Lvn school vs rn school

Nurses General Nursing

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anyone here an LVN? how difficult is LVN school vs Rn school? what gpa did you have/how many units did you have in college that allowed you pass LVN school? is there any way to prepare for LVN school? how much did you pay for LVN school? is there another way of going through LVN school aside from going to community college? like through a hospital program? is there a such thing? thanks for your help guys.

chrisciwi

51 Posts

Hey I'm not a LVN but my sister became one before moving onto her BSN. She actually got her LVN license while going to school for nursing (I think it was her 2nd or 3rd year) So I am guessing that it has the exact same classes, but don't quote me lol. If you have the chance, go to nursing school, most LVN's I know are going to school for nursing part time or at night

pagandeva2000, LPN

7,984 Posts

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.
anyone here an LVN? how difficult is LVN school vs Rn school? what gpa did you have/how many units did you have in college that allowed you pass LVN school? is there any way to prepare for LVN school? how much did you pay for LVN school? is there another way of going through LVN school aside from going to community college? like through a hospital program? is there a such thing? thanks for your help guys.

It is hard for me to compare the difference between LPN and RN school since I only went the LPN route. I can say, however, that both nursing programs require a strong commitment, organization and time management (which I cannot express enough). Many people that did go both routes do state that the LPN program was more condensed-usually a Monday thru Friday full time commitment (like 8-4), which includes clinicals once or twice a week. If you attend a vocational school, you may not have to worry about college credits or GPA but have to take an entrance exam. It may be the NLN (that is the one test I heard of, but there are others), which includes reading, math, science and writing skills, then, some require an essay. In my area, there are no hospital programs, but they have vocational schools that usually last from 9-18 months, then, taking NCLEX-PN (the state boards)and must pass in order to practice.

The best thing to do is to inquire about LPN programs in your area (the board of nursing of your state usually has a website that lists programs in your geographical area) and see what they say regarding entrance and requirements. Good luck!

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

102 Articles; 27,612 Posts

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

I have been an LVN for the past 3.5 years, and I'm currently enrolled in an RN program.

I attended a trade school LVN program that involved no prerequisite classes or entrance requirements other than possessing a high school education and passing an entrance exam. The tuition was very expensive at nearly $20,000.

Since I am now attending an RN program, I feel somewhat qualified to comment on the level of difficulty between the two levels of nursing education. Both programs involve plenty of studying and abstract thought in order to comprehend the material being presented. The major difference, in my opinion, is that the RN program focuses more on critical thinking skills, more detailed assessment techniques, leadership, and a deeper level of pathophysiology.

Specializes in LTC.

I am 51 days away from graduating LPN school.

It moves very fast and as with all nursing programs, requires a HUGE commitment. They told us on the first day.. you will all gain 10 pounds. Some of you will have relationship problems, some will get pregnant, some of you will need to leave or cut back on your jobs. You will all have no life and will be sleeping, eating, and breathing nursing. and thats all 100% correct.

As for the requirements and the cost, depends on the program. Usually an LPN would require a HS diploma. RN program wants liberal arts prereqs.

mashamontago

123 Posts

It is hard for me to compare the difference between LPN and RN school since I only went the LPN route. I can say, however, that both nursing programs require a strong commitment, organization and time management (which I cannot express enough). Many people that did go both routes do state that the LPN program was more condensed-usually a Monday thru Friday full time commitment (like 8-4), which includes clinicals once or twice a week. If you attend a vocational school, you may not have to worry about college credits or GPA but have to take an entrance exam. It may be the NLN (that is the one test I heard of, but there are others), which includes reading, math, science and writing skills, then, some require an essay. In my area, there are no hospital programs, but they have vocational schools that usually last from 9-18 months, then, taking NCLEX-PN (the state boards)and must pass in order to practice.

The best thing to do is to inquire about LPN programs in your area (the board of nursing of your state usually has a website that lists programs in your geographical area) and see what they say regarding entrance and requirements. Good luck!

how hard is the nclex-pn? what's the exam like? how did you study for the nclex pn? did you use review books for the nclex pn? what are the books you would use to pass the nclex-pn exam?

caliotter3

38,333 Posts

The NCLEX PN is comparable to the NCLEX RN. There are review books in bookstores specific to each test. You study the same way. The major difference between the two schools lies in the admissions process. If you attend a proprietary LVN school, you take an entrance exam and produce your high school diploma. If you attend an LVN program in a community college, you will have an admissions experience more like that of the RN program, competition, waiting lists, prerequisites. Your best bet if you want to become an LVN is to find a school that is associated with an adult education program or ROP. These programs are usually the best and the cheapest. Next, come community college programs for cost. Proprietary programs are the most expensive. These schools tend to have the reputation of disorganization and less than optimal classroom and clinical experience.

nerdtonurse?, BSN, RN

1 Article; 2,043 Posts

Specializes in ICU, Telemetry.

Having done the LPN (LVN in my state) and now 1/2 way thru the RN, the actual course work doesn't seem that different so far. I mean, we're covering the same topics, and COPD is COPD is COPD....

I have a natural curiosity about pretty much everything, so I also studied RN books while in LPN school, and now I'm looking at CCRN study guides while in RN school. Actually LPN seemed harder, because everything was new and it was 5 days a week. In RN school, I'm in class 2 days, and clinicals 2 days. In terms of patho, I haven't really learned that much more than I already knew. I really didn't study as much as I could have, and got a very high B.

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