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Lead Clinical Nurse is Dealing with a Negative Nelly, HELP!

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While venting is normal, the nursing station is not the place for it. Read on to see Nurse Beth's tips on how to handle a Negative Nelly.

by Nurse Beth Nurse Beth, MSN (Columnist)

Specializes in Med Surg, Tele, ICU, Ortho. Has 30 years experience.

Do you have a Negative Nelly on your floor?

Lead Clinical Nurse is Dealing with a Negative Nelly, HELP!

Hello Nurse Beth,

I need advice on how to engage a nurse who is frequently complaining about staffing. I am now entering my fourth month as a Lead Clinical Nurse on the chemical dependency unit of a freestanding, acute care psychiatric hospital. Our maximum census is 14, and, due to the brief nature of patient stays, we have constant activity. It is normal for 3 discharges and 3 admits to take place in a day.

Because of this, we have a split shift (1100-1930) admission nurse and mental health aid (MHA). While we cannot prevent admissions from occurring after the admit nurse leaves for the day, she does handle at least 50% of all admissions each calendar day. Also of note, we are one of two open units. We will not accept a patient who is actively suicidal, homicidal, self harming, assaultive, or psychotic. Patients with such severe conditions require the care of a locked unit, which is staffed with additional MHAs to manage the milieu and quickly respond to behavioral changes.

The RN who frequently complains about staffing has been with the hospital for 14 years, and I believe has worked on the detox unit the same duration. She is a weekend only nurse. I learned from my manager she receives a premium wage per her contract for working every weekend. When I accepted this leadership role, I was warned my staff are unhappy. I have successfully developed a mutually respectful rapport with each of my staff (7 in total), except this nurse. I have listened to her complaints about staffing. She uses key buzz phrases like "high acuity", "safe staffing", and "patient safety". "

However, when I ask her to explain how patients were unsafe and how having an additional person on the unit would prevent the non-existent safety event from happening, she is unable to provide an example. She uses the way a locked unit, with the same potential capacity, is staffed as her comparison. This is apples to oranges, and she does not see this. It has been brought to my attention that she is freely sharing her negativity in the nursing station when I am not scheduled. We did have a conversation to the effect of bringing awareness to the behavior, setting the expectation that the nursing station is a place of work and we need to support each other by creating a safe place to work.

I acknowledged venting is normal, though the nursing station is not the place. By choice, and to reduce costs of child care, I work 3 of 4 weekend shifts per pay period. I do not feel understaffed. We ARE busy, and there are shifts where I know I have definitely earned my paycheck, but I do not share her frustration. On the occasion when I feel we will need additional support, the house supervisor is able to send either an RN or MHA as requested 90% of the time. Our staffing grid is for 12-14 patients is 4.0 staff for an eight hour shift (either 4 licensed, or 3.5 licensed and 0.5 unlicensed when we have split shift staff). We are in California where the nurse to patient ratio for inpatient psychiatric care is 1:6. As charge, I take 1-3 patients plus an admission (at least twice weekly).

We are not required at this time to facilitate any nursing education groups on my shift, though I would very much like to improve our evening programming by eventually adding one such group after dinner. I need guidance on how to cut out the negativity, and help her to see we are actually in pretty good shape overall. Either that, or how to document unprofessional behaviors and misconduct so that we can start an official disciplinary process. Thank you SO VERY MUCH!"

Dear Needs Guidance,

Congrats on your new role and you seem to be doing a great job. You have a good working relationship with your team, and an excellent understanding of staffing requirements. 

This one nurse is a thorn in your side and you are wise to seek a solution. Often as a new leader, one or more staff members challenge and undermine you. You are doing well not to avoid the conflict, because you will be seen as a weak leader if you ignore her. Trust me, all of your staff is watching the dynamic between you and this nurse. Actually, they are watching you to see if you will establish your authority. This is your first major test.

Your current strategy is defensive and striving to get her to see the reasonableness of your argument but that will not work. Forget the arguments and debates over staffing.

The issue is not staffing, the issue is insubordination.

She has an emotional need to be seen as smarter than you. Her strategy is to bond others with her...against you. She needs to be seen as intellectually superior, or perhaps the Champion of Nurses' Rights, and she knows that her fellow staff nurses are not going to critically question her sweeping declarations of "high acuity", "safe staffing", and "patient safety". 

