Latest Comments by Juryizout

Juryizout, LPN 6,683 Views

Joined: Apr 13, '10; Posts: 145 (24% Liked) ; Likes: 92

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  • 0

    I was on 8's when I first started out. We also work every other weekend, so the only time I got 2 days off in a row was my weekend off. Now working 3 12's with the same every other weekend off. Being older does make a difference. I feel like all I do is work, eat, sleep, repeat on those days. Something about knowing I will be home before 8 pm really appeals to me. Maybe someday.....

  • 2

    Hi,

    I've been in psych since I graduated, and have always had a heart for anyone struggling with psych issues. There is a book another poster referred me to called, "Verbal Judo". I picked it up on Kindle and it's a great read for the types of situations you will find yourself in. The hardest part is to not take what they say personally. Just last week, a challenging patient asked me if they paid me. I said yes, she said it did not appear so since I looked so bad and needed a haircut. other times, I get hurled insults at just because I deny their request for certain meds, or can't do what they ask at the time I'm available. Some days I just come home and de-stress by not saying anything about my day. I work Geripsych which means lots of co-morbidities, such as heart, liver, cancer, etc. We are somewhat like a nursing home as we have to change people, and convince them to bathe, take meds, eat meals, and go to groups.
    The turnover is great due to people accepting the job not knowing what to expect, and then finding out its not for them. Then there's the safety issue, especially in acute. I worked on a woman's acute unit first, and had my share of physical situations. Our facility does training for this.
    Just know that psych is a true calling. You either love it, or hate it, but you'll know fairly soon which it is.

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    I can't really add much to what the previous poster said because it was so awesome! But I did go through that. Boundaries are what saved me from taking it so personally. As bad as I hated that it happened, I know in my heart we did all we could, and essentially, the rest was up to them. They had to do the work of therapy and be compliant with medication without us.

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    I'm usually always tired. Lots of times we are short, so it's just me and another nurse. I do meds/treatments and help the aides while she does the RN stuff I can't legally help her with. I'm not ever bored in Geri-psych; there is always someone to help change, meal to serve, or a group to help with. And you do have comorbidities to deal with. Lots of times that's the challenge: they can't understand you are trying to help them by drawing labs, putting them on a fluid restriction, or helping them get rid of lice. The mental illness compounds everything.

  • 0

    I found my wound care CE's came in handy with my patients who injure themselves, and have horribly controlled diabetes with foot ulcers.

  • 0

    I'm finding that facilities are more focused on days without seclusions/restraints and will chastise the staff member who makes the call to use either of those. It "messes up the numbers", regardless if staff have been injured or not.

  • 0

    We have security, but they don't come to codes. They are for intake only. I have used some of my male nurse's presence to deter patients going off, and some aides.

  • 1
    audreysmagic likes this.

    I got attacked a few months ago and ended up in the ER. I was fortunate to have my manager advocate for me as I was having a hard time being on the floor around that patient following the incident. It was one of those attacks that you don't see coming, that patient was not agitated or irritated in any way. I know how you feel. What about staff safety? I wish their was more that they would do to protect us.
    Take care of yourself!

  • 1
    Orca likes this.

    Yeah, you need to run like heck.... nobody is worth you throwing away that license for...NOBODY!

  • 1
    Orca likes this.

    Hi,
    I've been the LPN at a psych facility for 4 years. The pp is correct about compliance. The more they get to know you, the more they will attempt to trust. I say attempt because sometimes they try trusting and decide it's too difficult. Don't take it personally. I get "fired" everyday I work from some patient. In trying to get to know them I start regionally and ask where they are from. I comment on how nice they look that day, ask them if they are ready for (whichever meal is next), and do they need anything. And now you will get most of your pharmacology class: by looking up their meds. I look a new one up at least twice a week that I've never heard of.
    The last thing I'll say is don't let them rush you while you prepare their medication. They will push, don't let them get to you.

  • 1
    berdawn likes this.

    Just letting you know: for remittance, they required I take the final from the previous semester of med-surg, that I passed. I studied a lot and made an 84. Now awaiting the required check off that will be in August.
    Thanks a lot for your advice. I appreciate it!

  • 0

    I did withdraw, and now am seeking readmittance. I have to retake the final from Med Surg I (that I passed) to make sure I retained enough to retake Med Surg II. I also will have to do check offs.
    You're probably right...I most likely answered questions in practice than right out of the book. In LPN school, I didn't have this problem. Sounds like a plan to be a "know-nothing nursing student" and just learn from the teacher/books/lectures.

    Thanks for your help!

  • 0

    I'm talking about me, by the way. Here's the short version: LPN who went back to a small community college after finishing micro last fall. Mental Health nursing...check, Med surg I...check, OB... check, then I get to Med surg II. Our semester's are strange because we do two classes (sometimes 3 with pharm) first 5 weeks-we cram a semester's work of work into, Like psych nursing or OB then to med surg for the additional 11 weeks.

    I work full-time, 3-12's, every Fri, Sat, Sun., go to school, lab, clinicals, and lecture, Mon-Thurs. Most of my class works in the health field and alot of them get to study after their work is done. I guess that's how they get the edge. Anyway, we are having a "television class" from another campus with teachers we aren't familiar with. So far, I've managed to bomb 3 tests, 70, 72, 73 with one more and the final to go. I did the formula: your average multiplied by 0.5, subtracted from 78.5 (our passing grade). My calculations put me at having to get an 84 on the next text and final. If I can't make at least a 78.5, how am I going to make an 84? I've rewritten notes, studied for hours, online flashcards, paper flashcards. I have a bit of a drive: 50 minutes one way, so I record the lectures and play them on the way and back. I study with student's, husband. Other nurses where I work.

    I have until the first of December to drop with a W and that's after the last test. Thoughts?
    Thanks!

  • 2

    I work with mostly older people, 60 is a young person on our unit. Sometimes we get younger patients because our unit is the calmest in the hospital.

    I love geriatrics! They are so cool!

  • 0

    Well said! Thank you!


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