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I want my MSN, but...

Posted

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

When I was getting my BSN, I thought that was as high as I wanted to go, and I had no interest in becoming an NP. I still have no interest in becoming an NP, but I want my MSN. My question to myself now is what am I going to get my MSN in? I have zero desire to pursue being an NP, and I actually liked bedside. I toy with getting it in education, but I'm not totally feeling the itch to go teach at a nursing school.

Besides going into administration or becoming a nurse practitioner, what can you do with your master's that's still bedside?

Miss.LeoRN

Specializes in Cardiac Stepdown, PCU.

I was just considering making a topic on this as well! I feel the exact same as you. I saw the forum on Clinical Nurse Specialist, but it looks like it's an almost dead field that was absorbed into NP... but I have no interest in NP or administration. I want to do bedside. Definitely watching this for thoughts.

rumwynnieRN

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

I was just considering making a topic on this as well! I feel the exact same as you. I saw the forum on Clinical Nurse Specialist, but it looks like it's an almost dead field that was absorbed into NP... but I have no interest in NP or administration. I want to do bedside. Definitely watching this for thoughts.

I was looking at the same concentration, but when I saw the university close to where I live no longer offers it, I thought, "...well there goes the one thing I wanted to do."

I could pursue the whole DNP route for that, but I don't know. I think I would hate being in administration more than being an NP. I drew the line there when the house supervisor at my last facility had to figure out where to put one of the bodies in the morgue after there wasn't room anymore. As comical as I found that, I really don't want to have to decide who stays outside for an hour :X

chiandre

Specializes in EDUCATION;HOMECARE;MATERNAL-CHILD; PSYCH. Has 25 years experience.

Masters will open many doors for lucrative job opportunities such as:

Staff Development specialist

Adjunct Clinical Instructor/Professor

Research Nurse

Consultant

Healthcare administrative positions - Directors, Managers

Midwives

rumwynnieRN

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

Masters will open many doors for lucrative job opportunities such as:

Staff Development specialist

Adjunct Clinical Instructor/Professor

Research Nurse

Consultant

Healthcare administrative positions - Directors, Managers

Midwives

When you say consultant, you mean the legal nurse consultant, right?

I guess I wouldn't mind too much being an adjunct clinical instructor, but then again, I'd be waking up at the butt crack of dawn again, and I hated doing that, unless there was a group that wanted to do nights.

Whispera, MSN, RN

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

Consultant can be more than legal nurse consultant. I'm the psychiatric consultant at a clinic...

JBudd, MSN

Specializes in Trauma, Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

I looked at the classes for each track in the masters, and considered which ones sounded the most interesting. Many of the basic required courses are the same for all of them. I decided on the education track because I also like to teach. I have stayed at the bedside (well, cart side in the ER, lol), and also do adjunct for the local CC. Quite a few of my coworkers have or are close to masters in different areas.

There are many areas for nursing education than just schools; in house education, staff development, etc.

rumwynnieRN

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

Can you explain how that works? If a pt exhibits signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder or has a history of schizophrenia, do they ask you to come and see the pt before the doctor? I didn't know that required a master's.

rumwynnieRN

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

I looked at the classes for each track in the masters, and considered which ones sounded the most interesting. Many of the basic required courses are the same for all of them. I decided on the education track because I also like to teach. I have stayed at the bedside (well, cart side in the ER, lol), and also do adjunct for the local CC. Quite a few of my coworkers have or are close to masters in different areas.

There are many areas for nursing education than just schools; in house education, staff development, etc.

Do you also do staff development with your master's? I know my position could very well change in 5 years, but staying bedside (and preferably at night) is my current goal. As you can tell by my original post, I'm completely ignorant of what can be done with an MSN outside of anesthesia, midwives, administration, NPs and PhDs.

rumwynnieRN

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

I think school's fa fools ;)! [video=youtube;vz-6-MfpsJo]

BAHAHAHAHA.

chiandre

Specializes in EDUCATION;HOMECARE;MATERNAL-CHILD; PSYCH. Has 25 years experience.

Do you also do staff development with your master's? I know my position could very well change in 5 years, but staying bedside (and preferably at night) is my current goal. As you can tell by my original post, I'm completely ignorant of what can be done with an MSN outside of anesthesia, midwives, administration, NPs and PhDs.

Yes, you need Masters for Staff Development. For consultant, I hire myself out to hospitals and schools to do projects such as Pain Management, Baby-Friendly Initiatives, Home Care intake, Securing clinical sites, etc. You definitely need your Masters to these roles.

rumwynnieRN

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

Yes, you need Masters for Staff Development. For consultant, I hire myself out to hospitals and schools to do projects such as Pain Management, Baby-Friendly Initiatives, Home Care intake, Securing clinical sites, etc. You definitely need your Masters to these roles.

