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How to prepare for NP school??

Posted

Sent off my application....I am going to make a big assumption and assume I get accepted for this fall....

I would like to use this "down time" to save money and prepare..What advice does anyone have about what to review? If you could have "pre-read" any book or studied any area what would it have been?

Thanks

MillieT

Specializes in Oncology. Has 11 years experience.

Sent off my application....I am going to make a big assumption and assume I get accepted for this fall....

I would like to use this "down time" to save money and prepare..What advice does anyone have about what to review? If you could have "pre-read" any book or studied any area what would it have been?

Thanks

Pathophysiology was my most difficult class so far, brushing up on that might be helpful. RN experience is invaluable.

I would save money for Margaret Fitzgerald audio cd's and DVDs. I have hers for pharm and will hopefully be able to get the assessment set also. They are quite expensive though.

Good luck,

Millie

MERCEDES674, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU-Step Down, Cardiac/CHF, Telemetry, L&D. Has 6 years experience.

I would certainly go over patho and A&P. You don't get any A&P so if you have been out for a while then I would definitely review those areas.

assuming i get in also....im doing the same thing....using this a my down time before diving into a 5 year school commitment. as much as i dont want to review during my downtime, maybe its a good idea. thanks for the suggestions!

JeanettePNP, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy. Has 8 years experience.

I had to take an advanced phys class for my master's but I didn't find that it covered that much more than undergrad.

The thing I would concentrate on if you're pre-reading is pharm. My undergrad program was notoriously weak in pharm so this is where I had to do the most catch-up work. Really get to know your drug classes, mech of action, key side effects and WHY they are getting those side effects. One thing that was emphasized a lot in the graduate level pharm class was drug interactions, which we didnt pay that much attention to in undergrad but become very important to understand if you're the provider. But don't worry about that before class starts -- I would spend the time just making sure you know the basics very well and you can put all your energy into learning the more advanced stuff.

RNTwin

Specializes in Critical Care Nursing AKA ICU.

learn to right lots of APA PAPERS!!! really if your doing ACNP get the Barkley book and memorize it.

More than anything else, understand what a differential diagnosis is. This was something that tripped up many of my colleagues, regardless of years of RN experience. This is a new skill set for RNs. Pathology, physical diagnosis, pharmacology...these are not conceptually different (just different in terms of breadth and depth at our new level). Learning to make a differential, then narrow it down based on history, signs and symptoms, labs, is a new thing. Having it clear at a conceptual level will serve you well in NP school.

Sent off my application....I am going to make a big assumption and assume I get accepted for this fall....

I would like to use this "down time" to save money and prepare..What advice does anyone have about what to review? If you could have "pre-read" any book or studied any area what would it have been?

Thanks

I agree with millie T the fitzgerald audio cd's were well worth it.

http://www.sell.com/28LG2N

Annaiya, NP

Specializes in PICU. Has 5 years experience.

IMO, go on a vacation, get that closet reorganized that you've wanted to do, but don't seem to get around to, etc. Once school starts, you will likely be unable to do anything else except the basic necessities, so get everything "extra" done while you still have time. Especially if you will have to continue to work full-time during the program. I'm lucky if I have time to grocery shop twice a month. I have such a long list of things I want to do after I graduate:)

Exercise at least 5 days a week, 30 min per day. Eat healthy. Get rest. Find out what books you will be using ahead of time and get the older version under the latest at Ebay or Amazon, most of the time, the older texts would work. Get a smartphone. Get a good reliable computer and plenty of flashdrives to save articles, schoolwork, etc. Write your schedule down on a calendar as soon as you get the syllabus. Attend professional organization meetings in your area (good way to network). Set up your study area. Stock pile on pens and highlighters. Before school starts, spend lots of time with your family.

Edited by iMACRN2FNP
correction

Your advice here is pretty wonderful. I'm going to do all that. Thank you!

Awesome responses I am definitely going to do all that you all suggested....I have four months to prepare