It's easy to undermine. It takes courage to lead.

You have heard her feedback and taken it under consideration. You have been collegial and respectful. You have had a verbal counseling with her but there were no teeth to the conversation, and she has not changed her behavior. In other words, you listened, you asked her nicely and she refused to change. She may even have felt that she prevailed.

It is time for a performance improvement plan (PIP).

The PIP will be documented and will reference the previous verbal counseling to show progressive discipline. Failure to meet performance expectations will be grounds for further progressive discipline. Be clear on the expectations.

You will listen to any constructive, measurable and positive solutions but the negativity will stop immediately. Negativity affects staff and ultimately erodes patient safety. It is your job to ensure a safe workplace and uphold professional behavior.

Make an appointment with her ahead of time rather than catching her on the fly. This sets the tone that this is serious. The conversation will be about her behavior and performance expectations. Do not by any means engage in a discussion on staffing. That is her trying to deflect the conversation. Be prepared to re-direct the conversation.

Her: "The staffing is unsafe and patient safety is at risk"

You: "We are here today to discuss your performance. It's come to my attention that you are expressing negative concerns at the nurses station. It is unprofessional and must stop immediately".

note: when a manager uses the phrase "it's come to my attention" employees may demand to know "who said what". This is a move intended to put you on the offense. Do not let it steer you off course, and do not give names. It is OK for managers to evaluate the source and give credence to reliable employees. As a manager, once I hear the same complaint from 2 or more credible sources....I knew there was a valid problem.

You: "We are here to talk about your performance"

Tell her you will meet with her in 2 weeks to touch base regarding her behavior. A common rookie mistake is to have an initial follow-up with an employee, the employee grudgingly improves, and the manager (with relief) does not follow up. The employee shows some initial improvement because their job is at stake, but soon relaxes and falls back into previous behavior.

You must keep a close eye on her performance. She will either improve and sustain improvement...or she will not.

Understand that she may leave, and it might not be a bad thing at all. She basically has one of 2 choices- change her behavior, or decide that she is far too unhappy to work in this unit.

This will be a good learning experience for you, and increase your leadership skills. Loop your supervisor and HR in and follow their directives.

Best wishes,

Nurse Beth

Hi! Nice to meet you! I love helping new nurses in all my various roles. I work in a hospital in Staff Development, and am a blogger and author.

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35 Comment(s)

Words Matter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatric Mental Health, Addiction, RN-BC, CARN. Has 6 years experience.

Thank you Nurse Beth! I’ll let you know how the conversation goes, and will be certain to keep the focus on her performance. Sounds to me like you have rumbled with this type of employee. The good news is my manager completely supports my efforts, has faith in my abilities, and is available for guidance. 

Nurse Beth, MSN

Specializes in Med Surg, Tele, ICU, Ortho. Has 30 years experience.

6 hours ago, 760marie said:

Thank you Nurse Beth! I’ll let you know how the conversation goes, and will be certain to keep the focus on her performance. Sounds to me like you have rumbled with this type of employee. The good news is my manager completely supports my efforts, has faith in my abilities, and is available for guidance. 

You are so welcome. You are so fortunate to have a supportive manager and I'm sure she knows she is fortunate as well to have you.

Another tactic with a Negative Nelly is finding a way to channel her negativity by giving her responsibility. For example, making her a lead or chair in a unit-based council or ad hoc performance improvement group. This makes her part of the solution, not just the problem. She could be charged with finding ways to improve within set boundaries, such as budget and ratios.

Some employees respond very well and rise to the challenge.

Either way, I'm excited for your growth and development in your new role.

WADR, I will partially agree and partially disagree.

I do not think this poster has tried to have a real conversation with this employee (it isn't mentioned here, anyway).

I think you (@760marie) would be wise to take one more step. (Again, with all due respect) your effort to engage was not an effort to engage. It was an effort to challenge her and call her bluff. Might as well pour gasoline on a fire.

I think this is an important distinction because it isn't uncommon for people who don't have a better method (than to "complain") to actually have something legit that is anchoring their unhelpful pattern.

Your inquiry is very well-written and you sound like you are doing great in your role. Don't make the same mistake that innumerable so-called nursing leaders have made before you by finalizing your opinion and making your labels so that you avoid the inconvenience of having to understand the real deal.

