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IV spa/infusion center

Posted

Specializes in IBCLC, Postpartum, Med-Surg Tele. Has 6 years experience.

Have any of you worked in an Infusion center/ IV nutrition/ IV spa type setting.  I am thinking about trying it part time one shift a week.  I have a background in massage therapy, so working in an environment that has that feel and alternative, elective treatments doesn't ruffle my feathers as long as they are safe.  I love starting IVs and have plenty of experience, I like the laid back environment and the pay is great.  My biggest concern is I would be working mostly independently, the Nurse practitioner is the owner and overseas everything, but is not always readily available and I'm not sure about the liability aspect.  I'm not really even sure where to begin looking into this...there is not a contract for me to sign or anything to really read over, which has me wondering...would I be putting myself and my license potentially at risk?  Thoughts, experiences, resources?  TIA!

Redd.CCRN

Specializes in CTICU. Has 3 years experience.

I worked at an infusion clinic PRN for a while.  I never felt unsafe in that environment.  You don't have many medications to work with, and All of the medications you are administering are rather innocuous for the most part (zofran, toradol, B12 and other vitamins, O2).  Make sure you are comfortable in recognizing allergic reactions, and know the 4 medications you will be administering front and back.  Other wise, it's rather cushy.  Good pay, normal hours, mostly friendly consumers.  If you aren't at least 7/10 with IVs though don't even consider it if you are the only RN on property because many of the people that come into these places are vascularly challenged.

Edited by Redd.CCRN

mermer_rn, BSN

Specializes in IBCLC, Postpartum, Med-Surg Tele. Has 6 years experience.

15 minutes ago, Redd.CCRN said:

I worked at an infusion clinic PRN for a while.  I never felt image in the environment, after all you are following orders.  All of the medications you are administering will be rather innocuous for the most part (zofran, toradol, B12 and other vitamins, O2).  Make sure you are comfortable in recognizing allergic reactions, and know the 4 medications you will be administering front and back.  Other wise, it's rather cushy.  Good pay, normal hours, mostly friendly consumers.  If you aren't at least 7/10 with IVs though don't even consider it if you are the only RN on property because many of the people that come into these places are vascularly challenged.

Thank you, that's kind of what I was thinking...I'm not prescribing and they do not offer things like turmeric drips or apitherapy injections, etc.   I hope my IV skills are good...I've worked a lot of jobs where people do not have good veins (acute medical dialysis, oncology before port access).  I'm not perfect and it would be frustrating to feel like it's time to let another nurse try, but there isn't another nurse!  Something to think about!

LibraSunCNM, MSN

Specializes in OB. Has 10 years experience.

Curious, what type of "infusions" are we talking about?  Is it like those hangover services where you give banana bags?  A poster above mentioned Toradol?

Redd.CCRN

Specializes in CTICU. Has 3 years experience.

9 minutes ago, LibraSunCNM said:

Curious, what type of "infusions" are we talking about?  Is it like those hangover services where you give banana bags?  A poster above mentioned Toradol?

The facility I worked at used toradol, pepcid, zofran, and micro nutrients (vitamins\minerals) in minimal dosages mixed into 1000 mL LR bags.  No IV pushes. Everything is compatible.

OpinionatedCNA, CNA

Specializes in Certified Vampire and Part-time Nursing Student.

49 minutes ago, Undercat said:

What is an IV "spa"?

It's a money grab from rich people. Overstating health benefits for things that don't make a difference in health individuals or banana bags for hang-overs.

Redd.CCRN

Specializes in CTICU. Has 3 years experience.

6 minutes ago, OpinionatedCNA said:

It's a money grab from rich people. Overstating health benefits for things that don't make a difference in health individuals or banana bags for hang-overs.

To add to your answer, it's a facility they provides IV hydration and limited medication administration by client request off a menu rather than by provider suggestion.  It still requires a provider's prescription and an order, as well as a nurses prior health assessment before administering.

A large number of clients do seem to have more money than they know what to do with, and are asking for treatments with little knowledge of their efficacy or purpose.  But hey, if you wanna show off have at it.

And yet, it's still a ligitimate practice. It's especially helpful for clients with chronic migraines, absorbtion disorders (e.g. Roux-en-Y bypass), DI, endurance athletes.  Not everything is readily absorbed through the digestive system.  It's helpful to anyone that requires frequent hydration/micro nutrient replacement without a (sometimes) weekly visit to the doctor's office.  Which is realistically unattainable.

LibraSunCNM, MSN

Specializes in OB. Has 10 years experience.

Sounds like a sweet gig, I wish I were better at starting IVs! 😂

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Redd.CCRN - I like the "vascularly challenged" phrase.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

There is no way in Hades I would administer anything IV... at the patient's request. What is the regulatory body for this spa?

