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Is it possible for me to be a good nurse?

Nurses   (1,382 Views 16 Comments)
by Mimium Mimium (New Member) New Member

78 Visitors; 2 Posts

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4 Visitors; 1 Post

Give yourself a chance. You can try to observe what makes others fast and efficient on doing things in their clinicals. But if I may suggest you can try positive thinking ,coz I think  it reflects on what your doin and if your grades are good ...you can become good too in clinicals and ATI..

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Studnt4now has 5 years experience as a ASN and works as a Pediatric floor nurse.

421 Visitors; 4 Posts

You're going to doubt yourself until you pass the boards, and then it's typically 16 months for a new nurse to feel confident.

We have all been there, I always joke that nursing school was the worst best choice I ever made...lol, man it sucked. And it was the most competitive nonsense too- dude, we all made it into the program, work together....ugh.

Give yourself 2 years after boards...you're going to make mistakes, feel inadequate, question the career choice, and panic about most everything....breath, we have all been there! *hug* 

Much like you, standardized tests killed me...I took every question on the boards. EVER. DAMN. QUESTION. 5 hrs....I was DEFEATED. I passed, and I've been playing nurse for a little over 5 yrs and love it! However, I think I love it because I'm in the speciality I am....no way could I do adults. 

Edited by Studnt4now

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NightNerd has 5 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN and works as a Med-psych nurse.

15,347 Visitors; 761 Posts

Nursing is a unique situation. On the one hand, our gut feelings can help us react quickly to a patient's decline, emphasize more readily with others, etc. On the other, when we're nervous or unsure, it compounds the stress we experience and negatively impacts our self-perception. It sounds like your feelings about yourself and your performance are getting the better of you, when in fact it sounds like you are a conscientious and capable student.

First, put on blinders to the other students. They are not you; you only have to make sure YOU become a nurse that you're proud to be. Don't give another thought to how anyone else is doing. Instead, ask yourself, "Am *I* comfortable with this concept or skill? What do *I* need to master this?" Identify where you are and what it will take for you to feel confident in a particular subject. Break it down; nursing is easier in small pieces. I promise everything will start fitting together.

I remember feeling like an absolute dimwit during all of my clinicals at some point - not to mention the anxiety of the first few months at any new job. Some of it is the inevitable learning curve, but I still create a lot of my own problems by being worried. We panic bunnies can still survive and thrive as nurses, lol, but we need to catch ourselves in the act and refocus on actual nursing. As long as you are humble about what you know and are eager to learn, you'll be all right. It takes time and experience to develop confidence, which it's surprisingly hard to get while in school. Your whole knowledge base will grow exponentially once you're in a job, and you WILL feel better about this. Hang in there!

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missmollie has 4 years experience as a ADN, BSN and works as a RN.

13,341 Visitors; 858 Posts

Sounds like you want internet people to validate what you're going through. 

No, you won't be a good nurse

Yes, you will be a good nurse.

What I say doesn't matter, it's all up to you.  Nursing school breaks you down, but not enough.  You'll have tougher days on the unit.  The choice comes down to your abilities and your desire to "be a good nurse".

You will have areas you're great at, you'll have areas your safe at, and you'll have areas you'll improved.  You've almost made it through nursing school.  You don't need our accolades to be better.  You need some faith in your abilities and the fact that you won't know everything when you hit the floor.  That's okay. 

Best of luck.  We've all felt this way before.

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