Looking for opinions on school

Published

I have several options. I can start Paramedic school Jan. 2015 then go back to RN school at a later point. On the other hand, I can attend LPN school and then either do a LPN to RN bridge or just start the RN program from scratch (but in 2017). I'd attend LPN school, graduate, and then apply for LPN-RN or RN school.

The reason I have to wait to apply for the RN program is due to me having to retake a class, but I do qualify for the LPN and Paramedic program. I know this is a nursing forum, so I don't expect to find much support for being a medic, but I'd like an unbiased a answer as possbile.

I can see faults with both sides. One, LPNs still get paid better than medics. I can go on to being an RN later on. On the flip side, I am a male and I wouldn't have to deal with all the sterotypes thrust upon me for being a male nurse. I guess all of my reasons are very vain, but maybe there's something I haven't thought of.

Thoughts?

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

In my organization, 12% of our RNs are male.... there may be parts of the country where the "stereotype" still exists, but it's not here. If nursing is your goal, opt for the more streamlined approach rather than wasting time in a multi-step process. It'll save you a lot of time and money.

Thujone

1 Article; 317 Posts

Has 1 years experience.

I agree with you but I wouldn't be able to start an RN program until Fall 2017 regardless of what I choose to do. In the mean time I could attend my community college lpn program that last 12 months while waiting on RN school to start.

jcnyc

25 Posts

I agree with you but I wouldn't be able to start an RN program until Fall 2017 regardless of what I choose to do. In the mean time I could attend my community college lpn program that last 12 months while waiting on RN school to start.

It is my opinion that neither the fastest route nor the cheapest route is necessarily the best route. From what I have observed on a personal level (whether my own friends who are nurses, or np) here on the forum or other nursing career websites, besides having your BSN/RN, your work experience is one of the most important aspects of your employ-ability. Which route is going to offer you the most real-life experience and translate into your goal of RN in the future? If you have an opportunity as a paramedic to work in certain clinical areas that you wouldn't be able to as an LPN then it makes more sense to do that. And vice versa.

So looking at financially which route makes the most sense?

Cost of the program vs. salary?

Also you want to consider your end game or final goal. If you are having an issue (vanity as you've said) with regards to others expectations/opinions now what happens when you are an actual RN?

If that is the case maybe you may actually want to consider doing the LPN more as a "trial by fire" and see if you have what it takes to deal with the stereotypes etc..

What do you think?

Veigar3

52 Posts

If you're an RN, you can still work in the field on an ambulance, if you're that worried about your pride. CCRNs in ambulance services make a good living, and you'd pretty much be in charge. In some states, I've heard you can challenge the paramedic licensing exam if you're already an RN, so I'd research that too.

Specializes in Prior military RN/current ICU RN.. Has 16 years experience.

What "stereotypes" are you talking about? If you are using vanity as your deciding factor for nursing I think you may be looking into the wrong area. It is a daily hard grind and the last thing on your mind will be vanity and stereotypes. It will be getting your labs done after your 3rd night shift in a row.

nurse2033, MSN, RN

3 Articles; 2,133 Posts

Specializes in ER, ICU.

Forget about the crap you read about being a man and a nurse. Just like in a bar, or the jungle, or at the ballet, being a man is what you define it to be. I wouldn't use LPN as a step to being an RN, it will only take that much longer to become an RN. Do you want to be a paramedic? Or a nurse? (I'm both). The working environment is very different and they both have a lot of pluses and minuses. It all depends on you. Good luck.

Thujone

1 Article; 317 Posts

Has 1 years experience.
It is my opinion that neither the fastest route nor the cheapest route is necessarily the best route. From what I have observed on a personal level (whether my own friends who are nurses, or np) here on the forum or other nursing career websites, besides having your BSN/RN, your work experience is one of the most important aspects of your employ-ability. Which route is going to offer you the most real-life experience and translate into your goal of RN in the future? If you have an opportunity as a paramedic to work in certain clinical areas that you wouldn't be able to as an LPN then it makes more sense to do that. And vice versa.

So looking at financially which route makes the most sense?

Cost of the program vs. salary?

Also you want to consider your end game or final goal. If you are having an issue (vanity as you've said) with regards to others expectations/opinions now what happens when you are an actual RN?

If that is the case maybe you may actually want to consider doing the LPN more as a "trial by fire" and see if you have what it takes to deal with the stereotypes etc..

What do you think?

The LPN program is 3 semesters and the medic program is 5 semesters and they are at the same school, so the cost per credit hour is the same, but obvsiously the LPN program will be cheaper.

I like your trial-by-fire idea. I hadn't thought of it like that. I currently work as a CMA (AAMA) along side a lot of RNs and 1 LPN, and we do the same things, but of course this is in a pediatric office. As far as I know I've never been sterotyped yet, and I always have an intersting time talking to the girls there, but I can't pretend that's not the case in LTC where most LPNs work. I worked as a CNA and I had problems getting some of the facility members letting me perform the duties of the job, one of the male residents didn't want me because they he assumed I was gay (granted he gave everyone a hard time), and some of the females didn't want me because they were too embarrassed to let a male work on them granted this was a very small amount of residents who did this as well. I suppose that doesn't really matter though because the LPNs there really only passed out meds and did wound care, so changing dirty briefs wouldn't be an issue.

Empire77

1 Post

I would say only do the paramedic program if you really want to work as one. I was in a similar situation where I was very interested in a paramedic program vs. an RN program. Now I am in my senior year of my BSN and I am glad I just stuck with RN. Whatever your goal is I would just work towards that as fast as you are able.

As for being a guy. I have worked as a CNA in a hospital since I started nursing school and I can say that there isn't really any stereotyping. You won't see any negative stereotyping especially among other medical professionals. Today there are not just male CNA's and nurses on the unit. There are always transporters, people from lab, and any other support staff around at random times that are guys. As for patients not wanting you to take care of them: if an old lady doesn't want you to wipe her isn't that really a win for you? Haha. You just have to go into it confidently. I have only dealt with one person saying "oh that's great that your going to be a male nurse." He was an idiot anyway. Don't think of yourself as a "male nurse" just as a nurse.