Let's be fair here, there's no doubt that the situation you describe with this employee's actions is problematic, not helpful and overall unacceptable. But it is also unacceptable for nursing leaders to always avoid hearing what might be going on (which would be taking the risk that it's something legit you'll feel compelled to handle/improve) and instead choosing to engage on a superficial (and also rather juvenile) level by challenging someone/calling their bluff instead of hearing their concern.

I think you need to have a meeting and find out what this employee is concerned/dissatisfied with. It might involve having to explain the apples/oranges specifics again. After you have done that, say something like, "I think you understand these these differences in how we are set up (the apples vs. oranges)....so that makes me wonder if there is something else....or other workplace issues that are bothering you...." and see where it goes. Don't be afraid to let her know, "You are a valuable employee and I'll be honest...I'd love to have your support...."

Please consider. There's nothing to lose.

Edited by JKL33

On 10/3/2020 at 12:17 PM, Nurse Beth said:

She has an emotional need to be seen as smarter than you. Her strategy is to bond others with her...against you. She needs to be seen as intellectually superior, or perhaps the Champion of Nurses' Rights, and she knows that her fellow staff nurses are not going to critically question her sweeping declarations of "high acuity", "safe staffing", and "patient safety". 

I forgot to add what it is that I agree with. I agree there's a good chance ^ this is true. I also agree with the PIP if the employee is not going to engage even after being given a bona fide, genuine opportunity to reconsider.

The convo I am suggesting is "going high" (when someone else goes low). It's the high road. It's confirming a suspicion before acting on it. There are a lot of people (maybe most, including leaders) who are not good at reading others and their psychoanalyzing of others is often just their own thoughts about themselves and they judge others right through their own lens. That's why it is important to confirm.

Secondly, failing to use caution in moving forward with discipline could very well backfire. You were told the staff was unhappy before you even arrived. It's possible there was this one RN who has been stirring the pot all along, but it's also possible that there are problems and the others are simply playing it more wisely with their new leader than this one RN is, or are choosing to be "nice" to you in hopes that things will change. If they see that you're someone like all the others who is just going to pick off dissenters....it might not look like the positive move you think it is.

Food for thought, I hope.

I agree that if she is indeed incorrigible then work on getting her out ASAP.

Words Matter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatric Mental Health, Addiction, RN-BC, CARN. Has 6 years experience.

On 10/5/2020 at 7:49 AM, Nurse Beth said:

Another tactic with a Negative Nelly is finding a way to channel her negativity by giving her responsibility. For example, making her a lead or chair in a unit-based council or ad hoc performance improvement group. This makes her part of the solution, not just the problem. She could be charged with finding ways to improve within set boundaries, such as budget and ratios

I'll keep trying on this effort. I have faith people will rise to the occasion. So far, recommendations I have made have been shot down by her, "I did that before, and nothing came of it". I encouraged her to try again. I have even coached her on the type of data she can document to support her effort for another FTE. We must have the data to back up any proposed changes and requests. I invite her to our monthly UPC which meets through Microsoft Teams, and request input on the agenda with an invitation to be part of the conversation. Currently, her personal annual goal is to attend a seminar on nursing management/interventions for the anxious patient, and I suggested I could request admin hours from the manager for her to prepare a brief presentation for her peers during UPC to apply interventions with our detox patients. All annual reviews are to be done a month early this year, so I hope the seminar is prior to her review. I would love to know her excited about the material she was exposed to in the seminar. BTW - no next level conversation yet. She was on PTO, then worked the following weekend when I directly observed  two instances of misconduct and defiance while she was charge RN and I was on admin. Per my manager's recommendation, I have reached out to HR for guidance on appropriate documentation leading up to and throughout the disciplinary process, if this is the necessary path. Everything must be just right, so we follow all union agreements and the law. I took this role because I was excited about the ways we could improve our patient engagement, care and programming. This whole experience with this nurse has been too much reality...

Words Matter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatric Mental Health, Addiction, RN-BC, CARN. Has 6 years experience.

On 10/11/2020 at 6:57 PM, JKL33 said:

Don't make the same mistake that innumerable so-called nursing leaders have made before you by finalizing your opinion and making your labels so that you avoid the inconvenience of having to understand the real deal.

