Interviewing after Resignation

Posted

I resigned last week from a nursing home that I was working at for about 3 months due to staffing, management, and fear of losing my license had I stayed at this particular facility. So I'm starting to interview again and I wonder if I should include my first job which I resigned from? Or how should I explain my resignation?? Any comments or suggestions are welcomed!!!!

rzyzzy

rzyzzy

389 Posts

I resigned last week from a nursing home that I was working at for about 3 months due to staffing, management, and fear of losing my license had I stayed at this particular facility. So I'm starting to interview again and I wonder if I should include my first job which I resigned from? Or how should I explain my resignation?? Any comments or suggestions are welcomed!!!!

I'm surprised no one else has commented on this? It's a dirty little not-a-secret that many nursing homes are poorly managed and woefully understaffed & the nurse gets thrown under the bus whenever there's an issue. Our standards of care as nurses are much higher than the average nursing home administrator (who isn't a nurse). The unwritten rule when interviewing is not to throw your former employer under the bus. Even if they earned a trip under the bus. So you tactfully dodge the issue, but still claim that experience, because even bad experiences have value.

Something along the lines of.."I worked at xyz as a night-shift LPN. As part of that position, I cared for 30+ residents, passing medications, doing wound care, breathing treatments, etc. I *loved* working with the residents and meeting their families, but due to a change in management, over a few months, the new residents assigned to my care began having a higher acuity level than I could safely manage as a new-grad nurse. I expressed those concerns to my don, who was unresponsive, so I gave notice & resigned that position"

Other nurses will know the underlying meaning. I took the first LPN job I could find after I got my license, eager to learn & full of enthusiasm & energy. I quickly found that the only thing I could learn at that facility were bad habits. There are good facilities out there, but they're not the ones who need 19 nurses yesterday.

Good on you for getting out with your license intact & good luck in your search!

Edited by rzyzzy

littlelimabean01, LPN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Trach Care, Diabetes. Has 5 years experience. 69 Posts

Wow, you sound like the position I was in I had 4 peg tubes and 14 accu checks and 7 scheduled insulin shots that was included in my 6am med pass, as I work over night too. I found myself having to cut corners just to get my job done and I felt very crappy about it. I say certainly include it on your last job. Honestly most employers don't even check job references. If they do, you resigned and probably gave reasonable notice it doesn't have to be 2 weeks. The fact is you have experience and that is what employers are looking for mostly. A 30 patient load is insane, been there. It is too much it is a disservice to the patients and to yourself. If you find yourself in this situation again, interview while you are employed it is easier to get a job while employed also you will be more relaxed in the interview because essentially you are the "shopper" because you are just looking for a better opportunity to serve. Like I said I was in your situation before, and I kept my job as I shopped for something else and I turned down 3 jobs before I accepted the 4th offer. I wish you the best. Don't worry you will find a place where you belong and can benefit the people you set out to serve.

Mscoleman78

Mscoleman78

138 Posts

I'm surprised no one else has commented on this? It's a dirty little not-a-secret that many nursing homes are poorly managed and woefully understaffed & the nurse gets thrown under the bus whenever there's an issue. Our standards of care as nurses are much higher than the average nursing home administrator (who isn't a nurse). The unwritten rule when interviewing is not to throw your former employer under the bus. Even if they earned a trip under the bus. So you tactfully dodge the issue, but still claim that experience, because even bad experiences have value.

Something along the lines of.."I worked at xyz as a night-shift LPN. As part of that position, I cared for 30+ residents, passing medications, doing wound care, breathing treatments, etc. I *loved* working with the residents and meeting their families, but due to a change in management, over a few months, the new residents assigned to my care began having a higher acuity level than I could safely manage as a new-grad nurse. I expressed those concerns to my don, who was unresponsive, so I gave notice & resigned that position"

Other nurses will know the underlying meaning. I took the first LPN job I could find after I got my license, eager to learn & full of enthusiasm & energy. I quickly found that the only thing I could learn at that facility were bad habits. There are good facilities out there, but they're not the ones who need 19 nurses yesterday.

Good on you for getting out with your license intact & good luck in your search!

Thank you!!!!!

Mscoleman78

Mscoleman78

138 Posts

Wow, you sound like the position I was in I had 4 peg tubes and 14 accu checks and 7 scheduled insulin shots that was included in my 6am med pass, as I work over night too. I found myself having to cut corners just to get my job done and I felt very crappy about it. I say certainly include it on your last job. Honestly most employers don't even check job references. If they do, you resigned and probably gave reasonable notice it doesn't have to be 2 weeks. The fact is you have experience and that is what employers are looking for mostly. A 30 patient load is insane, been there. It is too much it is a disservice to the patients and to yourself. If you find yourself in this situation again, interview while you are employed it is easier to get a job while employed also you will be more relaxed in the interview because essentially you are the "shopper" because you are just looking for a better opportunity to serve. Like I said I was in your situation before, and I kept my job as I shopped for something else and I turned down 3 jobs before I accepted the 4th offer. I wish you the best. Don't worry you will find a place where you belong and can benefit the people you set out to serve.

Thank you!!!

jonnysangel777, LPN, LVN

Specializes in Psych/Addiction/School - with BA in Psych. Has 20 years experience. 25 Posts

I've listed every nursing job on my resume and when I put my reason for leaving when I have resigned from a not sooo good employer, I will put something like... Looking for more opportunities to become more efficient as a nurse

Emergent, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 29 years experience. 2 Articles; 4,040 Posts

I wouldn't mention anything about new management and less safe working conditions. Just say "I was ready for a change, wanting to broaden my horizons and knowledge base. I've heard great things about your organization and think I can be a positive part of your team, yada yada yada"