I'm in FNP school. A staff RN speaks of negatives to it.

Specialties NP

Published

Hello members. I am entering FNP school this fall 2009 in Honolulu Hawaii. I was visiting my aunty who is in the ICU but recovering really well! :yeah: at a large medical facility. I spoke with 3 RN's so far because of my aunty who keeps on telling them that I am an RN who is entering to get his master's in the fall. All of them spoke about the pay first. They told me that as a staff RN after 1 year, their salary jumps from about $54,000 to about $86,000/year before taxes. I believe it because the website of the medical facility also states their pay rate agreement with the union. Sometimes they would make more with overtime...etc...six figures or more.

They stated that I would be making less as a FNP and I won't be able to work in inpatient settings only outpatient, therefore making even less money than staff RNs. I didn't believe that because I did my homework on allnurses.com and FNP's has been stating they made near six figures or more than $100,000 working the regular 40 hours a week. Also, I have been told FNP's are allowed to work in inpatient settings such as the ER, med/surg, and other units because they get training to work in the unit by the facility. Sort of like orientation training first if they get called to work in an ICU. Am i right here?

Basically the RNs said:

Positives:

1. More prestige (get to wear a lab coat with your name on it with ur credentials)

2. Less actual physical work such as turning pt's Q2H.

3. More regular work hours.

4. Prescriptive priviledge's.

Negatives:

1. NP's in general, pay is lower than staff RN's. Staff RNs can easily make $100,000 or more with overtime.

2. Salary pay. You may have to come in and not get compensated extra for it during offpeak hours.

3. May be on-call.

4. You're missing out on work and getting more RN experience by going back to school for your master's.

5. Again pay: NP's work harder with more responsibilities for less pay than a staff RN.

6. You can't work in inpatient units because of being an FNP.

However, these negatives are not drawing me away from going to the FNP program to become an FNP. From what I also heard from my professors, in the long run at about 5 years or less of working, I would be making more as a FNP than a staff RN, during the regular 40 hour work week, not including overtime work. Also, it is more likely that I will have more "regular" work hours such as 8-10 hour shifts during the day. My professors who are also FNP's themselves, work in clinics and inpatient units. All of this TRUE/FALSE? In my knowledge, it's true.

They included that the work of NP's would be in most cases, less physically demanding; on the feet running around, turning pt's, lifting them up the bed, ambulating, etc. Sort of like physicians, who usually treat medical conditions by writing orders. I've seen physician's who are competent to still work into their 70-80's. Look at Japan for example, retired doctors were asked by the government to continue practicing and they were able to. I haven't seen/heard of many RN's who did bedside nursing in their 80's.

Trauma Columnist

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN

88 Articles; 21,246 Posts

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

I think you always have detractors. Some of the reasons RNs like to put down those who pursue higher education:

1. Fear that they will be your subordinate.

2. Concern that they are losing another bedside nurse.

3. Angst that they don't want to pursue a higher degree.

4. Jealousy that you will have more options as you age.

I was an RN for 14 years before finishing my APN education. I get this sometimes. My main reason for pursuing an advanced degree wasn't because I didn't like being a nurse, but rather that I knew I would need options as I aged.

Don't know about your salary figures though. I would certainly guess that Hawaii pays more because the cost of living is more. Here, in central IL I did negotiate for a significant raise when I graduated but it was based on my RN experience.

Specializes in ICU/CCU/MICU/SICU/CTICU.

It depends on where you work as to your pay. It also depends on your state board of nursing if you can work in inpatient settings as an FNP. I know where I live, the FNP role is being seriously looked at by the BON, and they are looking at taking away inpatient opportunities for FNP's because of the education they get.

As Trauma said, most people who give you negatives do it for their own reasons. I am about to begin a DNP program in Aug... several nurses that I work with and around have made the comment "why are you going to waste your time going through all that school when I will be making more than you?"............ ummmm, education is never a waste of time, it is one of my goals, pay increases with experience....

Trauma Columnist

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN

88 Articles; 21,246 Posts

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

Congrats cardiotrans on going for the DNP.

Specializes in ICU/CCU/MICU/SICU/CTICU.
Congrats cardiotrans on going for the DNP.

Thanks!! I am nervous, excited and scared out of my mind all at the same time!

Editorial Team / Admin

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

17 Articles; 44,720 Posts

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

So proud of you, Cardiotrans!!!!!!!!! Good luck and let us know how things are going.

I think it's sour grapes on their part...I know many NP's making more than 6 figures. Don't let the nay-sayers squash your dreams. Besides, even if you start out at the same pay with where you you were, you will quickly make more, and much more importantly, have WAY more options down the road. If it were easy, everyone would do it. ;)

Gator FNP

65 Posts

Specializes in family, internal, pediatric.

I have found that many RNs resent those of us that go on for higher degrees. I know not all RNs feel this way!

Many reasons exist to go on with your education, it may be that you want to do more for the patient and be their provider, not follow orders written by NPs or MDs. After you become a FNP (or while in school) you will realize the large difference between being an RN and a NP.

I found that I increased my salary significantly from that of an RN. Once again, it depends where you work. Over time, your salary will increase quicker than an RN (hospital raises are a small percentage yearly).

Also as a NP, you are in control of your salary, you negotiate this as well as benefits, once again depends where you work, but even large organizations are negotiable.

Specializes in ICU/CCU/MICU/SICU/CTICU.
So proud of you, Cardiotrans!!!!!!!!! Good luck and let us know how things are going.

Thanks and I definitely will Siri!!!! You may be getting some pm's from me asking why on earth I did this to myself! ;)

FNPdude74

219 Posts

Specializes in FNP-C.
I have found that many RNs resent those of us that go on for higher degrees. I know not all RNs feel this way!

Many reasons exist to go on with your education, it may be that you want to do more for the patient and be their provider, not follow orders written by NPs or MDs. After you become a FNP (or while in school) you will realize the large difference between being an RN and a NP.

I found that I increased my salary significantly from that of an RN. Once again, it depends where you work. Over time, your salary will increase quicker than an RN (hospital raises are a small percentage yearly).

Also as a NP, you are in control of your salary, you negotiate this as well as benefits, once again depends where you work, but even large organizations are negotiable.

Yeah this is nearly the same thing my clinical professors who are FNP's in my nursing school when I was getting my bachelors. Thanks everyone. I know its not all about the money but its about the different role and responsibilities. Although in business sense, hospitals are in for business.

caliotter3

38,333 Posts

I wouldn't let professional jealousy influence your decisions unless you turn it into an incentive to achieve your goals.

+ Add a Comment

By using the site, you agree with our Policies. X