Being a man in the field - page 2

Hi all i'm a female pre- nursing student and was just wandering how you men felt being in a class with mostly women.Is it uncomfortable?How do you cope and why did you choose it as a career?Hope i... Read More

  1. by   rclimbr
    I was a computer tech before starting nursing school and it smells better. When you are in a class with all women sometime they forget i am there and start man bashing. It doesn't even bother me any more. I am married and have 2 kids its kinda fun to listen to.
  2. by   agent
    I find I get more attention as the favored one of two guys in our group. The extra attention can be both good and bad. Basically I'm always under the spotlight so while I get the attention I best be prepared not to f-up.
  3. by   Jack Burton
    I'll probably get flamed for this, but being a male in class really allows you to enjoy the class dynamic (read: cattiness) that I have noticed follows groups of women from diverse backgrounds. It can be quite entertaining.......
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from Jack Burton
    I'll probably get flamed for this, but being a male in class really allows you to enjoy the class dynamic (read: cattiness) that I have noticed follows groups of women from diverse backgrounds. It can be quite entertaining.......

    You need to be flamed, but that's not in the TOS. So I'll bite my tongue.
  5. by   vamedic4
    I think that uneasiness is much more prevalent when you're younger, but even when I was young and had only females in my class..it never really bothered me...oh, unless they smelled something foul...then YOU were targeted since girls don't fart

    As a younger male nursing student (many years ago) I thought it was great...hello, what guy wouldn't want to be surrounded by 100 women??

    Just my little opinion...


    vamedic4
  6. by   PcolaNurse
    I was one of only 5 guys in my class of 49 and it never was an issue. Like others posted, I made friends with a few of the girls in my other non-nursing classes and the friendships just carried over.

    I actually enjoyed my Peds-OB clinical more because I was a guy! I wasn't allowed, as a male, to care for the patients after delivery. Sexist as hell but I didn't care because that just meant that I got to spend two extra rotations in the newborn nursery...and Peds is what I wanted from the start anyway!!

    -Kevin
  7. by   clean_fun_2
    ladies cover up your goods. if i want a show i will get it at home.


    btw hey pcolanurse, my father lives in cantonment.
    Last edit by clean_fun_2 on Sep 1, '06
  8. by   PcolaNurse
    Quote from clean_fun_2
    ladies cover up your goods. if i want a show i will get it at home.


    btw hey pcolanurse, my father lives in cantonment.
    hey clean .... i'm actually in cantonment as well....just down the road from tate high school!
  9. by   bitterguy
    Don't take this personally, BUT, how do you like living in a man dominated society with no apparent end in sight?

    I'm a man and a nursing student; but I'm also a husband, father, son, brother, mountain biker, xc skier, homebrewer, bike communter, environmentalist, conservationist, etc...

    I am not threatened by a person's sex, I regard you as you, a human being.

    BTW, I'll be in line to vote for Hilary Clinton in 2008 if she chooses to run.

    Ciao
  10. by   Asklepios
    Quote from bitterguy
    BTW, I'll be in line to vote for Hilary Clinton in 2008 if she chooses to run.
    No offense, but if she does run, I hope you forget when it's election day, or oversleep or something.
  11. by   Roy Fokker
    Gentlemen,

    The 2008 Presidential Election has nothing to do with this topic.
    Let's get back on track please...
  12. by   KatieKt
    My LPN class had 65% male and 35% female. Oh yeah, that was the military LPN course! Doh! I'm so used to having more guys around that I dont know what I'm going to do when I get into my civilian classes! hehe. Just kidding. I'm sure it will be fine.
  13. by   omeconium
    Presumable the majority of us are adults. However, some of the postings that I have seen make me wonder! "Cover up your goods???" Most of us have spent years studying the human body both male and female. Why is it no big deal for a female nurse to insert a catheter into a male but having a male at a birth forbidden? I was particularly offended by the male nursing student that was "happy" that he was excused from class during an OB rotation because he wasn't 'allowed' to do postpartum care. I would have been infuriated!!!
    I am a male and after six months in the float pool I applied and received placement in mother newborn. After six months I was trained as a tech. I started out knowing that I wanted to be part of the birthing process but worked all over the hospital to make sure. At 41 I started school doing the prerequisites to become a PA. After learning that the medical philosophy "diagnosis and repairs illness and injury" I redirected my efforts into nursing. Nursing creates "an environment of wellbeing to promote healing." Being pregnant is not an illness!
    I attend class with primarily women, my instructors are all women, my nurses are exclusively women, and my patients are certainly women. I swim in an estrogen ocean. I am definitely not gay, but there is nothing sexy about birth. Nine months prior to birth was sexy. Almost all of the nurses like having me around, except two maybe three but they are about to retire. They are of the generation that thinks men should be autoclaved before allowed to look at a baby though the window. I have never had a problem with my patients during a vaginal birth or clean up afterward. I am a scrub tech during C-sections and my patients would not like me to be absent. My instructors are my biggest obstacle. They have antiquated ideas of what men should be allowed to do. I don't think all men have the maturity to work in obstetrics (particularly after reading this) but for those that do there should not be the barriers that exist. How many male OB MD's are there?? Are we a profession or not? I believe is takes a special person (either male or female) to be an OB nurse. We need to stop worrying about what is or isn't between our legs and adjust what is between our ears and get rid of the sexist ideas of the past.

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