Interviewing - do I mention I'm working?

Posted

Has 1 years experience.

I'm one of the fortunate few who was lucky enough to have a job waiting for me out of school - the unfortunate part of it was I knew exactly what I was getting into and already knew lot about the unit and what problems I'd face working there. I took the job because I felt like I'd be crazy not to do that, but the retention rates are low, patient ratios are high, morale is poor and I have my reservations. I'm trying to stick around and use it as a learning experience to build my knowledge but also stay open to other possibilities.

My biggest problem/fear is that I've never gone on the dreaded interview - not for a nursing job at least. I feel completely unprepared! Should I mention that I'm currently working and where on my resume when applying? The world is so small and I know that the hospital I'm at would feel slighted if they knew I was looking, but I'm also interested in building my interviewing skills and seeing what other opportunities are available, and I don't want to find myself in a position years from now where I go to an interview as an experienced nurse and come across badly. I don't want to be dishonest and tell them I have no experience, but I'm not sure how to answer the "why are you looking after 3 months" question as well and I worry I could put my employment in jeopardy while I'm still on orientation. Thoughts?

~Shrek~

329 Posts

If they have a poor retention rate they shouldn't feel too surprised that you are leaving and it would be extremely unethical for them to 'punish' you for leaving.

Apply to other jobs, and put it on your resume--it will come up on background checks and stuff anyways and it's best to be upfront and honest about it. Come up with a good reason for why you are applying to other jobs that doesn't bash the other hospital--don't go on a rant about how much you hate the job or something. "High patient ratios" is a good reason. A lot of places want to know if you were fired or something so make sure that you explain that you are choosing to leave.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience. 3,677 Posts

I would put it on your resume. The experience will still help you, but interviewers will ask you why you are considering leaving, and you need to be prepared to answer this.

peachnurse22

21 Posts

I was in a much similar situation this year. What kind of unit are you on? Are you miserable? Can you tolerate it for a few more months? I felt the same way about my job…on a busy medical unit with a 1:6 patient ratio and poor morale (I had done my practicum there in nursing school, so like you, I knew what I was getting in to). I told myself to make it a year. That proved to be impossible with some infuriating situations I was put in- I left after 11 months.

It never hurts to apply to jobs and interviews are great experiences regardless of getting the job or not. See what else is out there! If you can make it a year in your current role, that's great. If not, try and make it 6-9 months. As long as this next job is somewhere you know you'll stay for 2 years or more, you'll be fine and won't be seen as a "job hopper" on your resume (if that is of concern to you).

Best of luck to you! :)

Nienna Celebrindal

Has 12 years experience. 613 Posts

Absolutely put it on your resume, be prepared to address it professionally (which is tough to do).

I highly recommend going to youtube and searching RN interviews, you will find sooo much outstanding advice.

psu_213, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant. Has 6 years experience. 3,869 Posts

Absolutely put it on your resume and address it when it comes up in the interview; but, be sure not to sound like you are leaving you current job because that job has issues. Rather, make sure it is clear you want to move to this new job because of the upsides of the new job and that you excited to bring your talents to this new workplace.

seconddegreebsn

Has 1 years experience. 311 Posts

I was in a much similar situation this year. What kind of unit are you on? Are you miserable? Can you tolerate it for a few more months? I felt the same way about my job…on a busy medical unit with a 1:6 patient ratio and poor morale (I had done my practicum there in nursing school, so like you, I knew what I was getting in to). I told myself to make it a year. That proved to be impossible with some infuriating situations I was put in- I left after 11 months.

It never hurts to apply to jobs and interviews are great experiences regardless of getting the job or not. See what else is out there! If you can make it a year in your current role, that's great. If not, try and make it 6-9 months. As long as this next job is somewhere you know you'll stay for 2 years or more, you'll be fine and won't be seen as a "job hopper" on your resume (if that is of concern to you).

Best of luck to you! :)

I'm on a med surg unit doing 12 hour night shifts, which is adversely affecting my physical and mental health, and I'm starting to worry about my ability to practice safely because I am having such a hard time adjusting to the schedule. I'm a very light sleeper and haven't gotten more than an hour of continuous sleep at a time, blackout curtains and noise machines don't help. I don't like how it's impacting my marriage, I'm just pretty unhappy and that's coloring a lot of how I'm looking at this career choice and filling me with regret and worry. I'm sure the job could be worse, but I couldn't tell you if it's any better or worse than other options out there (the attrition rate makes me think it may be). I was very wary to start out my career there because of the manager and seeing other new grads struggle on the floor - several people actually reached out and advised me not to work there. The upcoming departure of several senior staff nurses who precepted and acted as clinical resources makes me feel worried since I rely on their help/advise a lot while learning the ropes. I know I need to "pay my dues" but I'm trying to protect myself from burning out quickly and even a switch from nights to days would make a huge difference. From what I've seen over the past several months, it's very hard to transfer or move to days (I was passed over for a transfer once before in favor of someone less senior, which seems like a sign I'd be wise to look elsewhere) and if I stayed I'd likely be here for several years before I could move to another floor. I think you're right - I will try to stick it out for at least one year, if I can. I know that many people apply to hundreds of jobs and don't hear back for months, so I figured it wouldn't hurt to get a jump on it and put some feelers out there. Thanks for the advice everyone.

peachnurse22

21 Posts

Yeah if you're working nights and completely miserable- I think it's time to move on. I completely missed that original part of the story lol

It sounds like your current hospital isn't great for transitioning to other areas, and if you doubt that you could be on day shift to help gain some balance back in your life- it's time to start looking elsewhere. If you're miserable there is no need to stay- you deserve to be happy! :)