think. The one thing you can do is assist in taking their license away, throught the proper channels for the sake of the Nursing Profession. They can't work as nurses, they can only do harm as nursing professors, and they will never correct their tragic life-scripts until after they hit bottom: a lose-lose-lose chained scenario that must be 'nipped' by those who have the knowledge and courage. God save the Nursing Profession!
  9. by   PennyWise
    At first I was going to jump right in and say "yes, there was one particular instructor who hated me." Now that I think about it though, her problem with me had more to do with the fact that she felt I had an unfair advantage. I was doing clinicals on the same unit I worked as an aid and the nurses who knew me all wanted to help me out. My instructor didn't appreciate that.

    And I guess that is the sum of it all right there. At first, I wanted to say I was discriminated against, but when I really reflect on it, I know I wasn't.

    At my school, the there was a rumor that the director did not like men. Im glad I did not give this gossip any credit. I liked her very much and got no hint of w/e it was that made people say this about her.

    We all float down here.
  10. by   vctor12
    I had the same problem I had to change clinical instructors because because I overheard her saying that she always drop at lest 2 women and 1 guy, I was the man there and I was not about to be droped, I went to the director of the program and was trasfered to another clinical group.
  11. by   docomo
    I recently graduated myself, and as a male, I can tell you that I hated nursing school with all my heart.  We have a policy in our school that says any exam question can be challenged.  Throughout the entire program, I never received credit for a single exam question that I challenged.  Some of the female students would get credit for 2 or 3 questions per exam.  <br><br>There were countless times that I felt discriminated, but I never said a word.  Personally, I think the entire nursing profession suffers the same illness that all professions which are dominated by a single sex suffer from.  I don't know what the name of that disease is, but the phrase "nurses eat their young" pretty much describes it all.  I'm a new grad and everyday I wonder how I'll manage to get by when I have to deal with other nurses who have hateful attitudes.  I see it so often, even in this forum.  So many who think that the are so wise, when in fact, all they are is hateful and full of spite and prejudices.
  12. by   Revvy1337
    When I was going through the OB/PEDs clinicals, I had a lot of downtime since many women were uncomfortable with male nurses. However, I stayed attentive and helped out where I could so my instructor said I passed with flying colors. For example, the female students helped the mothers, and I did all the baby checkups/vaccines. I feel bad for you men that had rough times there are still pockets of resistance as I call it in the nursing field. Afterall, they trust male doctors but not male nurses in the OB world.
  13. by   docomo
    Quote from Revvy1337
    When I was going through the OB/PEDs clinicals, I had a lot of downtime since many women were uncomfortable with male nurses. However, I stayed attentive and helped out where I could so my instructor said I passed with flying colors. For example, the female students helped the mothers, and I did all the baby checkups/vaccines. I feel bad for you men that had rough times there are still pockets of resistance as I call it in the nursing field. Afterall, they trust male doctors but not male nurses in the OB world.
    You couldn't have said it better. OB was hell for me. The patients were fine with male students, but the nurses despised having male students. For the most part, I think it's also worth acknowledging that you are correct when you say "pockets of resistance". Most nurses are intelligent people who realize that gender doesn't matter, and no one should let a few bad apples deter them from enjoying their chosen profession. Also, they are not entirely unjustified. Just before graduation, during my preceptorship I witnessed a male nurse covertly peeking up the gown of young woman that had just come back from surgery. Inside I felt angry and betrayed at having seen this. I thought that it's because of perverts like this guy that I so often have a hard time in this line of work. But then I thought of female teachers who sleep with their underage students and decided that it's not something that is unique to men. Perhaps more common, because of the roles males and females have in society, but not unique.
    Last edit by docomo on Jun 25, '12

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