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rzyzzy

rzyzzy

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  1. rzyzzy

    How to handle patient’s threats

    “I’ll notify the doc of your concerns and get back with you “. Done. you can’t give what isn’t ordered and your algorithm / protocol obviously doesn’t allow what they’re asking for. no reason to tie yourself into knots over something that’s outside your control.
  2. rzyzzy

    Fact or Fiction?  Masking and CO2 Dangers

    Yeah, but no one is using “force” - you’re welcome to skip the mask, you’re just *not* welcome to skip the mask at Costco. If there are more than a handful of people who’ve actually gotten a ticket for refusing to wear a mask or leave a public establishment, I’ll eat my own shoe. cops don’t want to write tickets for it, some have openly said they won’t write tickets for it, and many governors have openly said no one is getting a ticket for it. So there’s no force being exerted here. On the flip side, there have been quite a few anti-maskers threatening those who call them out. I had to quit a job where “masks for everyone, all the time” became “masks for everyone, except the butt-heads who don’t wanna, even without a legit medical reason” - and this was inside a dialysis clinic - where everyone is compromised and the patients aren’t six feet apart. Later on, there was a government order requiring masks inside the facility, but that order came too late for me, and possibly for at least a couple patients who died of covid. the “personal choice” argument goes hand in hand with the “its not that bad unless you’re compromised” argument- which infers that only those at high risk “need” to mask up. That’s an insane argument simply because the compromised still need to buy gas and kitty litter and cheese, just like you - and there aren’t any “separate but equal” facilities for them.
  3. rzyzzy

    Misconceptions/truths about specialities

    Yech.. Having to do physical holds on two patients before you even finish getting report.. Doc, are you absolutely suuuuure we shouldn’t transfer out this chf patient with lungs so wet I can hear the bubbling from five feet away? psych is so easy..
  4. rzyzzy

    Fact or Fiction?  Masking and CO2 Dangers

    +1 you don’t need any “studies“ to know that your lung capacity is far below the volume of air trapped between your body and the mask. anyone medically incapable of wearing a mask belongs in a hospital, not a big box store.
  5. rzyzzy

    Question for Psych Nurses

    A shift isn’t yours forever - nights can be good for a new nurse because the med pass isn’t usually as overwhelming- on nights you’ll usually have less meds, and probably at least a little more time to research each one as you give it. The fact that there may be less patient interaction is a benefit, not a bug - you can probably spend a little more time getting the documentation (and follow up) right on the meds you do pass, plus - get comfortable with the computer systems, gadgets and gizmos that your specialty uses. nights often is where the chart audits happen - and when you’re filing and checking other nurse’s work, you’ll learn how not to make the same mistakes yourself. Plus, you might actually have a chance to look at the history and physicals & start making the jump from the classroom to connecting the dots in the real world. I wouldn’t assume that nights means no patient interaction either - people don’t tend to sleep very well in hospitals..
  6. rzyzzy

    Could the police learn something from nurses?

    Nope, you don’t get to pull that card. We absolutely *can* have a conversation about a “profession” that has gotten out of control, and when the problems are systemic and nationwide, the occupation gets to wear the tar and feathers they’ve earned. Arresting and roughing up journalists, roughing up white senior citizens, shooting people for sitting on their own porches, arresting over a hundred people on false felony charges (who were peacefully protesting).. the list goes on and on, in the past week.. that’s not “a few bad apples”, that’s a “profession” that has no respect for the people who pay for their fat salaries and cushy pensions. I’m not a “bigot” for pointing out the truth. All across the country, in any city of any size, you’ll see people peacefully protesting and cops dressed in black ready for war. The “rules” they make up themselves specifically allow for assaulting the people they’re charged with “protecting”, and there is no effective oversight. They can do better, and we deserve better. The American public hasn’t been stingy with the dollars for law enforcement. I can’t think of any occupation in the country that involves the amount of standing around in groups for hours on end, like modern “law enforcement”. Name any event in any city in the country and you’ll see lots of cops standing around, doing nothing productive.
  7. rzyzzy

    Help! Hospice RN under investigation for diversion

    The holes will be easier for an attorney to find than for you to find yourself. my board investigation experience was different, but similar - in that it was just an unsupported patient complaint. I think it took eight months to actually get to that interview with the investigator, at which point I wasn’t even asked any questions, the investigator told *me* that the complaint was bull, and that’s when I was told that the patient was a serial complainer that had made multiple false claims, tried to blackmail a CNA after sexually assaulting her, yadda yadda.. I could have buried myself if I had chatted with the board at the first opportunity without an attorney, or if I hadn’t had an attorney’s help in crafting my response to their written questions. The waiting is agonizing and terrifying if you’re actually innocent. And they didn’t provide me with any actual details of the complaint until they were dismissing it. I thought multiple times about just turning my license in and walking away - and I hadn’t actually done anything wrong.. I feel you, I been there, stay strong..
  8. rzyzzy

    Could the police learn something from nurses?

