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I need major assistance

Ob/Gyn   (1,883 Views 14 Comments)
by Kay1669 Kay1669 (New Member) New Member

413 Profile Views; 1 Post

I recently had my baby girl two months ago, and i was about to finish my studies in Medical Billing, but i was so inspired by three RN'S that assisted with my pregnancy, that now i realized this is it, this is what i want to do for the rest of my life i want to make soon to be mommys comfortable make their birthing day memorable, and assist them in the after birth process. after my birth i began hemorhaging and my nurse would change me and try to make me feel better, the point is i dont mind being the person to change another person bloody diapers " i know i sound sick" lol but im seroius.

ok ok now to the point i will begin community college on june 21st

and i know i have advisors at school but i want pointers from the real people the real deal the ones who have made it, what should i do? should i go ahead and get my AA and transfer to a four year, or should i get my AAS in Nursing get some work experience and then major in my specialty.

Im all for putting forth as many years into this as needed i just want to hear som opinions personal experiences and so forth.

please help me with my future goal.

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344 Posts; 4,259 Profile Views

Youo are the only one who can make the choice as to whether to go to a 4 year program or a 2 year. Do you think u want 2 become a midwife and deliver babies? If you have any inkling thaa u would want to do this, go for the 4 yr. You have to have a bsn to get into midwifery.

In nursing, you dont go to school to specialize..... only if you are getting your masters or doctorate do you "specialize." Once you are out of school, you go into whatever department you wan to.... labor and delivery, OR, med surg, the posibilities are endless.

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Trophywife81 specializes in Med-Surg, gynecology.

88 Posts; 3,198 Profile Views

If you want to primarily focus on bedside care, the ADN (associate degree in nursing) is all you need. There is essentially no difference in the pay for a bedside nurse with an ADN than for a nurse with a BSN. However, if you wish to eventually move into management, or if you desire to become an advanced practice nurse (midwife, nurse practitioner, etc.), go for the BSN.

If time and money are an issue, you can always get the ADN and then slowly earn credits for the BSN.

Hope this is helpful; good luck!

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Woodenpug is a BSN and specializes in MPCU.

733 Posts; 7,276 Profile Views

I went from CNA to LVN and then spent years in attempting to complete all the prereqs. Everyone says they do not change the prereqs, but they do. Each semester. I would have saved a lot of time and money had I chosen to do my prereqs at the same school as the BSN program.

L.V.N. to BSN was the best option for me. If you choose to go ADN to BSN you will have one extra semester to complete - 2 years ADN, 1 year BSN and 1 bridge semester. Some ADN schools do not require biochem as a prereq. Many ADN schools use a lottery system for admission, so even with the extra prereq you may end up finishing faster if you enter a BSN program. If you can afford a private college, it is possible to complete the BSN program and all requirements in 4 years. State colleges would typically take 5 years. ADN including prereqs generally takes 3 years.

May I suggest that you work as a volunteer or CNA before you commit to a lot of education. The drop out rate after graduation is quite high, in part because people find out that they really do not like nursing only after graduation. (nursing school is nothing like the real world of nursing.)

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29 Posts; 1,106 Profile Views

I went to a 2 year program and there are no difference at the hospital I work at except like 60 extra cents an hour or so... and I have no desire to ever go into management... so it was the best option for me! Plus I graduated college when I was only 19 with my RN degree :)

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862 Posts; 7,619 Profile Views

If it were me I would get the ADN and get a nursing job. If you decide you want to move to management or get become a nurse practitioner or midwife it seems that most porgrams have the ADN-MSN bridge these days. That way you can get a feel for the job, be sure it's what you want to do, and save time and money. I do not have a degree in nursing at all but a certificate and a license and I had no trouble finding a job.

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classicdame is a MSN, EdD and specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

2 Articles; 7,255 Posts; 26,200 Profile Views

I assume AS is associates degree in science, but what is AAS?

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dria has 10 years experience and specializes in home health, peds, case management.

246 Posts; 5,427 Profile Views

associate's in applied science

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21 Posts; 826 Profile Views

Yeehaw! Congrats on the little one! your brave to be looking inot nursing school with a kid I give ya credit! Anyway I am in an associates program and in clinicals I have noticed that the majority do just fine with just a ADN plus you can always get some experience and then decide if ya want to go back for BSN or even higher!

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Medic/Nurse is a BSN, RN and specializes in Flight, ER, Transport, ICU/Critical Care.

880 Posts; 14,899 Profile Views

There is a nursing SHORTAGE.

I always tell folks to use this to your ADVANTAGE.

There are very few times in your like that ADVANTAGE is yours for the taking.

Take it....NOW.

Get the Associates. Pass the NCLEX. Get into clinical practice. Make Money. LET YOUR EMPLOYER foot the bill for continued study. Most offer tuition assistance that is NOT linked to contracts, service commitments and such.

You are young at 21.

The sky is the limit.

Education is great and I will always be a lifelong student.

However, experience will give you all the answers that education can not.

Good Luck!

You can do it!

;)

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112 Posts; 1,884 Profile Views

Don't overwhelm yourself with plans. Take one thing at a time and when you earn your ADN, you decide what will be your next steps. There is nothing wrong with being excited, but you are going to need more than that when you experience years of hard work in nursing school in order to make it through the graduation.So be realistic by setting your mind to accomplish y0ur manageable goals then move on to your longer term goals. Along the way, you will discovery the best career path for you based on what you make it out of your experience ---that is why you are the only person who can definitely find the answer to your question.

wishing you the best on your tough journey!

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Anjann is a RN and specializes in M/S/Ortho/Bari/ED.

135 Posts; 3,355 Profile Views

I'm an FAU alumni and If I remember correctly, PBCC, Broward, FAU, FIU, Miami-Dade, and Barry (maybe Lynn University as well) all have good nursing programs. You have alot of options. And FAU has that onsite day care center now.

I agree with Swatch007. Start off small with bite size pieces and go from there. The pre-reqs can be challenging, but are not impossible if you really want the prize at the end.

IF you live in Boca, and can manage it, I'd start off with a counselor at PBCC who can get you into some reasonably priced summer courses, alot of pre-req's are even available online now. You have to be in it for the long haul and be determined to let nothing get in your way. It is quite a struggle for some of us, but we knew what we wanted and we were willing to do whatever it took and more importantly to get back up no matter how many times I got knocked down. It's not all rough times, though. By the time you work your way up to clinicals, you finally get to put into practice that desire to truly comfort people, and that makes all of your struggles seem worth it. I also think that is the mark of a natural nurse. you will spend your whole career honing your craft, but TLC is not something that can be taught at any clinical! GO for your dream! We'll (someone!) will always be here for help and support! It takes courage to chase a dream, and that is half the battle! :monkeydance:

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