 Let's be fair here, there's no doubt that the situation you describe with this employee's actions is problematic, not helpful and overall unacceptable. But it is also unacceptable for nursing leaders to always avoid hearing what might be going on (which would be taking the risk that it's something legit you'll feel compelled to handle/improve) and instead choosing to engage on a superficial (and also rather juvenile) level by challenging someone/calling their bluff instead of hearing their concern.

You are absolutely right. And we have had several 1:1 conversations at her request which end with her sending a text or email stating she appreciates feeling heard and supported. I want her to succeed and feel she's done good for at least one patient during each shift.

During the short time with my new team we have gained a person who is dedicated to patient rounds (in behavioral health, because the patients are engaged in milieu therapy and have varying types of safety risk factors, we must document each patient's location and affect/behavior Q30 minutes), and fast tracked RN's ability to assess an intoxicated pt at intake rather than waiting until they arrive on the unit, which will lead to a reduction in immediate ED transfers for medical clearance, reduction in Code Greens responding to belligerent patients, and hopefully decreased AMA's < 12-24 hours. RNs used to do the rounding until a few months ago. 

I like your suggested scripting in the last major paragraph of the referenced post. I am going to borrow that. 

Nurse Beth, MSN

Specializes in Med Surg, Tele, ICU, Ortho. Has 30 years experience.

5 hours ago, 760marie said:

 This whole experience with this nurse has been too much reality...

The reality is that one bad employee takes up 80% of your time, diverting your energies from your deserving, high-performing employees. I'm sure that leaders before you chose to ignore the behavior, using avoidance as their conflict management style.

But you are dealing with it. Trust me, this is all worth it in terms of your growth, your staff, and mostly, the patients you advocate for. Stay the course, it will be resolved one way or another. 

Remember, this employee is choosing her own outcome.

I love all the initiatives you are implementing! We need more leaders like you.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

I will add in a suggested book - its not very long and it is VERY enlightening. It's revolutionized how I react and interact in the work place, both in terms of coaching others and in terms of caring for my own interpretations of challenging things at work.

No Ego by Cy Wakeman

Here is a link to her keynote speech at the Magnet conference in 2018

 

 

9 hours ago, Nurse SMS said:

Here is a link to her keynote speech at the Magnet conference in 2018

Anyone just want to have an all-out discussion with me? 😬

I don't get what I'm not getting.

I've made it through 8 minutes of the above address and I can't help myself, this kind of stuff makes my stomach turn.

I've had an experience not unlike what she is talking about (in principle) in these first minutes of this speech and felt absolutely patronized by a similarly-enthusiastic non-nurse [in my scenario helpful people had reorganized our entire department to "streamline things" and it ended up with a piece of critical equipment not being at hand when I needed it a critical situation].

So here I am watching this address (above) and waiting for what wonderful way this speaker is going to handle this upset pre-op nurse and....

.....

SAME.

??

I'll try to keep watching and I am trying to have an open mind but this stuff makes me feel almost insane. Like I live on another planet or that the workplace has become some sort of alternate reality where a few people are supposed to constantly find their new best selves--always for the benefit of others, and always in order to facilitate what others want to do.

Anyone want to bite? I feel like talking it out...LOL

I'm up to 28:00 and dying to understand the appeal.

Rules for thee but not for me...

The part I'm on now is literally about how others are to behave in an ideal manner despite things not being ideal. That would be decent if it were actually about people and their personal well-being. But it isn't. The reason people need to be encouraged and empowered to respond in her ideal way is so that some other people can avoid ideal behavior with complete impunity, since, no matter WHAT happens, they are only required to do the exact thing she is disparaging, which is pointing out what others should be doing about the not-ideal thing.

She completely patronized the nurse who was humiliated at the bedside related to the hospital's processes.

I'm sorry @Nurse SMS, she is utterly lacking in humility and too smug for my taste. So far she has told a nurse "BREATHE....you need oxygen" (hardy har har) and now compared her MO to dealing with a 2-year old.

She is wrong and part of the problem.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

On 10/16/2020 at 11:30 AM, JKL33 said:

I'm up to 28:00 and dying to understand the appeal.

Rules for thee but not for me...