For some of these roles, does it matter what I get my master's in? I guess it would depend on facility to facility.

RN., MSN, RN

Specializes in Perianesthesia. Has 30 years experience.

I would like to suggest obtaining a Master of Science Degree as a Clinical Nurse Leader.

I have, personally, loved this program. The specific program that I am in provides for a curriculum which can easily articulate into an NP/CNS/DNP program because it separates each of the 3 P’s (Advanced Physical Assessment, Advanced Pathophysiology, and Advance Pharmacology) as required in APRN programs.

But don’t take my word on the viability of an MSN/CNL; please read for yourself.

Lateral integration of care : facilitate, coordinate, and oversee thecare provided by the health care team.

Interdisciplinary care planning: communicate and collaborate withother members of the health care team.

Physician liaison: collaborate with physicians regarding the patient’splan of care by taking an active role in patient rounds.

Resource person: educate staff through mentoring, coaching andclinical conferences.

System analyst: manage and coordinate care at the multidisciplinarylevel.

Evidence-based practice (EBP): raise questions to challengeexisting practices in an effort to promote EBP.

(http://content2.learntoday.info/shu/NU_611/media/Week_05/the%20CNL%20a%20catalyst%20for%20improving%20quality%20and%20safety.pdf)

The CNL role is not restricted to the hospital setting. It is expected that the CNL will function across all settings in which healthcare is delivered, not just in the acute care setting. CNLs can function in community health centers, mental health treatment facilities, long-term care facilities, and other settings in which lateral integration will improve patient outcomes. (Opportunities for improving patient care through lateral integration: the clinical nurse leader. )

AACN about the CNL role: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/cnl/CNLFactSheet.pdf

weblink to CNL programs; American Association of Colleges of Nursing | CNL Programs

One more thing! http://www.cnlassociation.org

Edited by RN.
added link to Clinical Nurse Leader Association

rumwynnieRN

Specializes in Urology, ENT.

I would like to suggest obtaining a Master of Science Degree as a Clinical Nurse Leader.

I have, personally, loved this program. The specific program that I am in provides for a curriculum which can easily articulate into an NP/CNS/DNP program because it separates each of the 3 P’s (Advanced Physical Assessment, Advanced Pathophysiology, and Advance Pharmacology) as required in APRN programs.

But don’t take my word on the viability of an MSN/CNL; please read for yourself.

Lateral integration of care : facilitate, coordinate, and oversee thecare provided by the health care team.

Interdisciplinary care planning: communicate and collaborate withother members of the health care team.

Physician liaison: collaborate with physicians regarding the patient’splan of care by taking an active role in patient rounds.

Resource person: educate staff through mentoring, coaching andclinical conferences.

System analyst: manage and coordinate care at the multidisciplinarylevel.

Evidence-based practice (EBP): raise questions to challengeexisting practices in an effort to promote EBP.

(http://content2.learntoday.info/shu/NU_611/media/Week_05/the%20CNL%20a%20catalyst%20for%20improving%20quality%20and%20safety.pdf)

The CNL role is not restricted to the hospital setting. It is expected that the CNL will function across all settings in which healthcare is delivered, not just in the acute care setting. CNLs can function in community health centers, mental health treatment facilities, long-term care facilities, and other settings in which lateral integration will improve patient outcomes. (Opportunities for improving patient care through lateral integration: the clinical nurse leader. )

AACN about the CNL role: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/cnl/CNLFactSheet.pdf

weblink to CNL programs; American Association of Colleges of Nursing | CNL Programs

One more thing! http://www.cnlassociation.org

They had the CNL at the university near my in-laws (which is where I live at the moment), but at the moment, they've stopped admissions.

I'm happy with the responses I've gotten! Thanks everyone:)

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

I have a MSN Education and work as a bedside nurse. I precept new employees, work with capstone students and work extensively with our shared governance structure. I also do research.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

I was also going to suggest a Clinical Nurse Leader program. I think there needs to be a little tweaking of the job expectations of the graduates of those programs ... but the education they receive seems a great foundation for a lot of possible jobs.

RN., MSN, RN

Specializes in Perianesthesia. Has 30 years experience.

I was also going to suggest a Clinical Nurse Leader program. I think there needs to be a little tweaking of the job expectations of the graduates of those programs ... but the education they receive seems a great foundation for a lot of possible jobs.

There seems to be a vast difference of opinion as to how the role should be implemented in real practice.

I apologize for hijacking this thread with my CNL question; however, I am very curious to hear your suggestions for tweaking the job expectations of the graduates of the CNL programs.