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Is medsurg a necessity for a new grad?

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Is it necessary to start off your career as an RN in medsurg, or can you start off in another unit if it is available for new grads? Are the skills knowledge gained in medsurg essential to working on other units/areas of nursing?

Thanks!

hey! i think that med/surg could benefit anyone, but it really depends. i work mother/baby and didn't do med/surg. i am a new grad working there. it is all i really want to do, so why do med/surg?

i say if your heart is elsewhere and you can get a new grad position there, go for it!

by the way, aloha! i graduated from kahuku high on the north shore of oahu!

Well, in my opinion, I really think that spending at least a few years in med/surg is beneficial. It gives you a solid background that you simply can't get otherwise. When I graduated as an LPN I went directly into OB/ nursery. Later worked in NBICU. But, down the road, I found it limiting when I wanted a change. So when I got my RN, made sure I went straight to med/surg. And, although that may not be exciting it was a decision I have never regretted.

I think med surg will give anyone beneficial skills needed in all units of nursing. I think it is great when people get internships in certain designations, but the hands on skills of med surg will make you more well rounded. You may not know now what it is you want to be doing 5, 10, 15 years down the road. I know there are people who have always stayed in the same units, but I believe in at least "testing the waters". If your hospital floats people (volunteers or not) don't limit yourself to only one specialty. Just my opinion, best wishes whatever you do. We need more nurses!`

Depends on what you want to do, but I say NO it isn't necessary. Med-surg is a specialty like any other as far as I am concerned and deserves that respect.

No offense, but if you do a year of med-surg, then 15 in another area like OB, you aren't going to remember those med-surg skills anyways. I had an OB nurse ask me what digoxin was as a student. She had done med-surg, it was just so long ago that she wasn't current in it anymore.

I graduated in June and did psych nursing at a state hospital. I'm finding that most nurses that work here tell me that a few years in med-surg is good, so I've decided that in addition to working this job PT, I am going to apply for a new grad internship in Med-Surg. Good idea?

I graduated in June and did psych nursing at a state hospital. I'm finding that most nurses that work here tell me that a few years in med-surg is good, so I've decided that in addition to working this job PT, I am going to apply for a new grad internship in Med-Surg. Good idea?

I went into the ICU as a new grad; and it's been two years. I don't regret going straight into this specialty. I love what I do; and I've learned sooo much! There have been a few times when I questioned my decision not to do med-surg first, but I don't think I would change a thing if I could go back in time. What's interesting about where I work is that it seems like most of the new grads do better in our ICU than those who come from the Med Surg floors. I don't know why this is. Many of our new grads jump at the chance to take a fresh trauma. I have recently precepted a nurse who came from the Med Surg floor who is so afraid to take a new trauma admission. She's terrified. I've been trying to encourage her to help other nurses who are getting new traumas to get used to all the chaos. Maybe it's because the Med Surg nurses, who have more experience as a nurse than the new grads, know what to be afraid of. I'm not really sure what it is. But I encourage all new grads to go into the specialty they're interested in. I don't think its necessary to do Med Surg first, though it would be an advantage to do so. No matter what you choose, you will most definitely learn your craft and you get what you put into it.

I went into the ICU as a new grad; and it's been two years. I don't regret going straight into this specialty. I love what I do; and I've learned sooo much! There have been a few times when I questioned my decision not to do med-surg first, but I don't think I would change a thing if I could go back in time. What's interesting about where I work is that it seems like most of the new grads do better in our ICU than those who come from the Med Surg floors. I don't know why this is. Many of our new grads jump at the chance to take a fresh trauma. I have recently precepted a nurse who came from the Med Surg floor who is so afraid to take a new trauma admission. She's terrified. I've been trying to encourage her to help other nurses who are getting new traumas to get used to all the chaos. Maybe it's because the Med Surg nurses, who have more experience as a nurse than the new grads, know what to be afraid of. I'm not really sure what it is. But I encourage all new grads to go into the specialty they're interested in. I don't think its necessary to do Med Surg first, though it would be an advantage to do so. No matter what you choose, you will most definitely learn your craft and you get what you put into it.

Maybe it's because the Med Surg nurses, who have more experience as a nurse than the new grads, know what to be afraid of.

I think that is part of it.

Maybe it's because the Med Surg nurses, who have more experience as a nurse than the new grads, know what to be afraid of.

I think that is part of it.

jenrninmi, MSN, RN

Specializes in L&D. Has 11 years experience.

I hope not, because I have no intention of working in a med/surg unit. It's L&D for me!

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