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Is this considered bullying?

Nurses   (7,218 Views 68 Comments)
by Ilovenursing3 Ilovenursing3 (New Member) New Member

351 Visitors; 38 Posts

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351 Visitors; 38 Posts

I have been in hospital and not realized I was taking a med they were giving me. I mean a med I had been on for a very long time. It's amazing what you forget when you are stuck in a bed. Just educate the patient when they state they didn't know they were taking it. And if they refuse, just document the refusal.

Thank you for your input. Much appreciated :)

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37 Visitors; 7 Posts

The great thing about learning from others is sometimes we see great examples of how NOT to behave. To me, this sounds like she's bullying the new NA, and probably others. Luckily, you see this and don't want to perpetuate this type of behavior. You sound like you're already a fantastic nurse and will be an exemplary role model for all whom you work with :)

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59 Likes; 3 Followers; 33,537 Visitors; 4,124 Posts

Thank you all SO much for taking the time to reply and give advice/input. I think we all have established I need to learn from it and move on. I am not sure if I would have to start a new thread or if I can even ask this kind of question, but I would really like to know what my fellow nurses would do in this situation

Okay, so I like to open my medications at the bedside. I like to open them one by one and tell them what it is. I was giving medications to one of my patients.(it was my first time taking care of this patient) The last medication I told him, he said verbatim "I didn't know I was taking that medication". I was shocked. I told him I'm not going to give him a medication he didn't feel comfortable taking. My preceptor told him the Prozac was for his stroke to help the healing process. I thought it was great she educated him, and I learned from that. BUT, I told her I was upset he didn't know what medications he was getting. It wasn't an attack on her. She said he has a brain injury so he probably didn't remember. Well, now that I typed that out it doesn't sound so bad. What would you all have done in that situation?

No need for shock. Do you really think patients always know all of their meds?

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JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Pediatric RN.

196 Likes; 1 Follower; 6,463 Visitors; 549 Posts

Thank you all SO much for taking the time to reply and give advice/input. I think we all have established I need to learn from it and move on. I am not sure if I would have to start a new thread or if I can even ask this kind of question, but I would really like to know what my fellow nurses would do in this situation

Okay, so I like to open my medications at the bedside. I like to open them one by one and tell them what it is. I was giving medications to one of my patients.(it was my first time taking care of this patient) The last medication I told him, he said verbatim "I didn't know I was taking that medication". I was shocked. I told him I'm not going to give him a medication he didn't feel comfortable taking. My preceptor told him the Prozac was for his stroke to help the healing process. I thought it was great she educated him, and I learned from that. BUT, I told her I was upset he didn't know what medications he was getting. It wasn't an attack on her. She said he has a brain injury so he probably didn't remember. Well, now that I typed that out it doesn't sound so bad. What would you all have done in that situation?

Just because he said he didn't know he was takin g amedication, does not mean that he wasn't comfortable taking the medication - that is a big leap to take. As others have mentioned, many patient's don't remember/realize what meds they are taking or not - think of how often things get changed, discontinued, recontinued, etc in the hospital. Educate them as your precptor appropriately did, and then go from there.

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351 Visitors; 38 Posts

The great thing about learning from others is sometimes we see great examples of how NOT to behave. To me, this sounds like she's bullying the new NA, and probably others. Luckily, you see this and don't want to perpetuate this type of behavior. You sound like you're already a fantastic nurse and will be an exemplary role model for all whom you work with :)

Thank you much appreciated :). She is knowledgeable, but my personal preference is to do my best to be happy :)

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caffeinatednurse has 3 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse (RN).

3,606 Visitors; 253 Posts

I like cristism, but I feel there is a certain way it should be said. She told me she will tell me "everything I'm doing wrong because that is what will make me a good nurse". I'm sorry if I'm wrong, but dealing with someone constantly putting me down I think would be a sign I should find a new job or maybe nursing isn't for me.

I don't know about you, but I would like be told when I'm doing something wrong, so that I have a chance to fix it. I certainly would not like to be lied to during orientation, which would inevitably set me up to fail when I come off of orientation. I think your preceptor is doing you a favor here, by telling you that she's going to be honest with you. She's not "putting you down" as you phrased it.

You're going to encounter a lot of people - patients, coworkers, bosses, in healthcare who are going to be blunt with you. It's best to adjust to that now rather than later. It doesn't mean that you need a new job or that nursing isn't for you. You just have a learning curve.

I would do my best to ignore the drama between your preceptor and the NA. You're new and you have no idea what kind of drama may have happened in the past, or may be occurring right now. As the new nurse, you want to be focused on your new job and responsibilities.

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351 Visitors; 38 Posts

I don't know about you, but I would like be told when I'm doing something wrong, so that I have a chance to fix it. I certainly would not like to be lied to during orientation, which would inevitably set me up to fail when I come off of orientation. I think your preceptor is doing you a favor here, by telling you that she's going to be honest with you. She's not "putting you down" as you phrased it.

You're going to encounter a lot of people - patients, coworkers, bosses, in healthcare who are going to be blunt with you. It's best to adjust to that now rather than later. It doesn't mean that you need a new job or that nursing isn't for you. You just have a learning curve.

I would do my best to ignore the drama between your preceptor and the NA. You're new and you have no idea what kind of drama may have happened in the past, or may be occurring right now. As the new nurse, you want to be focused on your new job and responsibilities.

