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I'm Scared of Getting Fired

Male Students   (4,806 Views | 15 Replies)
by Happychicken Happychicken (New) New

Happychicken has 1 years experience .

543 Profile Views; 4 Posts

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On 11/7/2019 at 5:25 AM, IndiCRNA said:

If you choose to work in a non-union facility in a right to work state you can be fired for any or no reason at any time.

 

Right to work means that you can work at a union job but refuse to join the union, which we're not going to argue about if that's a good choice or not here.

You're thinking of "at-will employment."  That's the one where they can fire you just because it's Tuesday.  But they're still bound by laws. Firing you for any of the protected classes or in retaliation for being a whistleblower or testifying is illegal and you can sue and will win.  If it's not something that they can hold up in interviews with unemployment, they'll have to pay into that (just remember in some states, unemployment assumes you're completely at fault if you get fired, so it'll be a process, but there's ways you can really help yourself win).

OP, use the same logic that's going to be drilled in your head through your entire healthcare career and schooling: Document EVERYTHING.  If patient rooms get reassigned, document you did a handoff.  If you have to report something to the charge nurse, document that you reported it, you just need a simple note.  If it's not in the chart, it never happened. 

And if you do get any writeups, don't make the same mistakes that most people do that end up costing them their job. Request a day to prepare your statement before signing it.  Some jobs will let you, but for most, you're written up and there's a process to follow to fight it.  If they don't let you, still sign the paper, refusing to sign it doesn't make it go away and it's not admitting fault, but for your statement just write that you're going to be giving HR and your manager a written statement preferably by the next day's date if they didn't already ask you for a statement before writing you up (also, if they ever ask you for a statement, assume you might be getting written up and same thing, you'll write it out and turn it in or email it to them.  No matter what you say, you're probably getting written up, so avoid talking until you've had the time to think about it, write it down, and make sure you got every detail in there).  NEVER put your full statement directly on the writeup, because anything you forget to write never happened, and anything you wrote, that's exactly how it happened, and you're being fueled by emotion right now, but ALWAYS write that you will be submitting a written statement.  And leave it at that.  Don't talk about the writeup, especially if there's a witness in the room to sign the writeup.  Don't answer questions.  Don't make comments.  Just state that you're going to be turning in a statement that explains your side of the story. Keep it completely objective to where your manager is just explaining why you're written up.  Get through the day, let yourself calm down because you're probably mad about your writeup, then go home, have something to eat, then just sit down and write out your statement of what happened.

Edited by tonyl1234

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organichombre has 34 years experience as a ADN, BSN, MSN, LPN, RN and specializes in critical care, med/surg.

206 Posts; 4,101 Profile Views

Overachievers and type A personalities do well in nursing careers. Often they seem to move into the ICU and other specialty areas. Management is management wherever you are. Bottom line, as others have pointed out, nurses make up the largest expenditure in a facility and will be the first to take a hit. As a male in nursing I have had a pretty good career. You are used to working with men and  I would imagine male nurses will get along with you pretty well too. I know, a bit chauvinistic but that's the reality. Ask any female nurse who has been in the military. And please stay away from all the "he said she said BS!" Good luck!

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windsurfer8 has 13 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Psych/Military Nursing.

1,277 Posts; 11,225 Profile Views

If you screw up you can get fired.  Just like any job.  I don't know what else to tell you.   If you are looking for "good vibes" then you will get sugar coated nonsense.  I have seen people walked out of hospitals who screwed up.  More than likely if you pay attention and work hard you will be ok. 

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Happychicken has 1 years experience.

4 Posts; 543 Profile Views

Update as I’ve gotten some replies:

 

I went back to a civil engineering company, working as a technician while I reinstate my license. I was pushed in that direction by nurses and paramedics I respected. I’m with a better company and not working on the highway in unsafe conditions like before. I’m glad to have done CNA and EMT, as I learned a lot of people skills from healthcare. Hopefully I’ll get back into EMT when I retire. All jobs are just jobs but I’m glad to be doing what I went to school for again. It’s pretty wild to go from nights on a stroke floor to the sun in long long days inspecting soil. Thanks for the comments. I’m glad I am not involved with COVID.

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