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Important Question about Nursing!

Pre-Nursing   (4,288 Views 31 Comments)
by miszzkayx3 miszzkayx3 (New Member) New Member

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TransplantRN3 has 6 years experience.

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I graduated from a second degree accelerated BSN program (first degree was in Biology), and had no troubles finding a job at my hospital. Of the new grads that started with me, we had some that finished a traditional 4-year nursing program and some that did a second degree program.I don't think it matters, a bachelor's in nursing is a bachelor's in nursing. You would save time and money if you did the traditional program, but that may limit you if you want to go to PA/med school later... I guess it depends on your ultimate goals.

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metal_m0nk is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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You got me :) So the accelerated BSN PROGRAM is it good of a use as the 4 year bsn

I doubt an employer is going to ask you whether you received your BSN from a traditional or accelerated program. A BSN is a BSN.

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noahsmama specializes in pediatrics, public health.

827 Posts; 11,647 Profile Views

I have an accelerated BSN, and when I was hired as a new grad, the other new grads were a mix of people who had done the traditional 4 year program plus at least one other person who had done the accelerated BSN. I don't think it makes a difference one way or another to hiring managers.

If you do decide to eventually switch tracks and go for a PA, I don't think it would make much difference if you already had a degree in biology vs. already having a degree in nursing -- but then, since I've never considered becoming a PA, I don't know that for sure.

Can you easily switch majors from biology to nursing at your current school? If so, it might make sense to do that now -- one disadvantage of getting the degree in biology and then doing an accelerated BSN is that you'd have to apply and get accepted to the ABSN program, and like most other nursing programs, they have way more qualified applicants than they can accept. Also, you have the added expense of the ABSN program (and they're quite expensive, much more so than one year of a traditional bachelors degree program) on top of your first bachelors degree.

I think either path could be a good path, it really depends on what you enjoy studying.

Good luck!

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 103,413 Profile Views

You got me :) So the accelerated BSN PROGRAM is it good of a use as the 4 year bsn

It's just my personal opinion (I'm certainly not any kind of national authority or anything on this subject :)), but I would think that the overall reputation of the school you attend is more significant than whether you graduated from a traditional or accelerated BSN program. Nursing is a pretty small, tight "club" -- decision-makers and leaders in nursing usually have a pretty good idea of how strong or weak the nursing programs in their area are, and that can definitely make a difference in hiring (esp. these days, when there is so v. much competition for a limited number of positions for new grads).

What I don't get, though, is, if you're "99%" sure you want to go into nursing, why you would choose to take a different degree first. I disagree that a biology degree will be an asset in nursing (except for any personal satisfaction and enrichment you get from it). Most people coming into nursing with a previous degree or career are pretty put out to discover that their degree(s) in other areas, even sciences, don't count for much in nursing. But it makes more sense if you turn the situation around -- how much would a nursing degree benefit (professionally -- again, not in terms of personal satisfaction or anything) someone who was trying to make a career in biology?? If you want to be a nurse, get a nursing degree. You won't get much "bang for the buck" within nursing for any other undergrad degree.

Best wishes for your journey!

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52 Posts; 1,581 Profile Views

I dont have a Bachelors in anything and as soon as I finish my pre reqs I will be applying for the accelerated BSN program, so depending on the school you do not have to have a degree in anything to apply to the bsn as long as you meet the pre req's which in most cases are just as many credit hours as an Associates Degree or more, in my case I need about 75 credit hours to apply to the 15 month accelerated BSN, this includes a few pre nursing courses. I have also inquired to see if it would make ANY difference if I did this program vs the traditional 4 year and have gotten the same resonse over and over: NO.

good luck

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anurseatlast has 4 years experience and specializes in maternal child, public/community health.

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It's just my personal opinion (I'm certainly not any kind of national authority or anything on this subject :)), but I would think that the overall reputation of the school you attend is more significant than whether you graduated from a traditional or accelerated BSN program. Nursing is a pretty small, tight "club" -- decision-makers and leaders in nursing usually have a pretty good idea of how strong or weak the nursing programs in their area are, and that can definitely make a difference in hiring (esp. these days, when there is so v. much competition for a limited number of positions for new grads).

I agree that the reputation of the school is more significant than whether you do a traditional or accelerated program. Be sure to check out the school - how many grads pass boards the first time, do their credits transfer to other schools, etc. Once you complete the program (regardless of which you choose), you have to pass boards to get your RN. After that, you are a Rn with a BSN. I don't think most employers care. which program you went through.

Requirements to get in an accelerated program vary greatly. The program I attended is the only one in my area that accepts students with an associates degree. (Everyone had to have the same pre-reqs regardless of what their previous degree was) Be sure to check that you are getting the required classes.

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LoveMyBugs is a BSN, CNA, RN and specializes in Pediatrics.

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you have gotten some great advice on here already, thought I would throw my :twocents: in.

Since you are 99% sure you want to go into nursing, but have mentioned going the PA route, why don't you do the 4 year get the BSN and then later pursue a masters for a nurse practicitior?

Depending on where you want to work and what you specialze in as a NP you and the PA could have very similar roles.

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68 Posts; 2,448 Profile Views

You get the same degree as someone who took it at a 4 yr school. Hospitals aren't going to care if you did it in 4 years of 15 months. Nurses apply to hospitals with a BSN, AS, or diploma. Most hospitals don't go too much into the education unless you are applying for a upper management position.

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1,068 Posts; 26,354 Profile Views

Nicole:

Some hospitals care very much about graduation at all levels -- not just upper management levels. There are two hospitals in my town, and neither will hire diploma graduates into new nurse positions.

One brought on 75 new grads this year, of which there were only 8 spaces for ADN grads. The other 90% were for BSN or Direct entry MSN.

The other hospital hired 30 new grads: 15 ADN and 15 BSN.

In my town there are two nursing programs that produce 200 new RNs per year (110 BSN and 90 ADN). So those 90 ADN are competing for 20 jobs for ADNs in town at hospitals.

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68 Posts; 2,448 Profile Views

Well when I went for my interview at a huge trauma center in my area, the nurse recruiter told me that she "trusts" the nurses that graduated from the community college I graduated from more then some of the universities in our area.

I got the job at this hospital that only had 5 other openings for nurses in the whole hospital. So I guess its just where your located (I'm in NJ).

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Anoetos has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency Nursing.

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Note: by 2015, NP will be a DNP and no longer just an MSN.

Then again, if you're young and you're thinking about the PA route, why not just go a few years longer and get your MD?

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Anoetos has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency Nursing.

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Ok so right now I am starting fall semester as a freshman. BIOLOGY MAJOR.. I want to do nursing 99% so i it better to get my biology degree then go to an accelerated nusing program? or should I go to LIU nursing program for 4 years. Does an accelerated student get a job like the LIU nursing program student? I want to get my bio degree because maybe I will change my mind and go to PA school etc... or is the liu nursing school better? do they get the same jobs? I NEED HELP!

The answer to your question is to do whatever works best for you.

For the sake of time, and if you already have most of your pre-reqs/co-reqs done, it probably makes sense to try to get into a traditional BSN pre-licensure program, or an accelerated pre-licensure program (if you can get in). All in, the latter takes about a year less than the traditional. Both include general education credits.

You can go the ADN route and get working as a nurse and get your BSN later but I think it's best to go ahead and get the BSN now, you're pretty much going to have to anyway.

As for their balance, a BSN is a BSN is a BSN. Like Elkpark said, it has much more to do with the quality of your school, the curricula are more or less identical.

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