    Cops have an “us vs them” attitude. “As long as I go home safe”, and referring to the people they’re hired to protect as “civilians”.. They’re flying an alternate *flag* for chrissake! The terminology used is showing as a symptom of the disorder. By separating themselves from “us”, we’re not valued at the same value. There’s no need to reconcile or diffuse things with your neighbors and friends in the community because they’re “them”.. separate and unequal. The pot is completely spoiled, and it’s been poisoned so badly that it needs to be tossed out. For the first hundred years in this country, there weren’t any “police”.. so there IS a way to create a new pot that actually has real oversight and accountability. The idea that a couple cops could knock down a senior citizen in public, on camera, in daylight- then 52 of them would “resign” as “special response” officers *because there was a tiny bit of accountability* shows you the attitude that we’re dealing with. They’re out of control and must be stopped.
  9. rzyzzy

    Help! Hospice RN under investigation for diversion

    You’ve done the right thing by lawyering up.. The next part is probably the worst part though.. the waiting with a cloud over your head. In my state, complaints are “triaged” by the board, and cases that are immediate-jeopardy and easy-to-prove end up at the front of the line. There’s a “goal” that something like 80+% of cases get resolved in a year, and some take a couple years.. (usually DUI’s and such where people have attorneys who are going back and forth with the board).. A nurse that’s found with a needle in their arm in a patient bathroom will get a speedy “trial”, and a speedy hanging in the public square. The board can literally meet telephonically and suspend a license the same day.. A situation like you’ve laid out- where a family member claims without proof that you might have taken something - is weak, unsexy and requires work on the part of the investigator. They’ll definitely be looking at your record of complaints with them, they might pull criminal history on you, and they might even have to contact other patients that you’ve cared for and previous employers - and get interviews with them. But - in a he-said, she-said, the shortcut is to get you to admit that you did it, or cast doubt on yourself in some other way.. in an interview with you. If your attorney cut-them-off-at-the-pass, they still might demand that in-person interview.. but your attorney can probably force them to show their hand a little- and if the complaint is weak, it’ll be easier to push it to the back of the queue and go after easier prey. As hard as it is, the longer the board delays things, the better it is for you. If the patient’s family had you on tape dumping gramma’s Percocet’s down your gullet & washing them down with a bottle of Jim Beam, you’ld already be in jail, and your license would have been suspended. good luck.
  10. rzyzzy

    Riots in Minneapolis

    https://www.axios.com/dallas-dc-protests-police-george-floyd-kettle-da41095b-74ee-40b0-be07-49a3bff62934.html One reason protests turn violent..
  11. rzyzzy

