Integrative Health & Healing DNP--is it worth it?

Posted

I am accepted to begin the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at the University of Minnesota beginning in September. I will be pursuing the psychiatric mental health specialty, but recently the thought of adding in the integrated health and healing (IHH) specialty has piqued my interest.

I requested more information on the program recently, and have received several e-mails from various individuals involved with the IHH program about everything from how to add on the specialty to encouragement to take 3-4 of their courses in Hawaii next January. I was even put in touch with a current student who is pursuing both tracks, and I was able to ask her some questions about how she is managing everything.

Today, I met with a veteran mental health social worker; she and I carpooled to a meeting. The topic of school was brought up, and I mentioned my recent interest in this IHH program. Her response gave me some food for thought, and I would like your honest opinion(s) as well: Is integrated health and healing worth pursuing a DNP in? The U of M charges just under 1k per credit, so adding in the IHH classes would substantially increase my tuition, not to mention adding the extra time commitment (and stress). Would the potential employment benefits, if any, be worth the price?

The veteran social worker advised me to take a couple of classes in aromatherapy and yoga and call it a day :)

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website. 5,978 Posts

I think the SW is right.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 16 years experience. 226 Articles; 27,608 Posts

Hello, there. Your thread has been moved to the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) forum with the ultimate goal of increasing the number of responses. Good luck!

guest538567

guest538567

171 Posts

What are you going to do with the IHH training? I do not think this will add to employment opportunities in most clinical areas. It looks like the program qualifies you to take an IHH certification exam through the AHNCC. However, you also qualify for this exam if you have 48 Continuing Education credits in holistic nursing within the past 2 years. My guess is you could attend a conference to obtain these credits. If you have a local AHEC, they often have classes on alternative health modalities. I will add that I am a practicing NP and have never heard of this certification area. Good luck.

PG2018

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry. 1,413 Posts

The IHH stuff isn't going to do anything. In psychiatry, you're going to have a full day of clients or consumers or whatever PC phrase we're calling patients now. Having said that, you aren't going to bill for any IHH extras, and you're rather unlikely to be hired because you're trained in IHH unless you pursue some type of academic appointment or role in a company that touts IHH. So as a practitioner, no it's largely a waste of time and expense.

Now, education isn't so bad. It's good for you, and I want more of it myself. However, unless I become a physician, there is no education that will make me a higher paid NP or allow me to bill more. Of course, education can serve a personally fulfilling role, and there are a variety of educational paths that interest me. As cool as it would be for me to have a PhD in American history or experimental psychology they would largely absorb my time and money away when I could instead focus on my family, church, hobbies, or work.

If you want to learn about CAM, I would suggest (as simplistic as this is) you buy some books on essential oils, herbs, exercises and other activities, and take community ed classes and similar workshops where possible. You can integrate that into your practice too, but whether it's billable...probably not.

Another mentioned yoga, that's great for you and your patients if you can go over it with them and encourage them to participate. My wife and I, quite oppositely, are talking about taking fencing classes (sword fighting)!

nursefizer10

nursefizer10

Specializes in Emergency. Has 2 years experience. 6 Posts

can you email me how you liek the psych program at UMN and if you decided to add those additional classes ?

elkpark

14,633 Posts

I wouldn't waste the money and time, for the reasons already noted.

sauce

sauce

178 Posts

lol waste of money. if you want to teach people yoga start a yoga class. That title is just another BS way for the college to make some more cash off of you.

Also, 1k per credit is ridiculous. wholy cow who would pay that much for a dang nursing degree. I think mine was like 400 and i still paid too much. For 1k they better paint your nails for you and hopefully give you a company f150 limited edition chuck norris model.

AndersRN

AndersRN

171 Posts

Seriously! What is that?

layintracks

layintracks

33 Posts

I have a friend who has a dual specialty in both FNP and PMHNP and she did a DNP in Integrated/Holistic Health. She started out in a well established practice and makes well over $200,000 a year (net) in her own holistic healthcare practice now. So to all the naysayers.... there you go. Its all about your passion, ambition, determination, and what you want to do with it.

elkpark

14,633 Posts

I have a friend who has a dual specialty in both FNP and PMHNP and she did a DNP in Integrated/Holistic Health. She started out in a well established practice and makes well over $200,000 a year (net) in her own holistic healthcare practice now. So to all the naysayers.... there you go. Its all about your passion, ambition, determination, and what you want to do with it.

Yeah, as the old saying goes, there's a sucker born every minute ...

Psychcns

Psychcns

Specializes in Psychiatric Nursing. Has 30 years experience. 3 Articles; 859 Posts

Is integrated/holistic health billable under Medicare,Medicaid, insurance companies? What about nutritional products. Or is it all private pay. Or are the procedures insurances cover broad enough to be billed?!