Jump to content

I thought it would be easier to get a job.

Posted

Hi everyone,

Well with the supposed nursing shortage, I really thought it would be easier to find a job. I live in a large city, and could reasonably drive to 6 hospitals. I am finding that online postings are confusing. You don't really know what unit/type of job you are applying to. I have put in several applications, but haven't heard anything yet. Now, I will admit that I am trying to avoid med/surg at all costs, but none of the other options are working out. I'm just getting a little discouraged. I really need to get a job before too much longer. The money we saved for me to finish NS is running out!

Thanks,

suanna

Specializes in Post Anesthesia. Has 30 years experience.

"....I am trying to avoid med/surg at all costs"

I think I see your problem.

Many of us consider the nursing "shortage" to be a myth (there's plenty of discussion about that elsewhere on this site). It seems to be, at worst, a maldistribution of nurses -- there are areas of the US with significant shortages, but lots of areas are saturated and nurses (esp. new grads) can't find jobs. We're seeing more and more threads here lately about new grads in urban areas who can't find jobs; I think part of the problem is that hospitals are becoming more reluctant to hire new grads (also plenty of discussion elsewhere on the board about that).

Only you can decide what the best choice is for you, but it does seem obvious that, if you're not having any luck and you're running out of money, you may need to widen the range of what type of job you're willing to accept -- or consider relocating to an area where you can get the job you most want ...

Good luck with your search :) --

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

Many of us consider the nursing "shortage" to be a myth (there's plenty of discussion about that elsewhere on this site). It seems to be, at worst, a maldistribution of nurses -- there are areas of the US with significant shortages, but lots of areas are saturated and nurses (esp. new grads) can't find jobs. We're seeing more and more threads here lately about new grads in urban areas who can't find jobs; I think part of the problem is that hospitals are becoming more reluctant to hire new grads (also plenty of discussion elsewhere on the board about that).

Only you can decide what the best choice is for you, but it does seem obvious that, if you're not having any luck and you're running out of money, you may need to widen the range of what type of job you're willing to accept -- or consider relocating to an area where you can get the job you most want ...

Good luck with your search :) --

Well said.:yeah:

NFB2008

Specializes in NICU.

I thought it would be much easier too. I have not yet found a job, and I don't really like Med-Surg either. Good luck! I hope everything works out--I understand the stress and anxiety you are feeling.

Nurse McDreamy

Specializes in Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.

I would suggest emailing/ calling the recruiters and let them know that you are really interested in the job and would like to come in for an interview.

I had turned in all my apps and didnt hear from any hospitals until I started calling around and making myself known. Maybe that will help for you too.

Also remember, just because you start in a certain area doesnt mean you always have to stay there....you can always transfer within the hospital :D

Hope that helps!

Dolce, RN

Specializes in Day Surgery, Agency, Cath Lab, LTC/Psych.

I am a nurse who had a really hard time getting job as a new grad. My area was saturated with new grads and the hospitals were very limited in who they hired. I did not want to do med/surg. So, I moved away--gaining experience in other specialties. Now as an agency nurse I find myself being frequently staffed on med/surg units. Much to my surprise I find that I love med/surg.

I just wanted to pass that information along because there is often a lot of disdain for med/surg nursing among new grads. It is true that some really do hate it, but I think you shouldn't avoid something "at all costs" unless you've tried it out for yourself. If med/surg is the only position available in your area and you are not wanting to move I would give it a shot. I find med/surg to be exciting, varied, challenging, and rewarding. I think every shift I learn something new. Every nurse that I have known with med/surg experience doesn't regret for a minute the knowledge they gained.

MistiroseRN

Specializes in RN in LTC.

I am a nurse who had a really hard time getting job as a new grad. My area was saturated with new grads and the hospitals were very limited in who they hired. I did not want to do med/surg. So, I moved away--gaining experience in other specialties. Now as an agency nurse I find myself being frequently staffed on med/surg units. Much to my surprise I find that I love med/surg.

I just wanted to pass that information along because there is often a lot of disdain for med/surg nursing among new grads. It is true that some really do hate it, but I think you shouldn't avoid something "at all costs" unless you've tried it out for yourself. If med/surg is the only position available in your area and you are not wanting to move I would give it a shot. I find med/surg to be exciting, varied, challenging, and rewarding. I think every shift I learn something new. Every nurse that I have known with med/surg experience doesn't regret for a minute the knowledge they gained.

I am in the minority at my school because I want to do med/surg. I am in total agreemant that there is alot of knowledge to be gained by working med/surg and often wonder why my fellow students would choose not to start there? I understand it is not an easy job but I don't think any nursing job is easy. I feel med/surg gives a good foundation to go on to specialties. That's just my oppinion.

NFB2008

Specializes in NICU.

Don't give up yet. I just got a call today with a job offer in the NICU! Just keep applying and interviewing in places that interest you.

Thanks everyone for your feedback and experiences. I may have to take a med/surg position if nothing else works out.

It's not that I hated med/surg. I did learn a lot about a variety of disease processes. It just scares me hearing horror stories of having 8,9,10 patients, plus in my observation med/surg nurses seemed to have a lower morale and be more back-stabbing.

If I have to start out there, I will make the best of it and take away a lot of knowledge and good work habits. It's just that I had a "plan/vision" of how my career would go, and med/surg was not part of the equation. :uhoh3:

Thanks again.

WDWpixieRN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg <1; Epic Certified <1.