What is the work up required before these fluids and medications  are administered? I would be especially concerned administering IV Toradol.    

 You should be concerned about your liability... YOU are responsible for any of these meds you administer. Very concerning you do not even have a job description.

 

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

OP - would you even be able to obtain malpractice coverage from an insurer? I'd check that out!

Redd.CCRN

Specializes in CTICU. Has 3 years experience.

1 hour ago, Been there,done that said:

There is no way in Hades I would administer anything IV... at the patient's request. What is the regulatory body for this spa?

What is the work up required before these fluids and medications  are administered? I would be especially concerned administering IV Toradol.    

 You should be concerned about your liability... YOU are responsible for any of these meds you administer. Very concerning you do not even have a job description.

 

I can understand your concern.  It can sound strange for someone who is unfamiliar.  Let me try to ease your mind though.  There was always a licensed prescriber involved (MD, NP, PA) who met with each client and then wrote the orders if they felt it was appropriate. There is a health assessment equal to that you would receive in any ED, or urgent care.  In other words it's a private practice with a very limited service, so it falls under all of the same regulations any clinic would.  It's not like it's black market Ringers, haha.

That said, malpractice insurance is a must for anyone practicing nursing in any facility.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

8 hours ago, Redd.CCRN said:

I can understand your concern.  It can sound strange for someone who is unfamiliar.  Let me try to ease your mind though.  There was always a licensed prescriber involved (MD, NP, PA) who met with each client and then wrote the orders if they felt it was appropriate. There is a health assessment equal to that you would receive in any ED, or urgent care.  In other words it's a private practice with a very limited service, so it falls under all of the same regulations any clinic would.  It's not like it's black market Ringers, haha.

That said, malpractice insurance is a must for anyone practicing nursing in any facility.

Certainly, you have medical orders to administer. Again... the customer  is the one presenting and requesting specific  IV treatment.  This is not medical treatment, this is catering to the whims of people with money. I myself, would not perform an invasive procedure with several risks.

 I can see you have already decided to do this.

Best of luck.

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

20 hours ago, Redd.CCRN said:

I can understand your concern.  It can sound strange for someone who is unfamiliar.  Let me try to ease your mind though.  There was always a licensed prescriber involved (MD, NP, PA) who met with each client and then wrote the orders if they felt it was appropriate. There is a health assessment equal to that you would receive in any ED, or urgent care.  In other words it's a private practice with a very limited service, so it falls under all of the same regulations any clinic would.  It's not like it's black market Ringers, haha.

That said, malpractice insurance is a must for anyone practicing nursing in any facility.

I think you're referring to an infusion clinic which is completely different from an "IV Spa", aka "IV Lounge", "Medical Spa", "Rent-a-drip", etc.  

An Infusion clinic provides medically legitimate treatments, whereas IV lounges and the like are the modern equivalents of Snake Oil shops.  

The risk you run by working at one of these places varies by state, although lately the FBI has begun raiding these establishments and arresting staff (most commonly just the owner / grifter, but working at one while holding a nursing license only increases your risk of legal liability since it's easier to argue you should have been aware you were taking part in fraudulent practices.

No legitimate carrier offers malpractice insurance for those working in IV lounges, there are malpractice carriers specifically for these employees but they sound about as legit as the IV lounges themselves.  

My state's BON position is that you're essentially giving up your license by working at one of these places since you violating the terms of your license by exposing people to risks despite being aware (or at least should be aware) that these risks are not justified by any potential benefit.

LibraNurse27, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community Health, Med/Surg, ICU Stepdown. Has 7 years experience.

It sounds fun/chill, but I agree with above concerns. I'm not sure how thorough the provider evaluations are, and they most likely won't have pt's medical records or be able to order labs, not all pts are good historians, etc. for example if a pt has CHF and received a bunch of bags of IV fluids... not good.

Or giving toradol to a pt with kidney failure or hx of GI bleeds, etc. If people are coming for hangover treatments they may have substance abuse issues with alcohol and have more complex medical problems, risk for withdrawal, etc. Just worse case scenarios LOL I'm an anxious person. Probably not likely but don't put your license at risk!

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 12 years experience.

I saw someone go into Torsades with IV Zofran. Just sayin'. Hope there is a crash cart! 

Redd.CCRN

Specializes in CTICU. Has 3 years experience.

6 minutes ago, Pixie.RN said:

I saw someone go into Torsades with IV Zofran. Just sayin'. Hope there is a crash cart! 

IV medication administration can be incredibly risky.  Usually it's the ones that we least expect that tend to catch us by surprise.  It's a risk that we assume every shift  One that we protect our patients from through expertise and vigilence, and one that we project ourselves from through patient education and malpractice coverage.  It's part of what distinguishes RNs from other healthcare professionals.