Latest Comments by tmartin83

tmartin83, BSN 3,780 Views

Joined: Apr 14, '11; Posts: 106 (21% Liked) ; Likes: 34
RN; from US
Specialty: 5 year(s) of experience in Medical/Surgical, Ambulatory Care

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    tokmom likes this.

    I took the exam (through AMSN) a while back, and I can definitely say with confidence that their exam is Level 10 in comparison with NCLEX. It was a bit harder IMO. I believe using floor experience would be more valuable. Good luck!

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    tokmom likes this.

    I feel as if it means "acute-care", as most of the questions on the exam are specific to that area.

    So to simplify, hospital. :-)

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    Answering your last question, yes. It was one of the biggest changes I've made as far as rearranging my time management skills. I also worked 3-11, and usually with that shift your 1700 and 2100 medpass are your biggest. Well, with 7-3, you have to get your assessments done by your 0900 meds, and make time for the MDs/residents who like to come in anytime between 0700-1100... Oh, and if you get d/c orders before then, then you gotta factor that in as well.

    Not trying to scare you; just want to have you prepared for what to expect; because I kinda had to just jump into it. My best advice is to know your pt. as much as possible, as early as possible. Know what tests have to be done that morning; see if they were prepped prior to change of shift (if needed). Get the bulk of your assessments into the computer early, so that you can spread yourself better throughout the shift. You'll be busy, but your shift will be over in the blink of an eye.

    Good luck :-)!

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    lulusmom likes this.

    This recently happened to me (choice between med-surg and endoscopy), and I had to go with the med-surg position. I'm sure some folks would say that I was crazy for that, but given the fact that I've been a med-surg nurse my entire career (only 3 years), and got certified last year, I can truly say that med-surg has grown on me. It's definitely a love-hate relationship, but as the pp said, it'a all about time management. You have your slow days, and you definitely have your fast-paced days. With both paths, you'll be able to venture into other fields easily, but I have noticed that some employers like nurses from corrections. Just my observations, but you'll be fine with either path you choose. Good luck!

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    Hi! Will be moving to the area soon and was wondering if anyone else has recently applied to University Hospital in Augusta, GA. Just wanted to get a time frame of how soon to apply if it takes them a while to get back to the applicants. Did they get back to you pretty quick after you applied?

    Thank you.

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    Quote from ladybella1
    I am considering relocation to the Sierra Vista area. Could anyone tell me about job availability for LPNs? I'm presently located in the Southeast. Any input would be appreciated.
    There are, unfortunately, not many opportunities for LPNs in the acute-care care facility in Sierra Vista (Especially at SVRHC). You may be able to find jobs at Kindred or the LTC facilities around. Would you consider going back to school for your RN? I'm currently in the area, so if you have any questions, let me know.

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    Thanks BlueChocolateCat :-)

    It was painfully obvious, unfortunately. Being on the floor, seeing and hearing nurses bad-mouth the floor, severe staffing issues (on my third day of orientation, THIRD DAY, I was actually pulled to be a CNA with 13 pts on a different floor from where I was orienting, and had no idea where things were, was locked out of their supply/linen room), oh I could go on and on, hahhahah!

    Having said that, do you think it was a good idea to resign? I just totally felt as if my orientation time was pooped on and there was no lack of concern for it. I mean... it was the worst feeling ever having to constantly ask another nurse I've never met to open the door to the supply room and just overall relying on everyone to do things because I didn't have the access/capabilities to do so.

    I was totally prepared to burn that bridge, unfortunately. I just never expected to get asked to come back and give it another try. They actually want me to continue orientation tomorrow, so Im prepared to give it another chance. Perhaps this is some test??? Oh yeah, I'm definitely not gonna bring this up at my interview... I'm just hoping and praying they don't ask about it at all...

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    Hi All;

    Just wanted to get some insight. I recently sent a resignation letter to my supervisor of my fairly new job (I was only a week into orientation before I decided to quit). I ended up leaving for a large number of reasons, which mainly encompassed "half-a**ed" patient care, compromise of safety, and just an overall negative work environment.

    I checked my email about a few hours after sending the resignation notice, and I got a response from my manager, basically asking me to stay and give them a chance to work it out and offer any suggestions to make it better (believe me, it's a whooooole lot that needs to be done here). What would you all do? Would you give it a second chance, or just leave?

    I also have two interviews set up at a more established facilities (which is Magnet), but the only issue is that they are about an hour away from home. The job mentioned above is only 2 miles from my home. Would you go to a better facility that's further out, or try to work it out at a hospital that's close, but has major issues? Any help is appreciated. Thanks!

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    Guess that's a question to ask first... Which one are you going for? CMSRN or RN-BC?

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    Use the materials that AMSN offer for this exam, since the test comes from them. The 275? book is very helpful.

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    This makes me thank sweet baby Jesus that I dont have crappy MDs or residents like this.... Id leave quick, fast, and in a hurry! As first poster stated, you are your patient's advocate, not the doc's butt kisser.

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    808dreams likes this.

    Hi;

    Im not 100% sure about Kona, but here in Oahu it's highly suggested that you are here and have a physical address before even considering applying (I'm military, so I applied to hospitals here when we were in OK, and never got a call back, lol). The market is so saturated here on the island, but with the new hospital opening up (Queens), I'm assuming that will help, but not much. The nursing programs here, IMHO, are pumping out more new grad RNs than the island needs. I have noticed that a lot of folks from where I work applied there; however, only 1 person even got an offer. It's extremely competitive... I believe on the last job fair some 3k people showed up for only 300 job postings/openings... Good luck!

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    I really think it varies on the state you're in. When I was in Virginia, it took 2 weeks for me to get my ATT to register to sit for NCLEX. I've heard of people getting their ATTs weeks after, and even 1-2 months. Did you just graduate? Has your degree been conferred?

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    meesarjarjar likes this.

    Residency is not required in order to obtain a license in the state of HI (I know this from experience). I actually graduated from school in VA, but sat for NCLEX in OK. You can sit for NCLEX anywhere in the US. I hope that makes sense :-) Good Luck.


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