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I was accepted for my Masters... but now what do I do

NP Students   (650 Views | 5 Replies)

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I recently was accepted into a highly prestigious, FREE, FNP program that is offered through my company. I was super excited about this opportunity, but have been second guessing EVERYTHING. I am extremely overwhelmed with making the decision to do it, when prior to my acceptance I was 100% in. I recently spoke to a few people in the program- all who say the program is nearly impossible and that it is free for a reason , Bc you pay in other ways. 
 

am I stupid for declining such an amazing offer? It’s a 3 year, in class (traditional) learning style. However, I would have to transfer to a part time position to be able to balance work and school. I’d also have to agree to work wherever they place me post-graduation for 2 year agreement. Which is a pro and a con. I feel like it’s not very flexible and might be too demanding. If I don’t maintain a B average, I have to continue paying for the program without receiving a degree. It seems like a lot of pressure and a lot to risk. 
 

 secondly, there are many other programs where I could apply for FNP that aren’t as great as this current program, but they are more flexible and would allow me to live a little. I’m so torn. 

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yournurse has 2 years experience.

138 Posts; 3,006 Profile Views

JUST Do it. Healthcare is going towards advanced degrees. We have a shortage. If I were in your situation, I wouldn’t ask questions. I would do it, do the 2 yr contract wherever they place you. Suck it up for 2 yrs. 

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FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

8 Followers; 2 Articles; 1,069 Posts; 10,251 Profile Views

If  you are offered the chance for a free FNP at a good school, then buckle down and do it.  Of course they are going to ask something in return!  Having to work for them for 2 years is hardly unreasonable.  Given how many new grad NPs seem to have trouble getting a job, you should be grateful to have a guaranteed job.

An MSN or DNP is a graduate level degree and it SHOULD  be hard!!!  Put on your big girl or boy pants and do the work.  Being a provider is a big responsibility, and good for the school for making it hard.

In ANY field, getting less than a B in grad school is tantamount to failing.  Someone who can't maintain a B average in NP school doesn't deserve to be an NP.

There are so many people who would jump at the chance you've been given.  If you aren't willing to put in the work, then please do not become an NP, ever.

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LadyT618 has 15 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Home Health, Primary Care.

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On 2/4/2020 at 3:50 AM, Klyver said:

I recently spoke to a few people in the program- all who say the program is nearly impossible and that it is free for a reason , Bc you pay in other ways. 
 

If I don’t maintain a B average, I have to continue paying for the program without receiving a degree. It seems like a lot of pressure and a lot to risk. 
 

I'm curious as to the reasons those people say it is "impossible." Are these people just lazy and are slackers and don't want to put in the hard work??

And like @FullGlass said, these programs are supposed to be difficult and B minimum is standard. Being a provider is a huge responsibility, one that should NOT be taken lightly.

People would kill for the opportunity to go to NP school free of charge. And if 2 years at a guaranteed position is your payback for receiving such a gift, suck it up, like @yournurse said.

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31 Posts; 794 Profile Views

This is YOUR life.  5 years is a long time to "suck it up".  If you really want the degree, then of course it will be worth hard work and sacrifice, and then the work experience you will gain will be worthwhile, even if not perfect.  As others have said, NP programs are difficult because students need to be WELL prepared to be NP's - it is a lot of information and a lot of responsibility.

No one can make this decision for you.  You need to think about your own life, your family and other responsibilities.  You are not crazy to be thinking carefully about this.  This is a big decision and will impact you for a long, long time! But, it is not the only option - there are always opportunities, and letting one go, does not mean you will not have another.  Trust your instincts and you will make a decision that you will be happy with!

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13 Followers; 4,056 Posts; 31,495 Profile Views

On 2/4/2020 at 4:50 AM, Klyver said:

I recently spoke to a few people in the program- all who say the program is nearly impossible

Agree this is potentially somewhat dependent upon the situations and the abilities of the people who are saying it.

 

On 2/4/2020 at 4:50 AM, Klyver said:

I’d also have to agree to work wherever they place me post-graduation for 2 year agreement.

Personal preference. Nope for me; not unless the contract included a lot more detail about what I can expect from the educational process and especially from said post-graduation placement. There are no protections here, just like there are no protections for the new-grad RNs who sign longer-term contracts in return for a "residency" which could consist of just about anything. Assuming that provisions which would afford me any sort of protection whatsoever are not going to be forthcoming, I would rather pay and keep whatever small amount of freedom doing so affords me.

 

On 2/4/2020 at 4:50 AM, Klyver said:

If I don’t maintain a B average, I have to continue paying for the program without receiving a degree.

 

What does this even mean? That you will pay for the credits earned/attempted up to that point, or that you will be on the hook for whatever monetary value they place on the entire program?

The problem isn't that it is "unfair" that you would have to pay if you fail; that's sort of reasonable to the extent that it prevents uncommitted people from taking up space in a program and then not applying themselves in a significant effort to become a safe provider.

But the big general problem with this kind of arrangement is that the school gets the money either way, the company's risk is significantly reduced without providing you any protections, and as for you, well, you either like (agree to) **everything** that happens from now til the end of your 2-year contract, or you pay; no other option--regardless of how they choose to consider their obligations satisfied.

Is it an opportunity? Of course. Lots of things are potential opportunities. The question is whether or not the opportunity is worth the various risks. And we are each going to make our own decisions about that.

Edited by JKL33

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