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LPN-bridge-RN

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Heyyyy everyone...I'm starting the RN bridge program next month. I'm excited and a lil nervous. Anyway why are people telling me it's so hard?

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

Because it is?

Because it is?

I just finished LPN in October and I feel ready...but with everyone saying it's so hard I'm wondering what makes it harder?

proud nurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in Medical Oncology, Alzheimer/dementia. Has 15 years experience.

I was an LPN for 11 years before I did the bridge program. Being out of school for such a long time is what made it hard for me.

I was an LPN for 11 years before I did the bridge program. Being out of school for such a long time is what made it hard for me.

Well that's understandable makes sense...I don't know what to expect 🙈

Phoenix16, RN, MSN

Specializes in Forensic Nurse. Has 6 years experience.

Congrats!!!

In my honest opinion it will be what you make it. I'm almost certain that the LPN program was no walk in the park, so do not expect the RN program to be either. The fact that you just completed the LPN program will definitely work in your favor; because most topics are still very fresh in your brain. However, don't let that "freshness" delude you from the fact that it will require a lot of studying and great time management. I wish you all the best and good luck.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I found LPN school to be the most difficult although I'm sure some of that was the shock factor of the nursing school culture and my ADN wasn't far behind. BSN was the easiest and MS was fairly easy also. My LPN-RN bridge program was intense and like the LPN program I basically white knuckled it through. It was crucial to remain on top of studies and get good grades on exams. Something else I will add regarding peer relationships is that it would behoove you to be extra friendly and humble because if your fellow students are threatened by you because you are already a nurse it can make it rough. You need your peer's support so keep that in mind as you try to fit in with a group who has already been together for a year or more. Good luck!

Phoenix16, RN, MSN

Specializes in Forensic Nurse. Has 6 years experience.

I found LPN school to be the most difficult although I'm sure some of that was the shock factor of the nursing school culture and my ADN wasn't far behind. BSN was the easiest and MS was fairly easy also. My LPN-RN bridge program was intense and like the LPN program I basically white knuckled it through. It was crucial to remain on top of studies and get good grades on exams. Something else I will add regarding peer relationships is that it would behoove you to be extra friendly and humble because if your fellow students are threatened by you because you are already a nurse it can make it rough. You need your peer's support so keep that in mind as you try to fit in with a group who has already been together for a year or more. Good luck!

Thank you for mentioning the part about humbling and peer relations. Even though I consider myself to be an introvert, I am usually quick to answer questions without regards to others in the classroom. So I appreciate you bringing that up. Thanks.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

With well calculated but genuine sucking up I was fortunate that most of my classmates were gracious and willing to help me. :) Things that aren't necessarily intuitive such as which professors exam questions came right off the power points, which were from the textbook etc. was invaluable.

The thing that mentally took some of the pressure off me was the thought that I was already a nurse and even if I flunked out of the ADN program I was still a nurse, lol, maybe not the most confident approach but it relieved some of my anxiety.

vintage_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience.

I'm currently in a bridging program and found both to be difficult in different ways. The PN program was difficult in that I was learning to be a nurse...learning skills for the first time and not even knowing how to properly mobilize or wash someone...it's very nerve racking. But it wasn't really "book hard." The bridging program has pretty much zero skills training but is very difficult in terms of advanced sciences and research...so in that respect it is quite "book" difficult but i already know nursing basics so it's not stressful in that way....get what I mean?

I'm currently in a bridging program and found both to be difficult in different ways. The PN program was difficult in that I was learning to be a nurse...learning skills for the first time and not even knowing how to properly mobilize or wash someone...it's very nerve racking. But it wasn't really "book hard." The bridging program has pretty much zero skills training but is very difficult in terms of advanced sciences and research...so in that respect it is quite "book" difficult but i already know nursing basics so it's not stressful in that way....get what I mean?

Thanks!

I found LPN school to be the most difficult although I'm sure some of that was the shock factor of the nursing school culture and my ADN wasn't far behind. BSN was the easiest and MS was fairly easy also. My LPN-RN bridge program was intense and like the LPN program I basically white knuckled it through. It was crucial to remain on top of studies and get good grades on exams. Something else I will add regarding peer relationships is that it would behoove you to be extra friendly and humble because if your fellow students are threatened by you because you are already a nurse it can make it rough. You need your peer's support so keep that in mind as you try to fit in with a group who has already been together for a year or more. Good luck!

Thank you!

CT Pixie, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

I did the LPN to RN bridge 5 years after finishing up my LPN schooling.