Yes, you are correct. Its 100% to know what someone is doing wrong in nursing. I would always ask "Did I do everything okay or was there anything that could have been done better?" "What am I doing wrong and what are strengths?" I think a lot of it was my own perception. However, getting frustrated with me and saying things like "this is a very easy unit, you should be able to do all of it by now" My perception of someone getting frustrated because I ask a question, is essentially seeing my work as useless. I think I should have been more clear in my original post. I don't think she was bullying me personally. It was little things like getting a nursing intervention done on our patients and then not documenting on it and telling me I'm doing everything late. Everyone on here can think I have a bad attitude for saying things like that, but I would never blame an order being late on someone else because I didn't document on it. If she has stated she is going to document it, then maybe she should have. Or maybe, I should have followed up. I was used to working with the first aide-(the one that is friends with my preceptor was on vacation). The patients were bathed, fed and given anything they needed during the day by 9:30am. The first shift I worked with my preceptors friend the aide, (well, and this was my last shift) I came out of a patient's room who was dry in the morning when I checked her. When it came around to her 1200 meds, she must started to scoot down, so she needed a pull up and to be changed. I asked my preceptor to help with a pull up. She got frustrated I asked and then proceeded to tell me, it's my job to tell her when the patient needs to be changed. Of course it is, but I thought nursing aides change briefs(if needed) in the morning and gets vitals? If an aide hasn't been in a room for 4 hours because they are sitting down doing nothing, I mean is it my job to bathe patients when it's protocol on the unit for the nursing aides to get vitals and help with bathed and stuff? I was up running around, helping the patients do laundry, feeding them, meds, assessments, by 12pm. I don't mind doing everything, but just stuff like that if people are sitting around, it's so helpful if someone can help patient get tolietries so I can get things done faster. Or maybe I should be able to do everything and complaining. Anytime an aide warms up a patient's water, I say thank you so much. Little things help. Sounds petty? Probably, but it was constantly happening. I do think my preceptor was being disrespectful to the aide I originally met(the one that is so helpful) and that's what I meant by my original post. Maybe not bullying as that is thrown around a lot.(I know, I know I'm going to get ALOT of hate for my last few sentences about not being able to get things done on my own)

I worked hard for my nursing license and I'm going to find another job. I resigned as it wasn't healthy for me to be there. I want to practice my skills as maybe I'm not that good of a nurse as of right now-being able to have 8 patients and do it all in two weeks was to much for me personally. It wasn't safe. But, at the end of the day, I think everything happens for a reason. Yes, my attitude sucked and I could have done things differently, but the other employees who receive the nasty behavior from this nurse, finally had someone to stick up for them. (They thanked me for standing up to her)

In conclusion, it's very hard to know what someone is trying to convey through the internet. Kind of like texting, people sometimes can't tell the other persons tone. So I hope I didn't come off to mean or anything. I know I wrote this long message lol, but I think I have a lot to learn, but I would come in early in the morning to see if the night shift nurse and nursing aide needed any help to finish up the shift, always let my patients know to please let me know if they need anything even if its something small.I'm pointing that out because I got the vibe some people on this message board felt I have this crappy attitude and not a good RN. I also wanted to get it all out as I probably will try and close this post soon. People are sick of my whining I'm sure.

Thank you for your reply :). I just wanted to point some things out if you wanted to give advice back. I isolate myself so sometimes it's nice to hear from people even if it's on the internet :)

Edited by Ilovenursing3
Grammar

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351 Visitors; 38 Posts

I would be in a patient ls room well into changing them then have to speed up to finish or stop completely

The nurse's will just calmly be sorting meds and be right next to the residents room. I mean I know you have to pass out meds but is it really worth letting a resident fall -_-

No, it's not worth it at all for a patient to fall. I have always said that if I patient falls in my watch, then I failed. God I would be so angry if a patient fell on my shift. It's a lot of paperwork, which obviously I wouldn't mind doing that, but most importantly my preceptor told me don't ever document your name as who is at fault. I think she's right about that. Knowing me, I would put my name as the nurse on the floor at the time, but I'm not sure to even put anything. Again, I'm new so what she says is more than likely correct.

This is exactly what happened. My preceptor and the aide were closer to the patient than I was. The alarm went off, I left the med keys on the med cart and ran as fast as I could. I really would think herself and the aide would have helped, but it's my fault I left the keys on the cart. I was scolded about that, which I understand completly. (The med room is at the nursing station so patients don't have access to the nursing station unless someone isn't watching it)

I learned next time, grab the keys quickly and book it.

Yes, my preceptor DEF favors the aide that apparently thinks since she has been there for a very long time is invincible.

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351 Visitors; 38 Posts

Oh and correct me if I'm wrong but I sense a tinge of favoritism. between your preceptor, the aide that was pushed, and the aide that sat at the station while the alarm went off. Did your preceptor say anything to the aide at the station? If not her place, did anyone speak to the aide?

No, she didn't say anything. Just that (my preceptor and the aide) didn't need to get up as they figured I had it under control. Well, I guess I didn't.

You sound like a nursing aide that I would love to work with. I can tell you really care about the patients you care for.

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351 Visitors; 38 Posts

Lots of patients don't remember what they are taking, so no need to be shocked or upset. You educate him-what the med is for, why he is taking it, etc. If he refuses, you document that and let the physician know.

Yes, I apologize I didn't want to come across as it was my preceptors fault at all. I was shocked because it was my first time caring for this patient and I would never forgive myself for giving a med to a patient who didn't know what it was. So even if the patient gets the same meds everyday, I still open it at the beside and say what I am giving. I'm sure it annoys the heck out of the patients.

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232 Likes; 1 Follower; 13,025 Visitors; 1,360 Posts

Not effective mentorship or leadership. But no, not bullying.

She's bullying the aide if she brazenly pushes her. Based on the info given, she is not bullying OP.

Although OP feels like she is going to be next, which is understandable.

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Tboland88 has 1 years experience.

507 Visitors; 22 Posts

She should not be your preceptor. She is suppose to be guiding, you not exhibiting those traits.

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