Would It Be Better To Be A Lpn First, Then Go For Rn?

  1. HI.. DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY ADVICE?? WOULD IT BE EASIER TO GO FOR LPN FIRST BEFORE JUMPING INTO RN PROGRAM?? IM NERVOUS ABOUT ALL THE MATH AND CHEMISTRY CLASSES FOR RN THEY SEEM TO BE REALLY HARD. SO NOW IM WONDERING IF I SHOULD EASE INTO THIS SLOWER..??
    HELP PLEASE!
    THANKS! wannabaRN
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    About wannabaRN

    Joined: Sep '06; Posts: 8; Likes: 1

    60 Comments

  3. by   DelanaRN
    Well, if there wasn't a waiting list for RN schools, I would be doing that first. However, there is a waiting list here and my husband is active duty Army, so we move every couple years and I don't want to be in the middle of a program and then have to relocate. So, I am going the LPN route, then RN route at a later date. My husband has his BSN so I have a built in tutor. My mother in law was an LPN prior to becoming an RN. I start LPN school next month. If I really love doing LPN I might stick with that, but since my goal is to be an RN and work Labor and Delivery, I think eventually I will go on to get my RN. Although, If I could do it now, (and skip LPN) I would!! That seems to be where the choices and good pay is. Good luck with your decision.
  4. by   Jules A
    There are benefits to doing it each way. The down side for me about getting my LPN first is that now I'm going to have to back track a little with the "ADN bridge" class which I find frustrating because the same programs offering the bridge have their LPNs and RNs in exactly the same classes except the LPNs stop after the third semester. The major plus for me was that I wasn't even sure if I nursing would be my cup of tea so with the one year program I felt that I could just push through and at least have something. Many of my fellow students also considered the benefit of being able to work for LPN wages while finishing school. Most LPN programs require almost the same pre-reqs as the RN so if you are mostly worried about math and chemistry etc. you may need that for the LPN program anyway. Good luck with whatever you decide. Jules
  5. by   NurseHeather1
    There are benefits to doing either. I took the LPN route to start with so that I could start working quicker and gain expeirence while going for my RN. I know alot of people who have done this. It is really working out for me.

    Good luck!
    heather
  6. by   gradgitated
    I have talked with people on both sides of this issue and the popular opinion is that going for your LPN first is the way to go IF the school you attend offers it as a summer course between your first and second year of their ADN program. Some of my classmates did it and they were glad that they did....working for better wages (as an LPN) allowed them the luxury of working less hours per week and freed up valuable time.
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    I agree that there are benefits either way. What you have to look at is your lifestyle and personal needs. In many states the waiting list is long, and also, some of these schools want really high GPAs to enter into the RN programs. In New York, chemistry is not a requirement for LPN, but most (not all) RN schools do require chemistry and microbiology. I cannot figure out the reason for chemistry because I have not seen an RN utilize chemistry for any reason (if there are RNs out there that actually use it, please enlighten me...I have not seen them use it or even remember it for that matter).

    Best wishes to you...you will decide what is best for you!
  8. by   gradgitated
    I, too, have been wondering about the chemistry requirement that most schools have. One possible explanation is that mastering the material might give some indication as to a candidate's ability to master nursing school material. Also, requiring candidates to pass certain courses does generate alot of money for the school (like speech class and English 101...LOL!)
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from gradgitated
    I, too, have been wondering about the chemistry requirement that most schools have. One possible explanation is that mastering the material might give some indication as to a candidate's ability to master nursing school material. Also, requiring candidates to pass certain courses does generate alot of money for the school (like speech class and English 101...LOL!)
    I agree with you...it may be a money thing. Most of the courses can be condensed into the nursing program because it is using common sense. It does give an indication of their ability to master the nursing material...but again, hey, there are still screwed up nurses that were straight A students...LOL
  10. by   DutchgirlRN
    From personal experience, LPN/RN, I would invest your time and money going for your RN right from the start.
  11. by   mimimartina
    No way! Been there, done that! Here in Louisiana, LPNs are "vocational/technical" and therefore, NO classes I took in LPN school count toward my RN. I am starting over as if I were never anything even after 13 years of working as LPN. In fact, I worked for the state for a while, and at one facility, I was not even included at the nurse's meetings, due to we were considered "medication people", and if you look on the state website for employment opportunities, LPNs are listed under non-professional...Go for the RN, skip the LPN, unless you would be satisfied as LPN. If you know you're going for RN, don't waste precious time on the LPN course.
  12. by   Jules A
    Quote from mimimartina
    NO classes I took in LPN school count toward my RN.
    Thats a shame, in many states with the LPN to ADN bridge programs you start in the second year of the RN program with credit for the first year from your LPN classes.
  13. by   bcskittlez
    Yes and this is not the case in the majority of states. Your LVN does account for something, it accounts for admission to the LVN to RN program, if you take the prerequisite classes that you need. There is also the online option in most states as well. It can be a great step toward your RN.
  14. by   CHATSDALE
    in louisiana you can take a accelerated program which ids ROUGH but it gets you ad-rn degree if you are licensed as an lpn
    but i agree if at all possible go for rn but the important thing is to get started if yoour husband is military there are a lot of places you can be sent that do not hire lpns england comes to mind off hand
    you can get a lot of experience as an lpn which will help you doing the work even if the credits are not accepted

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