In all honesty, I felt my LPN courses were more difficult than my RN classes. I think it was because a lot of the RN nursing classes were in things I had taken in the LPN courses. (Med/Surg, Maternity, psych etc.). My LPN teachers taught EVERYTHING that was in the text and tested on it. My RN classes were almost like a refresher for things I had already learned. The LPN schooling was intense..multiple classes testing at least once if not twice a week. And we had med/surg 5 days a week for hours however the RN classes were only 2 or 3 times week for 1 1/2 hrs to 3 hrs a week and only one nursing class at a time.

Hardest thing for me..remembering I was just a student during clinicals and to act as such. i pained me to wait forever for the instructor to do my med pass with me. I'd been passing meds for 5 years, full time to 34 LTC patients..and to have to be supervised drove me nuts.

The same clinical instructor who would say, 'you are JUST a student now' would also turn and say 'you are already a nurse you should know this' if I asked a question or if she rapid fired off questions and caught me off guard..well, which is it lady? Am I to act as just a student and be afforded the luxury of asking questions like any other student in this class and get an answer OR am i to know it all and not ask b/c i'm already a nurse and act like a nurse.if the latter, then back off when i'm giving a senna tablet (LOL).

I did the LPN to RN bridge 5 years after finishing up my LPN schooling.

In all honesty, I felt my LPN courses were more difficult than my RN classes. I think it was because a lot of the RN nursing classes were in things I had taken in the LPN courses. (Med/Surg, Maternity, psych etc.). My LPN teachers taught EVERYTHING that was in the text and tested on it. My RN classes were almost like a refresher for things I had already learned. The LPN schooling was intense..multiple classes testing at least once if not twice a week. And we had med/surg 5 days a week for hours however the RN classes were only 2 or 3 times week for 1 1/2 hrs to 3 hrs a week and only one nursing class at a time.

Hardest thing for me..remembering I was just a student during clinicals and to act as such. i pained me to wait forever for the instructor to do my med pass with me. I'd been passing meds for 5 years, full time to 34 LTC patients..and to have to be supervised drove me nuts.

The same clinical instructor who would say, 'you are JUST a student now' would also turn and say 'you are already a nurse you should know this' if I asked a question or if she rapid fired off questions and caught me off guard..well, which is it lady? Am I to act as just a student and be afforded the luxury of asking questions like any other student in this class and get an answer OR am i to know it all and not ask b/c i'm already a nurse and act like a nurse.if the latter, then back off when i'm giving a senna tablet (LOL).

Omg I love this thank you . This was helpful

Hi there, I am a new LPN (about a year of clinical experience) and I am applying for the LPN - RN bridge program at Gordon College in Ga. I have been given mixed reviews on the Bridge program. I was shocked to hear people say they would rather start over at day 1 in RN school than to do a bridge program. I am not sure how it works at your school but here at Gordon, the bridging students drop in the 3rd semester of the ASN and finish up with them. I assume it depends on the type of experience you have gained while out working as an LPN, how long it's been since you were in school and whether or not you feel comfortable dropping in on the program mid stream. I would love to hear how things go- Where are you and what school are you attending?

Thanks-

Kasey

Hi there, I am a new LPN (about a year of clinical experience) and I am applying for the LPN - RN bridge program at Gordon College in Ga. I have been given mixed reviews on the Bridge program. I was shocked to hear people say they would rather start over at day 1 in RN school than to do a bridge program. I am not sure how it works at your school but here at Gordon, the bridging students drop in the 3rd semester of the ASN and finish up with them. I assume it depends on the type of experience you have gained while out working as an LPN, how long it's been since you were in school and whether or not you feel comfortable dropping in on the program mid stream. I would love to hear how things go- Where are you and what school are you attending?

Thanks-

Kasey

Wow I never heard of that. That sounds crazy. That's not fair for students who are new nurses without experience...well I'm in New York...I'm attending CUNY Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn NY

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I am not sure how it works at your school but here at Gordon, the bridging students drop in the 3rd semester of the ASN and finish up with them.

This was how my program was and it wasn't bad at all. There were some things I already knew but plenty I didn't. I can't imagine why anyone would rather start over and do 4 semesters instead of 2? That doesn't make sense and I would want some clarification and examples why they are saying that before I accepted it as meaningful.

This was how my program was and it wasn't bad at all. There were some things I already knew but plenty I didn't. I can't imagine why anyone would rather start over and do 4 semesters instead of 2? That doesn't make sense and I would want some clarification and examples why they are saying that before I accepted it as meaningful.

I don't know all I know is LPN to RN program is 15months long and I start when everyone that's doing the RN program starts.