If I have to start out there, I will make the best of it and take away a lot of knowledge and good work habits. It's just that I had a "plan/vision" of how my career would go, and med/surg was not part of the equation.

Tango, I understand where you are coming from. In this area, there are a number of "specialty-type" positions available, but there are also a huge amount of graduates.

Unlike the poster above, I did not get the NICU job I was hoping for. It took me a few days to talk myself in to convincing myself that med/surg would be a good alternative. That was truly my only real goal through nursing school other than the ER. After doing an internship and working as a tech in an ER, I realized that I could rule that out so only applied for NICU positions.

I don't love the idea of now doing med/surg, but understand that in the long run with a year or so of that under my belt, I will be a much more attractive job candidate and will have a good foundation to go forward with my nursing career. I truly don't believe the time will be wasted and do believe that sometimes there's a hand in the direction our lives take that sometimes leads us to places we need to be over the places we want to be.

Dolce, RN

Specializes in Day Surgery, Agency, Cath Lab, LTC/Psych.

Thanks everyone for your feedback and experiences. I may have to take a med/surg position if nothing else works out.

It's not that I hated med/surg. I did learn a lot about a variety of disease processes. It just scares me hearing horror stories of having 8,9,10 patients, plus in my observation med/surg nurses seemed to have a lower morale and be more back-stabbing.

If I have to start out there, I will make the best of it and take away a lot of knowledge and good work habits. It's just that I had a "plan/vision" of how my career would go, and med/surg was not part of the equation. :uhoh3:

Thanks again.

These are definitely issues you would want to bring up in an interview. Some hospitals have unions that specify how many patients nurses will take. (One of the hospitals I staff for does not allow a greater than 6:1 staffing ratio. It is in their union contract). Unit culture is something that you can bring up in your interview but don't expect perfect honesty. You can ask how long some of the nurses have been on the unit--that will give you a clue to how much those nurses like their job.

As a side note...if the area you are living in is not a nursing shortage location I would treat every job offer with a certain amount of suspicion. Because I live in the Northwest I received many calls, even as a new grad, for specialty positions in Seattle. At the time I graduated Seattle was a huge nursing shortage area. I got a job offer over the phone before I had even formally interviewed for a specialty unit. This gave me a big clue that they were desperate for a warm body. When I turned down the offer they were rude about it. Another clue.

Please be careful about what you are looking for. Specialty units can be hotbeds of backstabbing just like any other unit.

Best of luck in your Job Search!

NFB2008

Specializes in NICU.

I was going to look into a med-surg "residency" that a local hospital just started if I hadn't gotten another job. I think part of the reason I don't like med-surg is for the same reasons you listed. I do, however, think you would get good experience in that area, and if you wanted to transfer after a year or two, it would be much easier to get a position in an area you're more interested in. Good luck in whatever area you work!

I truly don't believe the time will be wasted and do believe that sometimes there's a hand in the direction our lives take that sometimes leads us to places we need to be over the places we want to be.

WDWpixie,

Thank you so much for your words of encouragement. Your words gave me goosebumps. I need to learn to let go sometimes and let things work out the way they were meant to be.

Thanks again. :yeah:

WDWpixieRN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg <1; Epic Certified <1.

Thank you so much for your words of encouragement. Your words gave me goosebumps. I need to learn to let go sometimes and let things work out the way they were meant to be.

Definately easier said than internalized sometimes, lol....now that I know I have to go in the med/surg direction myself, I am so torn between 3 or 4 hospitals in this area -- big teaching hospital; or a smaller hospital where I have been doing clinicals and an internship and seen more backbiting than I care to deal with but have been encouraged by some of the best folks there to apply?; the hospital with a sign-on bonus that is anywhere from 2 - 5 times that of other local hospitals (and why is that?); or another smaller hospital very close to home where 2 very good friends from NS will be working (on another floor); etc., etc.....

I'm waiting for that great hand of fate to point me in the right direction myself, lol....but I know in the end it will work out for the best...

Best wishes!! :heartbeat

NewRN2008, ASN, RN

Specializes in Ortho; Gyn; Urology; HBOT; Emergent. Has 8 years experience.

This whole thing of ppl saying there is a nursing shortage- i dont get it, cuz i know that i can work anywhere, anytime, any shift, which some reasonable demands from my end.

if you need to start on a med/surg- you may need to, but that is at least a foot in the door. but if you really are so opposed to doing it- keep trying. keep in mind you may need to up and reloacate- things could be worse right?

gl!!

-H-

Joe NightingMale, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med surg, cardiac, case management. Has 4 years experience.

We're seeing more and more threads here lately about new grads in urban areas who can't find jobs;

I'm not sure I'd consider that to be a reliable source of info...it may be that these threads represent the exception rather than the rule.

In addition there is a phenomena I've observed where you ask 3 nurses a question and you get 4 opinions. ;)

What I've heard is that there is a nursing glut centered around Boston, with vacancy rates of only about 3%. To a lesser extent this holds true for the rest of the northeast. However, as you move to the west and south there is a shortage and vacancy rates are 10% or more.

Have you inquired about job fairs for new grads? Most hospitals who are receptive to graduate nurses seem to do all their hiring at once, at least for the specialty areas. Ours were back in February and the only people who got med-surg jobs were the ones who specifically wanted those spots. I would also make sure you're following up your online applications with a call to HR or even the nursing manager if you can obtain their contact info. Sometimes it's easy to get "lost" in the computer system and personal contact shows extra effort and interest.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.