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Jobs.. What are these??

Nurses   (354 Views | 8 Replies)
by Sweetlb Sweetlb (New) New

43 Profile Views; 2 Posts

Hi New to nursing and I need some help.

What are those alphabets (F), (A) after med-surge mean in the picture?

And anybody knows if there's any chance that hospitals would hire you when you can work only on weekdays day shift...? 

I wonder how a couple who both are nurses schedule shifts, when one person has rotating shifts already and you have a child (day care only available from 6am to 6pm), you won't be able to work during non day care hours and days.....any advices will be greatly appreciated.

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kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis.

3,168 Posts; 30,383 Profile Views

Those A's and F's might be some code specific to the hiring company so maybe look deeper into the job website you are looking at for an job category explanation? Otherwise I have to say I have not a clue.

As for your question about hospitals hiring for weekdays, AM's only I'd say your  odds of finding a job like that are about zero. Hospitals just don't have AM only with no weekends required positions working on the floor.  Positions with that  kind of schedule might exist, but they won't be a regular nursing position and they won't be available to a new nurse. Competition for such jobs is usually fierce plus those jobs typically require quite a bit of relevant experience.

If you are truly needing a weekday AM's only  job limit your job search to employers that offer those hours such as clinics or schools and your odds will be much better. Keep in mind some clinics are open Saturdays.  Honestly about the only position I can think of off the top of my head that might be new nurse friendly and has those kinds of hours is school nursing. Maybe somebody else will have some other suggestions for you.

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5 Followers; 37,755 Posts; 104,642 Profile Views

You can set your own schedule in extended care home health. Flexible scheduling is one of the advantages that agencies advertise. However you should explore stories from nurses who work in this area of nursing and consider whether this flexibility is worth the potential to become ‘fixated’ in acquisition of skills, as so many complain about. Of course not all situations lead to being typecast, a person needs to be proactive about meeting their self identified career needs, as with any specialty.

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5 Followers; 37,755 Posts; 104,642 Profile Views

As to the A and F, perhaps Full Time (and thus benefited), and Ancillary, or something similar (part time or on call)?  Quick call to the office posting the openings should clear this up.

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience as a RN.

1 Follower; 4,300 Posts; 30,159 Profile Views

I know of a few nurse couples who used family/ grandparents for their primary childcare. 

Procedural nursing tends to be dayshift, but cases can run long and your leaving time can vary. 

With experience, per diem nursing gives the most flexibility. Of course, the hours are not guaranteed, wages are generally set, and there are no benefits. As a parent, per diem has worked well for me. 

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,652 Posts; 14,820 Profile Views

3 hours ago, kbrn2002 said:

  Honestly about the only position I can think of off the top of my head that might be new nurse friendly and has those kinds of hours is school nursing. Maybe somebody else will have some other suggestions for you.

Sorry, most public school districts require experience. (Many also require a minimum of BSN along with specialized classes pertinent to school nursing.)

While there are some states and private school with exceptions, it's not a good idea for a brand new nurse.

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mmc51264 has 8 years experience as a ADN, BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes.

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ya-most hospitals have rotating shifts and certain amount of weekends for at least a year. Only the veterans get weekday shifts only. I am a weekend option so I work weekends on purpose, but no nights. 

Many of the positions where you work 9-5 M-F no weekends/holidays are prime and go to experienced nurses. A lost of Dr offices are now hiring CMAs instead of RNs now. 

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kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis.

3,168 Posts; 30,383 Profile Views

20 hours ago, Jedrnurse said:

Sorry, most public school districts require experience. (Many also require a minimum of BSN along with specialized classes pertinent to school nursing.)

While there are some states and private school with exceptions, it's not a good idea for a brand new nurse.

WOW!!, I honestly had no idea. Maybe our local school districts are the odd one's out but all of the schools around here hire RN's as well as LPN's and are new grad friendly for hiring.  Of course that may be because in recent years they have greatly diminished  benefits that used to be very good while not raising pay very much. They pay LPN's and RN's at the same rate and that rate is pretty darn low compared to other nursing jobs in the region. As a result they are always looking  for nurses.

Edited by kbrn2002

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,652 Posts; 14,820 Profile Views

1 hour ago, kbrn2002 said:

WOW!, I honestly had no idea. Maybe our local school districts are the odd one's out but all of the schools around here hire RN's as well as LPN's and are new grad friendly for hiring.  Of course that may be because in recent years they have greatly diminished  benefits that used to be very good while not raising pay very much. They pay LPN's and RN's at the same rate and that rate is pretty darn low compared to other nursing jobs in the region. As a result they are always looking  for nurses.

In decent states/districts nurses are on the same contract as teachers, so they tend to make out a little better.

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