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I quit

Updated | Posted

Specializes in Cardiac & Vascular. Has 3 years experience.

Hey all,

I've been an RN for 18 months and I will be resigning from my floor in two weeks. I realize this isn't a wise idea. I'm just so burnt out and I know that's not the place for me. I have an offer for a nursing home, but I feel I may get overwhelmed by the number of pts. I'm really not sure what kind of nurse I want to be. I've considered the ICU. How did you guys find your niche? I love taking care of the pts but hate the unnecessary drama. Drowning in work constantly with no real help. We've been short a good bit and when this happens some of us have to take an extra pt. Our ratios are 4-6 pts. It's mostly 6 now without considering the acuity of the pts.

Also, I think nights are making me feel drained all the time. But I don't necessarily want to have a 9-5, no weekends or holidays. I don't like having to take call 1-2 times per month. I also don't like the scheduling at my job now. Ex. one work week. M, T, F, Sa, Sun. It feels like by the time I recover it's time to go back to work. Part of me feels like I need a 2-3 week break and the other part is worried I won't find a position I like. I'm just so confused.

If you want to work in the ICU then I highly recommend you do not resign your position.

ADN_Is_Complete, ADN

Specializes in Cardiac & Vascular. Has 3 years experience.

@ Wuzzie. Too late I turned in my resignation 2 weeks ago.

Well, that's unfortunate. You need a job and it looks like your only option is the ECF which will definitely hamper your ability to get in the ICU. Can you rescind it and start looking for something else?

ADN_Is_Complete, ADN

Specializes in Cardiac & Vascular. Has 3 years experience.

I could try. I don't know how well that would go over with my director.

JadedCPN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 15 years experience.

Just now, ADN_Is_Complete said:

I could try. I don't know how well that would go over with my director.

I would definitely try if I were you. Your director couldn't fire you since you already resigned, so you've essentially got nothing to lose.

5 minutes ago, ADN_Is_Complete said:

I could try. I don't know how well that would go over with my director.

You could tell her you made a rash decision based on moral distress but now that you've had a chance to think you realize it was not the direction you wanted to take. This will give you time to really look for something that fits better.

ADN_Is_Complete, ADN

Specializes in Cardiac & Vascular. Has 3 years experience.

4 minutes ago, JadedCPN said:

I would definitely try if I were you. Your director couldn't fire you since you already resigned, so you've essentially got nothing to lose.

I'll try. She didn't seem to care at all that I was resigning so I doubt she'll rescind it.

Well, this is a pickle. You might try HR as well.

kp2016

Has 20 years experience.

It sounds like your unit is short staffed. Maybe ask your manager if she would put you on the casual roster? It will give you some income and breathing space while you decide your next move.

ADN_Is_Complete, ADN

Specializes in Cardiac & Vascular. Has 3 years experience.

19 minutes ago, Wuzzie said:

Well, this is a pickle. You might try HR as well.

I know. I've managed to dig a hole I can't get out of. I spoke with HR today. She sent my resume out. I interviewed for a float position earlier but I don't think that went well. She wanted exact reasons why I wanted to be off that floor. I just told her I wanted a change. I don't think that was a good enough response. Oh well. And I'll see if my director will rescind or keep me prn.

Smsanch2

Specializes in PCU. Has 8 years experience.

I hope you find a position you’ll like and will stay In for a while. Sounds like schedule is important to you. I’ve worked several float pool gigs because of how flexible the scheduling is. I *highly* recommend it. There are pros and cons to it obviously, but for me personally the pros outweigh cons. Love that I don’t have to deal with any type of unit bull—— and drama.

K+MgSO4, BSN

Specializes in Surgical, quality,management. Has 12 years experience.

Not to get on my soap box....but this is why proper annual leave allowance and enough fat in staff numbers to be able to approve time off is essential. Also it fascinates me that in the US you get such scant leave. I get 6 weeks paid a year.

**steps off soapbox **

Would it be helpful to take a few weeks off, go on casual roster and apply for a new position at a shift less per pay period?

Rosalie Blythe, BSN, RN

Specializes in Endoscopy/Gastroenterology, General Surgery. Has 3 years experience.

You can try dental office and private clinic needs a RN with ACLS. It’s outpatient and not a lot of “drama” from colleague and family members.

On 3/13/2020 at 7:24 AM, K+MgSO4 said:

Not to get on my soap box....but this is why proper annual leave allowance and enough fat in staff numbers to be able to approve time off is essential. Also it fascinates me that in the US you get such scant leave. I get 6 weeks paid a year.

**steps off soapbox **

Would it be helpful to take a few weeks off, go on casual roster and apply for a new position at a shift less per pay period?

Where do you live & is it easy to become a nurse there from the USA? 😁

ADN_Is_Complete, ADN

Specializes in Cardiac & Vascular. Has 3 years experience.

2 hours ago, roseblythe1995 said:

You can try dental office and private clinic needs a RN with ACLS. It’s outpatient and not a lot of “drama” from colleague and family members.

I've tried Family Med and Urgent Care but I think the nurses with more experience get those positions.

2 hours ago, Mergirlc said:

Where do you live & is it easy to become a nurse there from the USA? 😁

South Carolina and I wouldn't say it's too bad.

ADN_Is_Complete, ADN

Specializes in Cardiac & Vascular. Has 3 years experience.

On 3/13/2020 at 7:24 AM, K+MgSO4 said:

Not to get on my soap box....but this is why proper annual leave allowance and enough fat in staff numbers to be able to approve time off is essential. Also it fascinates me that in the US you get such scant leave. I get 6 weeks paid a year.

**steps off soapbox **

Would it be helpful to take a few weeks off, go on casual roster and apply for a new position at a shift less per pay period?

That's what I was thinking. Maybe I should take 2-3 weeks off and get a position where I can make my own schedule or scheduling is more considerate.

CommunityRNBSN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community health. Has 3 years experience.

You can always try outpatient. I love it (although you say you've considered ICU, which is the opposite, so maybe that means you don't have any interest in outpatient).