Is it rude to leave work after Maternity Leave?

Posted

I am new to the organization, and went on maternity leave after 7 months. I am currently looking for a job closer to my home esp with a new baby. My current job is 1 hour or longer from my home. 
 

Need advice please.🙁 I feel bad leaving since my bosses and co-workers are nice, but same time I am thinking about my set-up with my newborn🙁 I appreciate any input.

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience.

Congratulations on the new baby! 
I would not feel bad about leaving. Your family, especially a new baby, should come first before any job/admin that (more than likely) does not care about you/your family. The only thing I would say is to make sure you don’t burn any bridges on your way out. 
I think a good way to weigh the pros and cons is to think..will this matter 10 years from now.. If you give up precious time with your baby now you will never get it back. 
Good luck!

On 11/23/2021 at 7:51 PM, Daisy4RN said:

The only thing I would say is to make sure you don’t burn any bridges on your way out. 

While I don’t disagree at all that the OP’s baby must come first there is no possible way to not burn bridges by doing this. On maternity leave after only 7 months on the job and not going back is bound to leave a bad taste in her co-workers’ mouths. We had it happen to us. Colleague had a baby and was off all Summer. It affected vacations (only an 8 person staff) and we worked a lot of extra to cover for her. Two weeks before she was supposed to come back she put in her 2 weeks notice (didn’t want to lose her leave pay). A couple of years later she wanted to come back. Don’t think we forgot about what she did to us. 

That being said, when we decide to have children sometimes we have to make uncomfortable decisions that may burn us in the behind but priorities are priorities. Also, commuting for an hour or more one way is almost always a bad idea. 

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 24 years experience.

You have to do what is best for your family. But like the above post highlights, there are bound to be some bad feelings as  you leave.

In the end, you have your priorities. Do what works for you but don't plan on working in that unit anymore.

Congratulations and good luck.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

On 11/23/2021 at 8:11 PM, Wuzzie said:

While I don’t disagree at all that the OP’s baby must come first there is no possible way to not burn bridges by doing this. On maternity leave after only 7 months on the job and not going back is bound to leave a bad taste in her co-workers’ mouths. We had it happen to us. Colleague had a baby and was off all Summer. It affected vacations (only an 8 person staff) and we worked a lot of extra to cover for her. Two weeks before she was supposed to come back she put in her 2 weeks notice (didn’t want to lose her leave pay). A couple of years later she wanted to come back. Don’t think we forgot about what she did to us. 

Some people go out on "leave" damn well knowing that they're planning on not coming back. That's lying. (Can't tell from what the OP wrote if that's the case- I'm describing work situations I've seen.)

Give your notice and free up the position so the hiring process can begin...

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience.

On 11/23/2021 at 8:27 PM, SmilingBluEyes said:

You have to do what is best for your family. But like the above post highlights, there are bound to be some bad feelings as  you leave.

In the end, you have your priorities. Do what works for you but don't plan on working in that unit anymore.

Congratulations and good luck.

Forget the unit.  I doubt that she will be able to work n any institution in that group.  It's just a harsh reality.

brandy1017, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

Do what is right for you!  Just remember to come back first and give two weeks notice or your employer can charge you for the cost of health insurance premiums retroactively while you were on leave.