The part I'm on now is literally about how others are to behave in an ideal manner despite things not being ideal. That would be decent if it were actually about people and their personal well-being. But it isn't. The reason people need to be encouraged and empowered to respond in her ideal way is so that some other people can avoid ideal behavior with complete impunity, since, no matter WHAT happens, they are only required to do the exact thing she is disparaging, which is pointing out what others should be doing about the not-ideal thing.

She completely patronized the nurse who was humiliated at the bedside related to the hospital's processes.

I'm sorry @Nurse SMS, she is utterly lacking in humility and too smug for my taste. So far she has told a nurse "BREATHE....you need oxygen" (hardy har har) and now compared her MO to dealing with a 2-year old.

She is wrong and part of the problem.

Interesting viewpoint. I have found applying her thought process to my own emotional responses to be extremely useful and literally has catapulted my career.

1 hour ago, Nurse SMS said:

Interesting viewpoint. I have found applying her thought process to my own emotional responses to be extremely useful and literally has catapulted my career.

I'm glad your career has catapulted and I do think it's great if you were able to receive and apply something she said in a useful way. 🙂

There might be a sliver of what she says that I do believe, although as far as I can tell I apply it completely differently. For example, I think it's good to concern myself with being and doing my best despite what other people do. I think it's best to positively and proactively decide what I'm  going to do instead of simply reacting to what you have (or have not) done. It's just that the other side of it is that, in doing so, I do not and will not put myself in the emotional position that it is my duty to make good on the actions of another entity no matter what they may be.

I also don't believe that anyone gets to act with impunity and then turn around and demand what others' emotional responses should be. I see it more as "You had your turn to decide how to invest and apply yourself in this situation. Now it's my turn." So if you were the manager who said "suck it up" instead of staffing the unit properly, I will still be there and (because it is best for the patient and for me) I will still do my absolute best to take good care of the patients for which I am responsible. But when it takes me longer to answer a call light, I will not be telling the patient your preferred scripting such as, "I have the time...". Maybe lying to people to cover up someone else's choices doesn't make me feel whole and doesn't work toward the end of me doing my best. So I won't do it. Maybe, in order to respond to other entity's choices, I need to relieve myself from some of the extraneous preferred duties of the other entity. So, I will.

I will not be doing things angrily, sarcastically and spitefully, either.  It's just that I believe the other entity has lost their right to dictate how I will feel and suggest what my "best self" actions (in response to something I don't control) should look like. 

Her whole schtick is based in gas-lighting. It requires others to believe that it's just them and things simply aren't that bad. I'm not misunderstanding her, she gives the very example right off the bat: The patient is really close to being ready for surgery and is sitting in pre-op with a wrong chart. Ms. Wakeman's ideas require that the nurse not feel the *natural feelings of seriously frightening near misses*, and instead must BREATHE and then get right back in there like a champ and make sure the patient isn't freaked out [because *my* livelihood (or this business) depends upon you doing that!]

The best manager I ever had did teach us that we choose how we will respond to things around us; that things around us did not force us to respond a certain way. It took me a while to think through that and I ultimately agreed with her and it changed my life. **BUT** - - she also was not suggesting what one's chosen response would look like, just that however one responded, it should be understood that the response was a choice.

I do accept that idea.

Edited by JKL33

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

25 minutes ago, JKL33 said:

I'm glad your career has catapulted and I do think it's great if you were able to receive and apply something she said in a useful way. 🙂

There might be a sliver of what she says that I do believe, although as far as I can tell I apply it completely differently. For example, I think it's good to concern myself with being and doing my best despite what other people do. I think it's best to positively and proactively decide what I'm  going to do instead of simply reacting to what you have (or have not) done. It's just that the other side of it is that, in doing so, I do not and will not put myself in the emotional position that it is my duty to make good on the actions of another entity no matter what they may be.

I also don't believe that anyone gets to act with impunity and then turn around and demand what others' emotional responses should be. I see it more as "You had your turn to decide how to invest and apply yourself in this situation. Now it's my turn." So if you were the manager who said "suck it up" instead of staffing the unit properly, I will still be there and (because it is best for the patient and for me) I will still do my absolute best to take good care of the patients for which I am responsible. But when it takes me longer to answer a call light, I will not be telling the patient your preferred scripting such as, "I have the time...". Maybe lying to people to cover up someone else's choices doesn't make me feel whole and doesn't work toward the end of me doing my best. So I won't do it. Maybe, in order to respond to other entity's choices, I need to relieve myself from some of the extraneous preferred duties of the other entity. So, I will.

