Latest Comments by jbudrick

jbudrick, MSN Pro 3,318 Views

Joined: Aug 18, '08; Posts: 74 (61% Liked) ; Likes: 113
Nurse Practice Educator; from CT , US
Specialty: 15 year(s) of experience in Certified Nurse Educator

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  • 0

    I completed the WOCN Emory program in January. Bridge week was in February. Emory provided study materials specifically to study for the certification exam. Bridge week helped me prepare for the exam also. I strongly recommend the Emory program. I followed the instructions and passed all three exams on the first try. I took one exam per week, just as Emory recommended. Good luck in your journey to certification. Have a good day.

    Jbudrick, CWOCN

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    sallyrnrrt likes this.

    Another option is Montgomery straps. If you really need to change the dressing three times daily, this is low cost way to to keep the dressing in place and reduce skin damage. Best wishes.

    Diana

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    Have you asked your school for guidance? I completed an MSN Education in 2014. I completed a practicum with a faculty member teaching an online course. I asked the school about local facilities where they already had contracts to precept students and found a preceptor that way for the professional development practicum. Best wishes in your pursuit of an MSN.

    Diana

  • 3
    brownbook, Nurse Leigh, and roser13 like this.

    Hello Big Mike:

    One thing to consider before signing up for an $80,000 nursing program: How are your grades? Nursing courses are usually much more difficult than the prerequisite courses. If your grades are holding you back from being accepted at a less expensive college, you might want to reconsider nursing altogether. I think most nurses would agree that being accepted into a program is the easiest part of getting a nursing degree. In any event, best of luck in your pursuit of an RN.

    Diana

  • 5
    Marshall1, Avid reader, RehabRN5, and 2 others like this.

    Please keep in mind that the depression may follow you into the next job. It sounds like you are having a hard time building a life in your new town. Definitely discuss the depression with your doctor. Also, follow the basic nursing advice of eat right, get plenty of exercise and rest. Spend time outside of work socializing with other people, like take a class or participate in a sport. Hope things look up for your soon.

    Diana

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    herring_RN and sirI like this.

    Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT

  • 2

    Quote from RN-BSN2011
    Hi Jbudrick MSN,

    How was your experience with the programa and content at SHU? Did they assign you a mentor as a graduare student nurse educator? I am researching 32 other school ( SUNY empire state school of nursing and Chamberlain). Thanks in advance!
    My experience at SHU was excellent. There were many papers assigned and weekly discussion boards, as well as group projects. For the professional development clinical practicum, I had to make efforts to find my own preceptor and SHU provided some guidance. I was fortunate that the first person I spoke to at a hospital SHU had a contract with agreed to precept me. It went very well and was a terrific learning experience. It was easier on the academic side. I wanted to learn about on-line teaching and I was assigned as a teaching assistant for two different nursing classes. I had the same academic advisor throughout the program, who also was my professor for the capstone courses. I live near campus so I was able to meet some of the professors in person as well as one of the professors for whom I was a teaching assistant. As I was interviewing for jobs, I also met other SHU graduates. Overall, my experience with SHU was very positive.

  • 1
    Nurse Beth likes this.

    Dear Burned Out and Bummed Out,

    One more thing, you do not have to remain a nurse if it doesn't feel right. You can go back to college for another career, or see what other jobs you can get with your nursing degree. Just a thought ....

    JBudrick

  • 4

    Dear Burned Out and Bummed Out,
    One of the things they don’t teach in nursing school is that after you graduate you get a “job” that has all the requirements and disadvantages of any job. You are expected to show up to work, do your job to a high standard, get along with people obnoxious or not, navigate through politics, etc. After all of the learning about how to be professional sometimes you get treated like you work at a fast food joint. All “jobs” have some elements in common. The difference is that in nursing you sometimes have the opportunity to truly help people. Nurses usually make a decent salary with benefits, and can advance their career. At times you help people just by doing the job you were hired to do. Other times, you simply cannot help those who won’t accept your help. People have the right to make bad decisions. What makes it all worthwhile is when there is a patient that you can truly help manage their illness and live the best life they can. The chance to truly help someone isn’t an everyday event. Even in home care, most patients won’t change their lifestyle even if it is killing them. In psychiatric nursing home care I would see the same patients for years and help them remain in the community as long as I could until another exacerbation landed them in the hospital.
    Best wishes in your search for meaningful career.
    JBudrick

  • 2
    vintagemother and LeChien like this.

    In Connecticut, not providing pain medication in an immediate manner is considered a deficiency. Requests for pain relief cannot be ignored. Just saying .... You can anticipate that some patients will request pain medication at the first available time. In any event, you will get quicker over time. Also keep in mind that even though you have the one hour before and after, some meds must be given promptly such as seizure medications and insulin. Best wishes on your new job.

  • 1
    NRSKarenRN likes this.

    I wanted to let you all know I graduated from SHU in Dec. 2014 with an MSN Education. I have a job in professional development because of my degree. It took 18 months with one class every eight weeks. I worked full-time for most of the program. Good luck everyone.

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    Amy'sGrandbaby and SRDAVIS like this.

    I passed the CNE yesterday. To study I used Certified Nursing Exam Questions on my Kindle from Amazon, and a textbook from my MSN in Education classes, Billings and Halstead, Teaching in Nursing. It was a very hard exam. The questions were mainly application of concepts to situations. My experience as an LPN Instructor was the most helpful for passing the test. Good luck with the exam.

  • 2
    kiszi and icuRNmaggie like this.

    A skunk got my dog and I. It was awful. Called the vet at 8 am. Went to the grocery store as soon as I found out I needed vinegar.

  • 0

    My understanding is that now reimbursement is tied to outcomes. If the patient is re-hospitalized for the same condition, the hospital doesn't get paid. If the Medicare home care patient does not have good outcomes, they do not receive full payment for services. The difference between the problem of providing care to noncompliant patients, is that now providers will not receive payment unless the patient has a good outcome.

  • 1
    herring_RN likes this.

    An aspect of the ACA that I find interesting is outcomes and the noncompliant patient. We have all seen patients who are their own worst enemy. The lady with COPD and O2 who smokes two packs of cigarettes daily, and is hospitalized four times yearly with Pnuemonia and COPD exacerbations, numerous bouts of abx therapy for respiratory problems. She just keeps getting sicker. There will not be a good outcome. How will doctors, home care providers, and hospitals manage these patients? Will doctors "fire" the noncompliant patient? The ACA has opened up some interesting ethical and philosophical dilemmas.


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