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does it look bad to quit a CNA job while in nursing school?

CNA/MA   (4,907 Views 10 Comments)
by loveoutloud loveoutloud (New Member) New Member

3,901 Visitors; 84 Posts

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I am a nursing student and I work as a CNA in home care on a casual basis. I do like the job for the most part, but the way I am treated as a casual employee is making me want to quit the job.

I get paid for what I work, not for the shift duration. For example, yesterday my shift lasted 9 hours 30 minutes, but I was paid 6 hours 20 minutes. My "off time" is spent driving from house to house (not paid for this) as it takes longer with each client than i am allotted (the people have very particular ways of doing things, and give me specific instructions that takes longer than the 20 minutes or so it should). For every shift, I am paid at least 2-3 hours less than the time I spend being on duty, and since it is usually only 10-15 minutes between clients, I have no time to do anything but drive to the next house. I do not get gas money between clients, only for half of my way there and back. If they call me and I do not accept the shift, the supervisor gets mad (the one I refused today i was about to email her to change my availability but she called with the shift before i got around to it).

Some people and their families are very rude and am angry if I am even 5 minutes late, which I do realize comes with the job. Others are very rude if I don't do things the way they want (which is hard to learn their routines when I only see them once).

The other main issue with the job is the region I work in is a 45 minute drive from my house, which can be over an hour is slippery winter mornings. Also, may shifts are early in the morning befire roads are cleared. I do not think a job is worth risking my life in dangerous road contitions.

I have no desire to work in home health after I graduate, but i am afraid it would look bad if I were to quit this job, and think it may also help me get a job in the future. Would it look bad if I quit this job after only working 4 months?

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chicookie has 8 years experience and works as a RN BSN.

10,610 Visitors; 985 Posts

I was on the floor after nursing school for three months and I got offered a better RN position, it was non clinical but the hours and pay were better and so I took it. Now I am looking to go back to clinical nursing and I am having a really difficult time. I even got chewed out by a nurse recuiter. He said that because of what I did, it showed that I couldn't cut it as a nurse and that no one would hire me. (O_O) Two months after, I am still looking for a job and still running into the same problem. So far he is right about the no one would hire me part. (-_-)

My advice: try to tough it out as much as you can until you find a new place of employement because especially in areas where nurses are in demand they are being really nitpicky about details such as how long you worked a job. I wouldn't even bother to put it on my resume if it's only a month or two. not worth it. Just my two cents though.

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xxkmpxx has 3 years experience and works as a Hospice CNA.

2,233 Visitors; 70 Posts

I would definetly quit or look for a better job. I do Hospice for an agency and drive too from patient to patient or to facility. I get paid for ALL time driven, and ALL miles as well. I do not think you are being treated fair. Like the other poster said, I wouldnt put on my resume if it were only for a month or two as well. Just give your 2 weeks anyways and finish it up so you leave on good terms. I would try and find another job somewhere else.

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WannaBNursey works as a RN.

14,026 Visitors; 544 Posts

Keep your job until you have something better. Actively search while still employed. When you're interviewed and asked what is wrong with your employer just tell them the truth. Try to get a hospital job or a job where you'd like to work after you graduate with your RN. Is this your only CNA job? Work for them for 2 more months and most places will seriously consider your experience. You should be able to get hired in a SNF or LTC at this time. Just say you'd like a more stable job in a facility where you know how much and for for how many hours you'll actually be paid.

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3,901 Visitors; 84 Posts

Here's the thing-- I don't really want another job. I am only working so it can look good on my resume when I am looking for a nursing job. I am just worried that it would look bad to quit. I have been with the company since september now, but since it#s only a casual job, I have only worked 12-15 shifts in total. (usually every other weekend, some evenings and now that it is the break i have been getting some day shifts.

Where I live CNA jobs are VERY VERY difficult to obtain, and I am not willing to stay here until i get one.

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RunnerRN2015 works as a ER nurse.

20,640 Visitors; 790 Posts

Here's the thing-- I don't really want another job. I am only working so it can look good on my resume when I am looking for a nursing job. I am just worried that it would look bad to quit. I have been with the company since september now, but since it#s only a casual job, I have only worked 12-15 shifts in total. (usually every other weekend, some evenings and now that it is the break i have been getting some day shifts.

Where I live CNA jobs are VERY VERY difficult to obtain, and I am not willing to stay here until i get one.

If you don't need to work, then quit. If a future employer asks why you quit tell them the scheduling didn't fit in with your school schedule. I was working at a nursing home earlier this year. After a few weeks, I knew I couldn't work there. The facility was really nice but I dreaded going to work; LTC is NOT for me. My DON was a graduate of my school so when I said, "I'm having a difficult time balancing school and work and school comes first" (which was true--summer session is BRUTAL!), she understood. I went from part-time to PRN and then quietly fell off the schedule. I think I was there maybe 3 months. I put them on my resume because I knew I hadn't burned any bridges. I easily got hired a few months later at a children's hospital.

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2,557 Visitors; 80 Posts

I'm in the same situation, I got a CNA job in Sept when nursing school started again. It took a while to get this kind of job around here, so I don't want to leave. I too am working for the experience [i don't necessarily need the money]... needless to say, I don't really like how I'm being treated (I know every job's like that!) and also the drive's kinda long. But, I found out LTC is not for me. Nursing school is tough, (being a CNA is tough too) and its getting harder, that is priority over this LTC job (at least for me) . I wouldn't want to burn bridges but, let them know your situation I'm sure they would understand. HC workers know how hard nursing school is many dont even recommend working while attending school.,... I'm worried too. :facepalm:

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ctmed has 4 years experience and works as a CNA.

7,020 Visitors; 316 Posts

As long as you can pay the bills, no. You can always claim on an interview that the end of nursing school was hard and the job was affecting your studies. That kind of gap in employment is 100 percent understandable. I have known about two or three that did this and it did not affect them.

I hear you on LTC. Unless you are in the therapy department (OT/PT/ST) or have a desk job (HR, sales, social work) , the job is brutal for all levels of nurse. Moreso if you are the low man on the totem pole.

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357 Visitors; 1 Post

I'm having a problem slightly similar. I'm currently a CNA taking pre-req's to get into the nursing program. So my plate is pretty full. In between tests, I'm writing essays and studying for my admission test. I just got a job at a nursing home last week and by the 3rd day, I still have no clue where everything is and who needs what done or who is who or what I really need to do ultimately. I wasn't shown a real routine, or given real instructions. The women are really catty there too. And the owner has a very unprofessional attitude (she is so rude on the phone!). They gave me the hardest time about not working Friday-Sunday and instead just working Sat-Sun. When I told the owner right off the bat I didn't think I'd be able to, but she was too lazy to go change the schedule then. I want to leave, I've only worked there 3 days and I'm already miserable. Is it possible to quit without screwing up my future employment elsewhere? Does anyone know? I'll never return to this place, and it's a small family run nursing home, so I don't think I have to worry about them being a big chain and ruining chances with their branches or anything. I'm just a little afraid of it following me if I just quit without putting in 2 weeks notice. (I would put in 2 weeks, but the owner is already ****** at me for changing schedules, I DO NOT want to go back in there).

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience.

1 Article; 55,377 Visitors; 2,225 Posts

I would definitely quit. Gas is expensive, and not being compensated for ALL your time on duty is just wrong. I would look into getting a hospital gig.

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