I will not be doing things angrily, sarcastically and spitefully, either.  It's just that I believe the other entity has lost their right to dictate how I will feel and suggest what my "best self" actions (in response to something I don't control) should look like. 

Her whole schtick is based in gas-lighting. It requires others to believe that it's just them and things simply aren't that bad. I'm not misunderstanding her, she gives the very example right off the bat: The patient is really close to being ready for surgery and is sitting in pre-op with a wrong chart. Ms. Wakeman's ideas require that the nurse not feel the *natural feelings of seriously frightening near misses*, and instead must BREATHE and then get right back in there like a champ and make sure the patient isn't freaked out [because *my* livelihood (or this business) depends upon you doing that!]

The best manager I ever had did teach us that we choose how we will respond to things around us; that things around us did not force us to respond a certain way. It took me a while to think through that and I ultimately agreed with her and it changed my life. **BUT** - - she also was not suggesting what one's chosen response would look like, just that however one responded, it should be understood that the response was a choice.

I do accept that idea.

I actually disagree strongly with your interpretation of the bolded portion above. I interpret that far more as "Yes, we are all freaked out that near misses happen, but reassuring the patient is the most important thing we can do right now". Freak outs and digging for root causes happens much more objectively and logically when the emotional part of it has been nixed. Overly emotional, "heads must roll" tactics at work, in my mind, are unproductive, unprofessional and absolutely not useful. I interpreted this as helping people get past their knee-jerk emotional reactions to a place where logic and purpose can take over.

3 minutes ago, Nurse SMS said:

I actually disagree strongly with your interpretation of the bolded portion above. I interpret that far more as "Yes, we are all freaked out that near misses happen, but reassuring the patient is the most important thing we can do right now".

I agree that a reactionary calling for heads to roll in a hotheaded manner is not productive.

I'm not sure I agree that reassuring the patient (that, 'hey, it's cool, I know it seems completely freaky but actually our system is working!') is the most important thing. It might be to the hospital.

What if my absolute best is performing an actual nursing assessment (VERY LIKELY) rather than proving reassurance whether it is appropriate or not? And what if my assessment is that, despite my careful explanation of processes we have laid out, the patient is not reassured and prefers to return on a different day (which might even mean that they choose care elsewhere)?

Is that okay with Ms. Wakeman?

Because her spiel sounds a lot like it requires certain outcomes to be achieved.

Call the response less than ideal. Well, sure it's less than ideal--the whole situation is less than ideal. So why is she there mocking only one portion of it?

She doesn't like the finger-pointing (and I agree that's not good)--but she's also pointing a finger.

 

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

From a humanitarian standpoint, providing reassurance and explanations is the right thing to do. I usually love the things you post, but sometimes your view of leadership and management is highly skewed toward cynicism and outright hostility based on your personal experiences. I just don't see the presence of matrix outcomes the way that you are in this situation. I see a nurse being encouraged to get past her overly emotional reaction to go take care of a patient who has been frightened to death.

18 minutes ago, Nurse SMS said:

I actually disagree strongly with your interpretation of the bolded portion above.

Also: I believe my interpretation is correct because she doesn't work through this in an intelligent ("we're equal") way but rather in a way that utilizes mockery and (uh....fingerpointing) to make others feel that they have been silly.

 

1 minute ago, Nurse SMS said:

From a humanitarian standpoint, providing reassurance and explanations is the right thing to do. I usually love the things you post, but sometimes your view of leadership and management is highly skewed toward cynicism and outright hostility based on your personal experiences. I just don't see the presence of matrix outcomes the way that you are in this situation. I see a nurse being encouraged to get past her overly emotional reaction to go take care of a patient who has been frightened to death.

I was writing as you were and I believe my interpretation is correct.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

1 minute ago, JKL33 said:

Also: I believe my interpretation is correct because she doesn't work through this in an intelligent ("we're equal") way but rather in a way that utilizes mockery and (uh....fingerpointing) to make others feel that they have been silly.

 

That's so interesting to me. I don't see or feel that at all.