what training could help in getting rn job in US?

  1. hi there!
    after passing ielts, nclex and getting a visa screen...and while waiting for the processing...and the on going retrogression...
    what specific training or experience would really help me find a good rn job in the US?
    some friends told me to train under dialysis nursing, etc, etc.
    would these training really help me or not? and if they will... what area would you recommend?
    your inputs and advice are welcome...
  2. Visit kev_rn profile page

    About kev_rn

    Joined: Mar '07; Posts: 5

    4 Comments

  3. by   RNHawaii34
    Quote from kev_rn
    hi there!
    after passing ielts, nclex and getting a visa screen...and while waiting for the processing...and the on going retrogression...
    what specific training or experience would really help me find a good rn job in the us?
    some friends told me to train under dialysis nursing, etc, etc.
    would these training really help me or not? and if they will... what area would you recommend?
    your inputs and advice are welcome...
    work experience or "training" in the philippines is not recognized here in the united states..if a us hospital hires you, they will place you in a new grad's or new rn program, that is a long orientation with pay, and they will orient you with a rn preceptor. so, if i were you, i will not even pay money for any so called " training" in a special unit, or a nursing specialty there..i would rather find a place there that will actually pay me a salary..or you can also keep continue studying your books, keep your knowledge and skills updated while waiting for the visascreen, and retrogression to be over...if you choose a play to work, a medical-surgical dept. is a good place to start. then you can walk your way up to another special areas in nursing. just be patient, and everything will pay off later..trust me, i been there:wink2:
  4. by   john83
    Quote from rnhawaii34
    work experience or "training" in the philippines is not recognized here in the united states..if a us hospital hires you, they will place you in a new grad's or new rn program, that is a long orientation with pay, and they will orient you with a rn preceptor. so, if i were you, i will not even pay money for any so called " training" in a special unit, or a nursing specialty there..i would rather find a place there that will actually pay me a salary..or you can also keep continue studying your books, keep your knowledge and skills updated while waiting for the visascreen, and retrogression to be over...if you choose a play to work, a medical-surgical dept. is a good place to start. then you can walk your way up to another special areas in nursing. just be patient, and everything will pay off later..trust me, i been there:wink2:
    in addition to the suggestions above, i think it would also help if you train/work in a hospital with lots of international accreditation(iso, jcaho, etc.). though hospital setting is different in the us, working would somehow boost your confidence. that being said doesn't mean that you have to stop studying and getting accredited trainings and seminars.
  5. by   Juniii
    An ICU or an ER experience would be a great area to build and hone your "critical thinking skills" especially on a big tertiary hospital in the Philippines.
    It is not enough that you know how to perform or assist in a procedure but also know the reason behind it as to why it was done. You should know your
    basics: anatomy,physiology, as well as disease process. Once you confident with your skills and knowledge you will be able to detect if things is running well on your patient or not. Being able to anticipate what , when and why is an advantage. Often your nursing judgement will be tested . It would help you if you would test your nursing critical thinking skills in a familiar settings first in the Philippines.
  6. by   k3immigrant
    yup, they're right.before i came to the US, i went for "trainings" & obtained certificates that even have numbers that states it is recognized here in the US, too bad it is not. One thing that you need to brush on are the basics like physiology because that's how you connect what you've learned to what you see in your patients. if in case you decide to work, try talking to md/residents & ask questions & you'll learn, anyway, in nursing, everyday you'll learn something new - that's the joy of our profession.

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