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How long does the whole entire " becoming a registered nurse" process take?

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I really would like to know how long the whole entire " becoming a registered nurse" takes? This is including lvn programs and NCLEXPN. I am considering this as a career and im trying to get all my facts straight. Your help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

NurseCard, ADN

Specializes in Med/Surge, Psych, LTC, Home Health. Has 13 years experience.

Well... You have to decide where you would like to go to school,

file your application, wait to be accepted. Also you have to

secure financial aid, or finances, to go to school.

Once you are accepted to school, you generally spend at least

a year just taking general education courses, then you may

start your nursing curriculum.

If you want to go for just the LVN/LPN, you are looking at

about two years of classes, then you have to take the NCLEX.

If you want to get your ADN to become an RN, probably about

3 years.

For a Bachelors of Science in nursing, about four.

Edited by NurseCard
paragraph

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

"Registered Nurses" do not include LVNs/LPNs ....we are all nurses, but RNs are "registered nurses" and LVNs are "Licensed vocational/practical nurses".

What's your starting point? Graduation from high school?

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 14 years experience.

I really would like to know how long the whole entire " becoming a registered nurse" takes? This is including lvn programs and NCLEXPN. I am considering this as a career and im trying to get all my facts straight. Your help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
You do realize that an individual can become a registered nurse without ever becoming an LVN, correct?

While I first worked as an LVN, the added step of becoming an LVN is not necessary before becoming an RN. Many of us became LVNs first because it was a more expedient path into the nursing profession, especially for nontraditional students.

verene, MSN

Specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

The answer is: it varies.

Where are you coming from: High school, some college, prior degree? Do you have any course work you are bringing forward with you (e.g. you took calculus in high school and can test out of math in college)? Or are you starting from the very beginning?

It will also depend on where you plan on going to school. Different nursing programs have slightly different pre-req courses they require . Sometimes these pre-req courses have pre-reqs depending on the school you may be allowed to challenge out of the intro sequence of courses or you may have to take those classes.

If looking at an LVN certification. The course work for the LVN program is typically 4 quarters after completing pre-reqs which may take up to a year.

LVN as an associates degree is 2-3 years total time.

ASN degree for a registered nurse is 3-4 years depending on pre-req time.

A BSN degree for registered nurse can be done straight through in 4 years, but may take 5. If bridging from an ASN degree program it will take an additional 9-12 months of coursework (or 4-5 years total time.)

If you already have a prior BA/BS degree that includes pre-reqs you could finish out a BSN degree in 2 years of nursing coursework.

Again if you have a prior degree, there are acclerated programs for completing the BSN, which are 12-18months of nurse coursework following 1-2 years of pre-req courses.

Things to consider: what is your end goal? (job title or education level). What does it take to get there? What options are available to your for meeting the educational requirements? What are you willing to pay?

Nursing is wonderful in that there are many, many, different pathways to take to become a nurse which allows people of many backgrounds to join the nursing profession. However it can be difficult to find the "best" path for one's self to take because there are so many options.

Buyer beware, BSN

Specializes in GENERAL. Has 40 years experience.

'However it can be difficult to find the "best" path for one's self to take because there are so many options.'

And that's the bloody problem...in attempting to answer your question.

barcode120x, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

As some have said, it varies. Let's be realistic in this time in regards to an ADN program and community colleges. CC are currently impacted as people are going back to school. Not only that, nursing itself is and has been impacted. So you may not necessarily get your pre-requisite classes right away when you back to school. If the ADN program you are looking to get into just needs micro, physio, and anatomy, that should take 1 to 1.5 years (2-3 semesters on average). Then, you need to take your TEAs or Hesi test in order to actually apply for the program. THEN, you have to wait. After waiting, you get into the program and most ADN programs are 2 years long (4 semesters) assuming you don't have to retake courses. After graduating, you need to wait for BRN to issue your test date. Depending on how lucky you are, you can get your test date after a month of graduating, your may have to wait 3+ months like I did to get your test date. Tally up the times, you're looking at a minimum of 4 years before you get RN license. In this day and age, chances are it will be longer than that due to huge wait lists to get into ADN programs.

A quick example is me. It took me 1.5 years (3 semesters) to get my pre-req courses down and the Hesi test completed. I waited 2.5 years (5 semesters) before getting into the program. The ADN program was 2 years (4 semesters). I graduated end of December, but didn't get my ATT until first week of March. Took my test/passed April 1st. Time frame = 6.5 years

BSN programs at a university can be similar, but maybe quicker if you have top notch grades. BSN programs can take 2 years, but can be done as early as 1 year if you are in an accelerated program. But just like the ADN program, you still need to get your 3 (or more) pre-requisite classes done first, take your TEAs/Hesi test next, then apply. So honestly, the time frame of getting a BSN vs and ADN COULD be about the same time...at least 4 years. BSN programs are also not exempt from wait listing nursing students. Then after you graduate, you still have to wait for the BRN to issue your ATT.

IMO, these are realistic numbers now, but chances are the time it takes to get your RN is probably longer than what I've listed.