Man Considering Career Change To Nursing - Questions

Nurses Men

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OK so here's my question. I am a 33 year old guy and married to an exceptional RN. I am currently a real estate agent, and have spent three years struggling to get by on what is basically one income, thanks to the real estate market. I have made the decision to leave the real estate field, and am seriously considering a move into the nursing field. The hospital/school where my wife got her diploma offers a FULL RIDE scholarship to family members - books and all - so I am seriously considering this as an option. Here is my issue however...

I tend to be a squeamish person, and am a little apprehensive about this. I understand that I could go into an area of nursing that was a little less "gross", like psych (which actually interests me more than any area), but am still concerned about dealing with the squeamish-inducing stuff during school.

Can anyone offer some insight into this, and also maybe some ideas as to good areas for men to head into when it comes to being a new nurse?

Thanks to all!

PMFB-RN, RN

5,350 Posts

Specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Trauma Rapid Response.

Frequient exposure to things you are squemish about should de-sensitize you to them. There will always be something you can't stand but with time you can learn to tolerate about anything. I grew up hunting and fishing. Cleaning fish and game guts removed and squeamishness in me.

I work in the ICU. About half the nurses in my unit are men. Usually men are attracted to ER/ICU for the independance those units offer and we like to work with technology. Don't decide on what you want to do right now. You will be exposed to different areas of nursing in school and can make a more informed decision later. Nursing is a great job for men IMO.

PacoUSA, BSN, RN

3,445 Posts

Specializes in ICU / PCU / Telemetry / Oncology.

When I was younger, I think the squeamishness of everything that was involved with nursing was a major factor for me not entering the field, which in essence was a regret because I wish I had entered the field sooner. Now here I am changing my career 20 years later. PMFB is correct, the more you're exposed to things, the more they become run of the mill. I would not let that deter you from entering the profession - if your heart is really into nursing you will have the will to overcome that.

Your post however sounds like you want to go into nursing for more job security (nothing wrong with that, just that it should not be the only reason). Really make sure that you want to enter the profession primarily to help and advocate for the patient, job security and all that entails should be the bonus. Since you're married to an RN, I hope that somehow you have come to embrace that same desire to help people.

As for what areas are good for men to enter, I agree ER and ICU are most popular, especially cardiac. I personally want to enter neonatal / NICU because I was once a preemie and I have a need for giving back. I also feel I would get the most satisfaction in that area.

Good luck!

BigRussKCMO

38 Posts

My opinion is get your EMT Basic certification (about 6 months) which costs roughly 700 bucks. A great way to decide if nursing is what you want

Specializes in ICU.
My opinion is get your EMT Basic certification (about 6 months) which costs roughly 700 bucks. A great way to decide if nursing is what you want

The EMT route can also expose you to lots of "interesting" stuff, which can help desensitize you to blood/guts/feces/vomit/whatever.

It DOES get better with time.

plowboy911

34 Posts

Specializes in TELE / ER/PACU/ICU.

I recommend you check out radiology tech program or even a pharmacy tech program. No blood or gore there, at least not what you have to deal with all the time. Yeah, you will have to xray a trauma or something now and then, but might be a better fit for you. I can think of dozens of things i would do before choosing nursing for its job security (not saying this is the only reason you want to do it).

silliemunkie

13 Posts

I got my EMT-B, and it was a big deciding factor in becoming a Nurse. Due to military obligations, i had to put my nursing on hold for about 7 years. I'm hoping to start this fall, or next spring. This is my second career, and is a big step in the opposite direction from what I'm currently doing. Right now i'm a programmer/business analyst. I really like the technology part, but nursing is something that i have always wanted to do, and now i have the opportunity.

If this is something you really want to do, go for it!

Jason

Crumb

17 Posts

There is a very big difference between watching something being done and doing it yourself. If you're the one having to take care of the the squeamish stuff, you will get used to it very fast. Take needles for example. A lot of people have a fear of needles. In fact when I am just standing back watching someone give a shot or start an I.V. I get a little squeamish myself but If I am the one giving the shot or starting the I.V. I don't get squeamish at all.

karenG

1,049 Posts

Specializes in midwifery, ophthalmics, general practice.

I've been in nursing 30yrs now.. and I cant stand the sight of blood.. I'm very squeamish. most nurses have an area they prefer not to work in; for me that orthopaedics.. anything to do with bones and I'm out cold!! but having said that, I love ophthalmology.. and most nurses hate that field!! I also cant watch operations on TV or go to any films that are rated above a PG!! But.. put me in a situation where I need to be professional and care for someone.. well I can do that. Its amazing how much you can do for a patient when you need to.

good luck

Karen

FreudianSlip

41 Posts

Specializes in Behavioral Health.
I recommend you check out radiology tech program or even a pharmacy tech program. No blood or gore there, at least not what you have to deal with all the time. Yeah, you will have to xray a trauma or something now and then, but might be a better fit for you. I can think of dozens of things i would do before choosing nursing for its job security (not saying this is the only reason you want to do it).

I agree...there are other jobs with similar pay and job security that you might want to look into first. In addition to the above, check out medical technologist (2 yr, 4 yr programs). If you are seriously considering nursing...you should get a CNA/tech job in a hospital to see the work firsthand. There is a big difference between hearing/seeing nurses and actually doing the work. Lots of students go in to culture shock when they actually hit the floors!

TheHomelessRN

11 Posts

Spare yourself the drama I looked at a hospital today and didn't see one Rn job but they had plenty Therapist jobs. The schools have fattened there pockets on our backs with all this we need more nurses propaganda. Why have I applied to over 20 places and still no job. It cracks me up literally. The two interviews I've had the interviewer actually had the Nerve to have a yellow support the troops sticker in there office. Yes this profession supports the Troops in wasting there Gi Bill on a joke.

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