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I need help making this decision and its urgent!

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harmonylove28 has 10 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Registered Nurse.

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On 3/14/2019 at 3:54 AM, jfratian said:

I think it's a massive a stretch to say you make as much as a CRNA.  I live in California and make about $100,000 as a mid-grade O-3 nurse, which includes a sizable housing allowance.  If you incorporate the fact that my food and housing allowance is tax free (I pay a 17% effective federal tax rate and no state taxes); my effective income is about $110,000.  If you are eligible for a retention bonus (many people aren't depending on their years of service, AFIT applications, etc), you might bump that to $145,000.  Civilian CRNAs here make an average of $200,000.  You're not making more than that even as an O-6 with 30 years in service.

Plus, I would say the average CRNA isn't working as many hours as I am (48 hours per week when stateside, 72 hours per week when deployed).

Jfrantian,

I was taking a salary of $150,000 at ~30% tax bracket. 150,000 * 30% = 45,000 in federal taxes, not including state tax.

$105,000 not including state taxes, health, dental or liability insurance.

$105,000/12 = $8,750/month, again without the above deductions, nor with any perks with military service.

My current take home as a SRNA is $8100/month. Military is great for the experience, the benefits, retirement, deploying, and taking care of America's 1%.

Cheers

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jfratian has 7 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a ICU Nurse, U.S. Air Force.

10 Likes; 11,387 Visitors; 1,280 Posts

1 hour ago, PEK93RT said:

Jfrantian,

I was taking a salary of $150,000 at ~30% tax bracket. 150,000 * 30% = 45,000 in federal taxes, not including state tax.

$105,000 not including state taxes, health, dental or liability insurance.

$105,000/12 = $8,750/month, again without the above deductions, nor with any perks with military service.

My current take home as a SRNA is $8100/month. Military is great for the experience, the benefits, retirement, deploying, and taking care of America's 1%.

Cheers

First, your wage of $150K is below the national average for CNRAs which is $160K per Becker's.  The highest states (Montana and Wyoming) pay an average of $240K; neither have very high cost of living or tax burdens.  

Second, you're not working deployment hours as a civilian CRNA ever, which is typically six 12-hour shifts per week for 6 months;  this can occur every 18-24 months (depending on the base).  A CRNA in Montana working deployment hours (@ $117.09/hr ... their average) would make $219,192.48 in 6 months... on track for $438,384.96 per year.  Your military pension will be worth about $2-4 million (assuming 20-30 years of service as an officer and a life expectancy of 78); pretty sure you could make that up pretty quick if you really wanted.

Nor are you moving every 2-4 years or coming into work on your off days for recalls, drug tests, PT tests or additional duties.  You seem to be making an argument that someone choose the military as a CRNA over civilian as a CRNA from a financial perspective.  That doesn't make sense, because there are other financially more advantageous options.  You would literally get almost all those benefits, a better quality of life, take care of the same patients, and make more money as a CRNA working for the VA or the US Public Health Service.

Having said that, there are many excellent reasons to be in the military.  I've been in for going on 6 years now.  Money really isn't it.  

Edited by jfratian

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