    Riots in Minneapolis

    Part of the problem is assuming that “peaceful protest” and “lawful assembly” is still possible in this country - it’s not. The peaceful protests over the Dakota pipeline were met with new laws justifying militarized police action. sure, on a Sunday morning “quilters against the tampon tax” will be allowed to protest for a couple hours, as long as there aren’t enough of them to matter.. bring 10,000 actual “grassroots” protesters to any town in this country & you’re going to see the police turn into people who shoot unarmed people with pepper balls, arrest and rough up journalists & “herd” protesters into arrest traps. The police are trained to “put down” protests, not to accept them or god forbid, learn from them. streaming media makes it possible for anyone who cares to watch to see it for themselves. I watched a couple nights of Houston protests turn into an “arrest trap” for peaceful protests.. the protesters were guided by blocked streets into a box, the box is “closed off” by police, protesters are ordered to “disperse” (but aren’t allowed to disperse because the box is closed-off by armed officers), then everyone is arrested for “blocking streets” or some other nonsense. In Houston, a few hundred non-violent protesters were scooped up each night using the “box” technique. Did you hear about it? Prolly not.. you just assumed the few hundred people arrested were “thugs” - the narrative given by the police. Houston’s “box” on Saturday night happened conveniently just before 10 pm, giving the 11 o’clock news an opportunity to show a few dozen peaceful protesters to be “perp walked” in zip-ties to satisfy the “law-and-order” crowd, while ignoring 99% of the actual criminals who were out. This is widespread and pervasive. You don’t actually have any right to protest your government anymore. This fact leads to escalating tension.
  12. +1 In the case I was involved in, had I answered questions during my “friendly” phone call, or written an answer myself (without an attorney), my natural answers would have been different that the answers I gave with attorney advice - neither answer would be lying, but my natural answers would have left opportunity to be turned against me. as you’re already aware, no matter how nice these folks are being at this point, they’re a hammer looking for a nail to pound on - discipline is all they do, they’re just not going to pat you on the back, commiserate & move along. Someone is going to get hit with the hammer, rightly or wrongly. think perjury trap, Martha Stewart, etc. having gone through it once, I’d lawyer up twice as fast in the future- no matter the cost. I would not speak with anyone, ever, without my lawyer next to me. The more you know about the process, the more terrifying it is.
  13. Unfortunately, there’s nothing good that can come out of an “interview” for you & lots of bad things could happen. Most states notify & can require your participation just by sending a mailed letter to the address on file for your BON. When the letter comes, you hire the attorney & the attorney can usually determine what the complaint is about before the interview. There’s often a legally-required list of questions that you’re required to answer before the interview & you should be filling that out with your attorney’s advice. Lots of pitfalls there. A literal minefield. Further, many investigations involve multiple agencies that each try to do investigations themselves and they can and do use pieces of your statements to other agencies to build a case against you. Many states have an agency that represents older or “vulnerable” adults, an attorney general, and various departments like CMS that are all effectively “law enforcement” and have the ability to bury you professionally. In the investigation that I was subjected to, my first notification of a complaint was from that agency that was charged with protecting the “vulnerable” adults in my state, requesting a statement right then, over the phone. That conversation was very friendly and low-key, and I simply refused to make any statement without an attorney’s advice. That was followed by a letter from the board, with a list of questions that I was required to answer and swear to. When my response (with the attorney’s help) was sent, the BON and this other agency were conducting parallel investigations, and sharing information. Fast-forward (or more like slow-forward) seven months - and a few days before my in-person meeting with my attorney and the board’s investigator, additional details were revealed to my attorney. It turned out that the complainant in my case was a serial complainer who had made several unfounded accusations before mine, and a couple more complaints after. He bragged about getting me fired and threatened an aide with getting her fired too if she complained about his sexual assault. Even after the investigation by the BON was completed and found to be unsubstantiated, the agency that was charged with protecting vulnerable adults closed their investigation with the statement that the allegations were neither “founded nor unfounded” - without ever talking with me. Further, my attorney explained that nothing in either investigation precluded the attorney general from filing a criminal complaint anywhere in the process - and using any data or statements gathered from any source against me. The entire process is incredibly prejudiced against the nurse. Yeah, you have a right to remain silent as an American, but you lose that right if you want to remain a nurse. You have a right to confront your accuser, unless they’re “vulnerable”.. My accuser was the polar opposite of “vulnerable”, but the definition of vulnerable under the law isn’t the same as any sane person would give. TLDR: No statements at all without the advice of an attorney.
  14. rzyzzy

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    LTC is staffed almost exclusively with LPN’s in many areas of the country. Fun question - what skills/procedures can a BSN RN do in your state that an LPN can’t do? The list is probably pretty short..
  15. rzyzzy

    Executives Receive Bonus, Staff Asked to Sacrifice

    The fundamental flaw in this argument is in the actual value of work - the perception that those who count the money are somehow entitled to keep most of it for themselves. It’s much larger than nursing, but any CEO that claims to “value” their productive employees (while laying them off), and simultaneously take a 25% bonus is being dishonest. That’s not “we’re all in this together”, it’s greed. There’s definitely a place for greed in our society, but there are limitations and repercussions for letting it get out of hand, just like there rightfully are repercussions for getting plastered at the company Christmas party. How many employers put behavioral limitations in their employee handbooks? “Don’t do anything that would disparage the company while in uniform”. When was the last time you saw someone who made $25,000 a year get a $6000 bonus? The “education and experience” of these already highly-compensated workers doesn’t justify the bonuses they received. They’re not that smart, and they’re not that experienced. They’re grifters and leeches, and they’ve been exposed (righteously!) for what they are. The grumpiness of the people who see these kinds of things is understandable and just.
  16. rzyzzy

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    Not sure where you get a “two year” nursing degree, but it wasn’t possible at my community college.. there are pre-requisites before you can even apply to the nursing program, and my program was four semesters..
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